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When/How To Ask If You Will Be Kept On

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Hello,

I am currently working at a company on a 12 months contract, when I started they said there would be a possibility of being kept on at the end of my contract (whether that is a rolling contract or full time employee I am unsure). I have been here for almost 9 months now.

What is the best way to go about asking if I will have a job at the end of my contract? I was thinking of asking for a 9 month review and bringing it up then if they do not mention it.


Some key things that may alter the answer to the question:
-This company is very small (but somewhat stable)
-At the moment I am on a government scheme (essentially means the government pays half of my wage), I will not qualify for this scheme after this contract, meaning they will need essentially pay twice as much for me.
-My job role here is working with/implementing(into their engine) some specific software. I consult on other projects because of my knowledge of this software.

And if I do get offered a job, What's the best way to ask for a rise? Just ask for a pay review? I feel like my knowledge of their engine and software I have implemented is valuable to the company. Keep in mind what I said above,(from their point of view) They would have to pay me double, when they just could hire someone at half the price and train them up.

How should I approach this?

Thanks

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And if I do get offered a job, What's the best way to ask for a rise? Just ask for a pay review? I feel like my knowledge of their engine and software I have implemented is valuable to the company. Keep in mind what I said above,(from their point of view) They would have to pay me double, when they just could hire someone at half the price and train them up.

How should I approach this?

Thanks

 

This is a contradiction, if your job has the same value as an intern job, then your job has no value at all, but if your job is good enough to be much better than a trainee, then the company is not gonna hire a new person.

 

It's all about maths, it doesn't help I know but this is how it is.

 

One thing you should do is to ask if someone else was on the same situation as you and was hired at the end, one thing a lot of companies usually do here in Spain, is only to hire interns, when the internship is over they just hire another one, is your companie doing the same thing? 

 

Besides, you should do some interviews, not only if your employee doesn't renew your contract, but to have more power in a possible negotiation for getting a raise.

 

Whatever you do, the most important thing is to ask for people who had the same situation as you, that's your best chance to know if you have some real possibility.

Edited by Elegarth

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Thanks for your response, whilst I am at value to the company its hard, from my position, to see if I am valuable enough to justify (essentially) being paid double.

There is nobody else in my position :/

--
Me saying my job has value is saying im not a complete bumbling fool. But could someone learn my knowledge? yes. Could they learn it quicker than I did, now it is fully implemented? Yes(?) Edited by dsm1891

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Elegarth gave you some good advice. I think asking what you want to ask, 3 months in advance, just shows anxiety and there isn't a good way to do that. A better thing to do (and you should have started 6+ months ago) is make yourself more valuable by both the dedication to, and quality of, your work. Your closing sentence suggests that although you're the only one doing what you do, you'd be easy to replace. If you weren't so easy to replace, by your dedication and the spark you add to the team culture, then the added cost of the ending of the government subsidy would be worth it to the company. I don't suppose you'd be very expensive, compared to a new full-timer with experience.

After working harder and efficiently for the next month and a half or so, you can invite the top person to have Starbucks with you, and you can chat with him or her at that point about the upcoming end of the government subsidy and what might become of you. It shouldn't be a pitch or a plea. It should be just a chat, for your own planning purposes. You do have other options, and before your chat you should have a firm idea of those other options. I think some of your present anxiety is due to not knowing about those other options.

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Thanks for the reply. I didn't want to suggest I would be easy to replace or that I don't have good work ethics (dedication / quality of work etc) I just wanted to stress that this is a small company with limited projects. For sure, if this was some multi million global mega corp my situation would be different.

And the fact that if they will have any projects lined up or not adds to my affordability jeopardy. I have also overheard my bosses trying to contact the scheme organisers to see if there was a possibility of extending it past the 12 months. This bold well as it seems they would want to keep me.

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For working hard, that should start from day one.  Always try to add value, at least as much as they're paying you.

 

 

For the questions of WHEN and HOW:  WHEN is three months for me.  HOW is a private conversation with my direct manager, which normally is scheduled every week or two at all the places I've ever worked.

 

The exact details of how depends on the boss I'm working with on the contract.

 

In every case I wait in the one-on-one meeting where we talk about the work and any concerns. After the major items are done and the chitchat has started, I hesitate and say I've got another concern. 

 

The exact words depend on the person.  In essence, I tell the supervisor I've got three months left on the contract. I state that while I do want to keep working for them, my primary need is to provide for my family. I ask for them to please renew the contract, transition me to permanent, or whatever they want, but in order to make sure I can provide for my family, at the two month mark I need to start putting resumes out. I make it clear I'm not trying to risk losing this job, I am trying to ensure I can continue to provide for my family.

 

I make a point that I want to keep working there, just that in looking out for my own interests I need to have a job lined up that starts the day the contract ends. I still want to be there with them, but in one month I'll be inviting the competition to bid for my services.

 

That gives me about two months to find a job.  If you fear it will take longer than two months to find a job, start the process earlier.

 

Then I'll remind them at every one of the next one-on-one meetings.  The next one will be "How is the contract renewal going? Can I continue working here? Do I need to start sending out resumes in two weeks?"   The one after that is "Can I continue working here? How is the renewal going? I've polished up my resumes, I really don't want to have to send them out, do you have an extension I can sign?"  After that "Please tell me the contract renewal is in progress. I've started sending out resumes and I'm not looking forward to having to go through the interview process."  Continuing with stating you really want to stay there, but because they haven't lined anything up you have had interviews, and later that you're on second interviews. Stay on good terms, just keep it clear that you are looking for job continuity. Never make it about the work you are doing or performance or pay, even if the boss tries to suggest others keep returning the discussion entirely on continuity.  You want to ensure that you don't have a break between jobs, and you would love if this job keeps going.

 

If they decide not to renew the contract then you've given then plenty of notice. You can move on to the new job without guilt.  While they could potentially fire you or let you go at that point, as long as you made it clear you were only looking for continuity that is unlikely to happen; they knew when they hired you it had an expiration date, and the date is approaching, you have every right to ensure your own security.

 

And in the best case, if you get a job offer and also an offer to renew the contract, you now are in a position to choose workplaces. DO NOT try to make your current company outbid the other job, counter-offers work out only about 10% of the time, about 90% of the time the person will be laid off or fired before the year is out.  Those are not my own made-up 10/90 percentages, search for "never accept counteroffer" to see various studies.  Between 40-60% are gone within six months, 90% are gone within a year. If you get multiple offers then you can look at them both and decide what you want. But if you decide to stay you need to accept the offer they give rather than play around with a counteroffer. Don't let them question your desire to work with them. If they think you want to leave, they'll dump you on their terms which you probably won't like.

 

 

One alternative that I have seen on more than one occasion is that someone simply stops showing up one day.  The boss has forgotten the end of contract date and the contractor had never really mentioned it. The contract date had expired and they really needed the person, but the person had lined up a job somewhere else and was biding their time until the contract expired.

 

If that is what you want then there is certainly that option, but it tends to burn bridges.  Your old boss will be unhappy that you stopped showing up and likely will give bad feedback in years to come.  

 

Far better to let them know when the time has come, solicit jobs elsewhere, and then EVEN IF YOU ARE LYING THROUGH YOUR TEETH AND HATE THE JOB, tell your boss that while you really want to keep working with them, another company has given you an amazing offer that you cannot turn down. The current job is good, but the future job is something you are passionate about and has intangibles that you will love, so there is no point in giving a counter offer. Don't burn the bridge, because if things don't work out you can come back in three months saying the new job collapsed and you still loved what you did and want to know if they have room back again.

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a possibility of being kept on at the end of my contract (whether that is a rolling contract or full time employee I am unsure).


-This company is very small (but somewhat stable)
-At the moment I am on a government scheme (essentially means the government pays half of my wage), I will not qualify for this scheme after this contract, meaning they will need essentially pay twice as much for me.

,(from their point of view) They would have to pay me double, when they just could hire someone at half the price and train them up.


if your job has the same value as an intern job, then your job has no value at all

one thing a lot of companies usually do here in Spain, is only to hire interns, when the internship is over they just hire another one, is your companie doing the same thing? 


whilst I am at value to the company its hard, from my position, to see if I am valuable enough to justify (essentially) being paid double.


There is nobody else in my position :/


But could someone learn my knowledge? yes. Could they learn it quicker than I did, now it is fully implemented? Yes(?)


Your closing sentence suggests that although you're the only one doing what you do, you'd be easy to replace.


I just wanted to stress that this is a small company with limited projects. For sure, if this was some multi million global mega corp my situation would be different.


And the fact that if they will have any projects lined up or not adds to my affordability jeopardy.


I have also overheard my bosses trying to contact the scheme organisers to see if there was a possibility of extending it past the 12 months. This bold well as it seems they would want to keep me.

 

keep you yes - but at a reduced cost. at full cost? that's anther question.

 

 

based on the excerpts above, i'd say:

1. follow tom's advise and make yourself more valuable.

2. start looking for a new job NOW!

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Frob's advice is spot on, and, hate to say it, but I think Norman's correct. If they're hesitating to hire you at full price by trying to negotiate an extension, they most likely aren't planning to keep you.

 

Start applying/asking around immidiately.

 

I had a friend who got wrapped up/excited about working for a startup on a contract, and was so certain he'd be hired after his 12 month contract that he never looked at other jobs until they let him go (Claimed they couldn't afford him). He didn't save up much money and had to sell his house after not being able to find a job for 3 months.

Always have a backup plan.

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