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describing game objects in GDD

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Hello everyone!

 

I am looking for help!

Currently, I am working on technical specification part of my game design document and I have to describe interactions between all entities in our game. Unfortunately, I have no programming skills and tried to search for some guidelines with examples but no luck.

I have managed to find these so far, but it is still not clear how can I use it in my case. 

http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/131818/the_anatomy_of_a_design_document_.php?page=5

http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/entities-parts-ii-interactions-r3617

 

Is there any other material that can help to understand approach in describing game entities for programmer? 

 

Thank you in advance and sorry for my English.

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Shouldn't a programmer write the tech doc? Write a clear design doc and let the programmer write the tech doc.

Or at the very least do so in collaboration with a programmer (ideally your lead programmer, if you have that as a distinct role in your group). If a non-programmer is going to write the technical document, then it seems like a very good idea to have someone who is familiar with the technical side of both the project and your tools to inform you of how the various elements function and interact, and what is and is not feasible in the context of your project.

 

If you don't yet have a programmer in your group, then it might be worth putting aside the technical document until you've found someone for that role.

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Thanks for suggestions! I have no possibility to communicate with our programmer. The problem is that our game producer considers that describing game entities, their parameters and how they interact with each other is solely task of game designer. And I think I would handle it if I had any complete example.    

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To my mind, the designer not being able to communicate with the programmer/developer is a scary prospect! I'd speak to your producer and get put in touch right away. It's not an unreasonable request.

 

I'd imagine just describing the interactions between the different entities as you see them in your head in plain English would be useful. Just keep it simple and clear for the programmer to follow. Probably common sense and not very useful advice on my part but I'd try your best to get in touch with the programmer! 

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I gotta agree. Cross dept collaboration is important for any team. Communication silos are going to cause more and more problems as the project advances.

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Thanks for suggestions! I have no possibility to communicate with our programmer. The problem is that our game producer considers that describing game entities, their parameters and how they interact with each other is solely task of game designer. And I think I would handle it if I had any complete example.    

Poor you...

 

Well, just write something generic like "player character entity: walk (environment), jump (environment), shot at (entity enemy), open door (environment, key entity required in inventory container)". It will be pretty useless to the programmer but the producer should be happy.

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sound like the producer wants you to simply list the entity types, and what they can do in the game.

 

i'd assume they would then pass those design specs on to the dev team to figure out whats doable and whats not.

 

perhaps confirm with your producer that this is the game plan before proceeding.

 

the siloing might be due to the producer's need to keep tight control over the process for some reason. but it prevents the synergies you get from team interactions between all levels.  uncontrolled interactions can lead to chaos.

 

actually, all of this sounds very scary to me. a producer who doesn't encourage the team talk to each other, a designer who's not sure what to do - how the heck did you become the designer? (nothing personal here - but you see what i mean?).   something smells fishy to me. don't know if its just a case of the blind leading the dead, or perhaps some sort of scam.  maybe i'm just paranoid.   glad its not me, that's all i have to say.

 

a good rule of thumb, whenever in doubt about an assignment, its always good practice to go to one's superior for guidance. it shows you want to get the job done, and done "right" (whatever your boss's definition of that is). those types of employees get descriptions like "self starter - takes initiative". - a highly prized quality in any employee.

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