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Unsure between 2 books

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Hello, I'm looking to buy a single book that can teach me the ropes to C++ and OOP  in general.
Having done my research, I got the list narrowed to only two books:
- Programming : Principles and Practice Using C++, Bjarne Stroustrup;
- C++ Primer,  Stanley B. Lippman, Josee Lajoie and Barbara E. Moo.
 
Some more information that can probably help you is the fact that I'm currently in university and grasp the very basics of languages like Python, C, Scheme and Java (the one I know least).
Put that, which of these books would suit me best?
 
Thanks in advance.

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I've not had any personal experience with those books.
 
However, my favorite book combo for C++, learning the mind set for programming and OOP  is:
 
 
For all the basics and,
 
 
For the more advanced stuff.  Glen Rowe was also the lecturer who came before my lecturer at my University!
 
Both books taught me very well and I can't recommend them more highly!
 
P.S. if you wan't to get really deep into OOP design, check out Head First Object-orientated Analysis and Design (O'reilly) and Applying UML and Patterns: An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development by Craig Larman. There's also literally any books by Steve Mcconnell, namely Code Complete 2, which will serve you very well.
 
I use all these books for reference.
Edited by Mark Lock

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Hello, I'm looking to buy a single book that can teach me the ropes to C++ and OOP  in general.
Having done my research, I got the list narrowed to only two books:
- Programming : Principles and Practice Using C++, Bjarne Stroustrup;
- C++ Primer,  Stanley B. Lippman, Josee Lajoie and Barbara E. Moo.
 
Some more information that can probably help you is the fact that I'm currently in university and grasp the very basics of languages like Python, C, Scheme and Java (the one I know least).
Put that, which of these books would suit me best?
 
Thanks in advance.

 

 

Both are good books. C++ Primer (_not_ Primer Plus!) is what my alma mater used for its C/C++ courses. Stroustrup's book is also excellent, given that Stroustrup both created C++ and spent years teaching it.

 

Ultimately, I feel in cases like these it comes down to personal learning style. If you can, read a sample chapter from each and see which makes the most sense to you.

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I would personally recommend Accelerated C++ over C++ Primer (more details here) but everyone has their own preferences for book lists.

 

Of those two, C++ Primer is likely the better book for for an introduction.  Earlier editions of PPP were once recommended, but it is aimed at the absolute beginner, is wordy and a bit confusing at times. It is good, but there are better books.

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For best practices i think Effective C++ is superior.

Melkon if you mean the one by Scott Meyers it wont teach singlestring the ropes of c++ as asked it will teach good practices

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I've not had any personal experience with those books.
 
However, my favorite book combo for C++, learning the mind set for programming and OOP  is:
 
 
For all the basics and,
 
 
For the more advanced stuff.  Glen Rowe was also the lecturer who came before my lecturer at my University!
 
Both books taught me very well and I can't recommend them more highly!
 
P.S. if you wan't to get really deep into OOP design, check out Head First Object-orientated Analysis and Design (O'reilly) and Applying UML and Patterns: An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development by Craig Larman. There's also literally any books by Steve Mcconnell, namely Code Complete 2, which will serve you very well.
 
I use all these books for reference.

 

 

These are all great books indeed, the only I would add is Thinking in C++, by Bruce Eckel. Also, if you want, visit Contrux.com, some of the best books in many programming areas are included in their plans.

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