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Unity Creating my own android games, where do I start?

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Hello! I'm new here. I have been interested in creating my own android games for a time now and just decided to give it a try, so I'm looking for a software where I can develop my games.

I have some basic knowledge in java and been playing around a bit in Android Studio. What would be the easiest way for a beginner to create his first android game? At the start, now when I'm new to app development, I will make simple games like memory match or quiz game, and after that try creating games that require some physics, like a "runner game" or platform game.

I have found three options:
-Android Studio
-Unity3d
-Game Maker: studio

Does any of you have any idea what software to use? Are any of these three options any good? I have also heard it might be possible to use Android Studio as a plugin for Unity3d or something like that... I just want to create simple 2D-games, not any advanced 3D-games. Any help is greatly appreciated! Thanks!

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For Android Studio, start here, the guide includes downloading and setting up the environment and building a simple program.
 
For Unity, you need to download the system, install it, and go through several of the tutorials, whatever topic you want to learn.

 

 

Android Studio requires more work on your behalf since you are building most of the code yourself.  You either need to build all the libraries yourself or use other third-party libraries for everything.

 

Unity starts with a full-featured engine that can look pretty out of the box, you need to add the logic behind the objects.

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For Android Studio, start here, the guide includes downloading and setting up the environment and building a simple program.
 
For Unity, you need to download the system, install it, and go through several of the tutorials, whatever topic you want to learn.

 

 

Android Studio requires more work on your behalf since you are building most of the code yourself.  You either need to build all the libraries yourself or use other third-party libraries for everything.

 

Unity starts with a full-featured engine that can look pretty out of the box, you need to add the logic behind the objects.

Thanks for the answer! Are there good enough third party libraries for Android Studio to make it more efficient than Unity? Or should I just go with Unity since all the game engine stuff are already there?

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More efficient in what way?  Unity is a big engine, it does a lot of work.  You can use the 2D functionality to build your 2D game, but it will come with a lot of additional stuff.  The 2D functionality is 3D with a constrained view. 

 

You can use other libraries like cocos-2dx to do the graphics work, and probably want some libraries for audio, but you'll need to do much more effort on your own to bring them in.  

 

Unity gives you convenience at the expense of having some things you won't use. 

 

Doing it yourself means smaller packages with only the things you use, but it takes more effort on your part.

 

 

If your goal is to make a runner or platform game, do you really want to spend your time hunting down graphics libraries and audio libraries, writing or hunting down filesystem commands and math libraries and resource caches and physics controllers and scene importers and font generators and resource packers and debugging tools?

 

You can do it, and if you want to learn all the parts then by all means do so. But most people prefer to spend the time doing the minimal amount of work.

 

 

 

If you were building a UI-only game like 2048 or something then using the direct Java API is the smart way to go.

 

If you were build something turn-based that maps directly to the OS-provided tools for viewing data, something that uses layouts and buttons and input controls and menus and system-provided dialogs, then Android Studio and direct programming is going to be the best route.

 

But if you're building a platformer or an endless runner or similar graphical game that is completely removed from what the OS gives you directly, an existing engine will be much simpler to develop with.

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I recommend GameMaker Studio for many people.  The engine is (for most people) easier to use, as long as your interests lie in 2d, and will likely stay that way.  It is usually pretty quick to use, and the performance is good too.  It also has other options for exports as well.  The down side is that you have to actually pay for it if you want it.  The free version does not include the Android export.  For me, the price is worth it.

 

Unity is a different beast.  I wouldn't recommend it for 2d, but for 3d, I would very much so recommend it.  It also has the advantage that the current free version(now called personal edition) is totally free, basically everything you could want, including Android export, all free.  The catch is that your game has to show the "personal edition" splash screen, which many on the Unity forums have complained about, saying they wouldn't mind a Unity splash, but the fact that it has the word "personal" is somehow important.  The other catch to the free version is that your company(maybe just you alone in this case) can't make more than $100,000 a year.  I understand it only refers to what you make using Unity, not like if you work in something else.  Honestly though, that would be a good problem to have.

 

Now, to compare.  If you want 2d and only 2d, GMS will probably be better overall.  It is quicker and easier to use, and since it is fully dedicated to 2d, it has better 2d features that Unity lacks.  It is also not as bulky as Unity, which refers to build sizes and scripting complexity.  Unity uses C# though, which has some advantages over the GML language that GMS uses for scripting, but by the same token, Unity brings some complications.

 

One last pair of things to consider.  Maybe not now, but in the future, how likely would you be interested in 3d game development, PC or Android even?  If you think you might be interested, you might be better off investing your time in Unity.  GMS's 3d is still quite lacking, just like Unity is lacking in 2d, though I think Unity's 2d has more features than GMS's 3d(at least as it comes from the factory), though in both engines things can be coded, leading to possibilities of realistic PBR shaders in GMS, and really nice tile engine(etc...) in Unity, that neither has "out of the box."  Of course, there is nothing wrong with eventually learning and using both, and this applies to other tools as well.  The best programmer or gamedev in the end tends to be the one that simply uses the best tool for the job, as seen by said person.  This includes what someone is capable of as well as how applicable the engine is to the game, so for some people, it means that Unity is just too complex for them to learn, and for other people, even for 2d games, it is a waste of time to learn GMS.

 

I currently have worked with both, and have invested in GMS: Master Collection.  I honestly haven't done much with said investment though.  I haven't invested near as much in Unity, though I spent $100 for ShaderForge from the Asset Store(great product too).  I haven't really done much with other tools, except a small bit of dabbling, so I don't have any opinions on them for the most part.  Some people swear by what they use so it wouldn't surprise me if you hit it off better with something else.

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