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Flavors of Basic?

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I''m wondering what flavors of basic are around for use or Demo use. I know about DarkBasic. Does anyone know where someone could get QuickBasic 4.5 for free?? What about others?? My son is 10 and already getting interested in programming, but I''d prefer to start him out with a Basic language for structure and then work into C and then into an Object language. We homeschool so this is essentially his teacher speaking . Anyway, all help would be appreciated. Thanks, BeS It''s Da BOMB Baby!!! . o O ~ A little nonsense now and then, is relished by the wisest men ~ O o . -- Willy Wonka

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This has nothing to do with the topic, but I thought I'd write a response anyway. I want to tell you good luck with your homeschooling experience. I was homeschooled and picked up my interest in programming from another homeschooler. I took what I learned and am currently in college majoring in computer science. Good luck!!

Edited by - chillah on November 14, 2001 3:35:27 PM

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Don''t learn him on basic first. Basic''s just a breeding ground for bad programming habits. You can always tell someone who learned on basic, even when they''re programming in C. There''s no shaking the basic ''accent.''

C is just as good for a procedureal/structured programming language. And if you really want a language specifically designed for students, I''d recommend pascal over basic any day of the week.

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Don't learn him on basic first. Basic's just a breeding ground for bad programming habits. You can always tell someone who learned on basic, even when they're programming in C. There's no shaking the basic 'accent.'

C is just as good for a procedureal/structured programming language. And if you really want a language specifically designed for students, I'd recommend pascal over basic any day of the week.


Any free versions of pascal available?? Any good books you know about??

:EDIT:
If you haven't figured out, I want to start out free.

B e S
It's Da BOMB Baby!!!
. o O ~
A little nonsense now and then,
is relished by the wisest men
~ O o .
-- Willy Wonka



Edited by - wrenhal on November 14, 2001 3:49:41 PM

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Check out http://www.freepascal.org/

I understand that ''learn pascal in 3 days'' is a good intro book. And Amazon is selling it for $21, I see.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
go to www.blitzbasic.com . Much better than darkbasic. Blitz 2d has a free unlimited demo which should be perfect for the kid, and it also has a little bit of oop commands for learning a little later down the road.

I suggest trying it out a little while, and if you like it, the full blitz 2d version is only about 20-30 bucks. You could essentially keep the demo forever...but it''s always polite to register something you are gonna use a long time.

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Basic IS the way to learn to program. It''s far easier to learn
if a = b then
rather than
if (a := b) or something like that
you "can''t" get qbasic 4.5 for free. Though if you were to "accidentally" hit a few buttons and punch it into a search engine, a few downloads would pop up.

PaladinGLT

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For a free pascal compiler, you can''t go wrong with Borland''s Delphi 6 Personal(it is FREE!!!). Head over to Borland and download it.

If you have a Win98 CD, QBasic comes with it. Just search the CD. If i remember correctly, its in a folder called \Tools.

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quote:

There''s no shaking the basic ''accent.''



Hey! I learned on GWBASIC, and I had Quickbasic 4.5, and I have no such accent.

What about Qbasic, its free and it comes on your windows CD. It doesn''t compile like QuickBasic, but otherwise its very similar. Personally though, I would start your son out on java instead. Basic is archaic, and there are lots of free java ide''s at java.sun.com, including borland jbuilder and sun''s forte.

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quote:
Basic IS the way to learn to program. It''s far easier to learn
if a = b then
rather than
if (a := b) or something like that
you "can''t" get qbasic 4.5 for free. Though if you were to "accidentally" hit a few buttons and punch it into a search engine, a few downloads would pop up.

hey paladin, this is children_mcnuggets from XGP

actually in pascal, conditional statements are like if (a = b), only variables are assigned with :=
the conditional statements are pretty much the same as basic

personally, i''d teach him either C or Pascal, they are both great languages, c took me a little longer to grasp than pascal

freepascal.org used to have some links to some great IDE''s besides dev-pascal, but i cant seem to find them, i remember one having a look and feel of MSVC++, with the class browser and all

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Don''t learn him on basic first. Basic''s just a breeding ground for bad programming habits. You can always tell someone who learned on basic, even when they''re programming in C. There''s no shaking the basic ''accent.''

C is just as good for a procedureal/structured programming language. And if you really want a language specifically designed for students, I''d recommend pascal over basic any day of the week.


If I showed you some of my code, you couldn''t tell what langage I started out with. Anyhow, that''s not the point but I felt a response was in order.



"And that''s the bottom line cause I said so!"

Cyberdrek
Headhunter Soft
A division of DLC Multimedia

Resist Windows XP''s Invasive Production Activation Technology!

"gitty up" -- Kramer

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quote:
Original post by wrenhal
I'm wondering what flavors of basic are around for use or Demo use. I know about DarkBasic. Does anyone know where someone could get QuickBasic 4.5 for free?? What about others?? My son is 10 and already getting interested in programming, but I'd prefer to start him out with a Basic language for structure and then work into C and then into an Object language. We homeschool so this is essentially his teacher speaking .
Anyway, all help would be appreciated.

Thanks,


QuickBasic 4.5 was never free. Qbasic ( the brother of QuickBasic ) came with dos 5.0 and up but you didn't get the compiler, that's why they called it Qbasic. QuickBasic was a package that you needed to buy. Also, the version 7.1 was called QBX for extended, it has a stronger compiler that didn't have any line limitations. As for where you could find it, might want to do a search for clones or something like that on google. You could probably find a QuickBasic one somewhere... I'm sure somebody made one, I'd bet my house, if I had one...


You can check here. You might find something that you want... ( XBasic seems like a good choice, it's a windows basic that reminds me a bit of C )

"And that's the bottom line cause I said so!"

Cyberdrek
Headhunter Soft
A division of DLC Multimedia

Resist Windows XP's Invasive Production Activation Technology!

"gitty up" -- Kramer

Edited by - cyberdrek on November 14, 2001 9:03:58 PM

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quote:
Original post by Stoffel
10 This hogwash about BASIC
20 causing programmers to form bad habits
30 is just a bunch of bologna.


You forgot:

40 goto 10
run

hehehe...


"And that''s the bottom line cause I said so!"

Cyberdrek
Headhunter Soft
A division of DLC Multimedia

Resist Windows XP''s Invasive Production Activation Technology!

"gitty up" -- Kramer

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quote:

10 This hogwash about BASIC
20 causing programmers to form bad habits
30 is just a bunch of bologna.



And you forgot that current implementations of basic do not force you to use line numbers.

The language really doesn''t matter, it is more the thinking which is involved. Problems in programming don''t usually come in terms of the language syntax, but more in the form of the design of an algorithm. The syntax is clearly defined, but there are no right and wrong solutions to problems.

Even though the QBasic which comes with Windows is only an interpreter, it is great for learning on (I taught myself programming using QBasic and the QBasic help file.... unfortunately I learnt some pretty bad habits... gosubs, no indents, no comments. But as soon as I started seeing other peoples code when I finally got access to the internet, I cleaned it up totally and now you wouldn''t know that I was like that before). And you can fake stand alone apps by using "System" instead of "End", and then making a batch file:

Qbasic /run:blah.bas

(I think that was the syntax, something like that). This will load up QBasic, run blah.bas, and when it gets to the "System" line, it will exit your program and exit QBasic.

Trying is the first step towards failure.

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Back to the subject of flavors of Basic for learning to program, if you're reading this message in Windows Internet Explorer, chances are your browser already supports VBScript for free. VBScript is essentially a scriptable subset of VB. Depending on the version of VBScript (IE4 = VBScript2, IE5 = VBScript5), VBScript5 supports classes.

Granted you will have to learn a little about DHTML too to get your programs working in a web page but that's no bad thing. I would recommend hiding DHTML from the pupil to start with by getting the pupil to code in an include file, perhaps using HTML form input and textareas for input and output. There's plenty of VBScript tutorials on the web. Microsoft's web site also has a script debugger.

Alternatively, you could take the same browser-based approach, but bite the bullet and choose java-script instead. This has the benefit of platform independence, better OO, more power, its a true web delivery platform supported by most browsers, and there's even more tutorials/samples on the web. If you are using Microsoft's IE and JScript you can still use Microsoft's script debugger.

You will need a text editor too, preferably one that displays what is the current line number, although you could use notepad at a push.

Not bad for free, and as well as gaining programming experience the pupil will also get a taste of web development.

Edited by - abstractworlds on November 15, 2001 6:36:02 AM

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Can''t go wrong with a BBC micro.... as long as you like 15 colours (3 are flashing variations of the others), tape drives (and the wonderful block errors that come with them), discovering that your Arcadians game on tape is in fact a younger, more innocent version of you, singing "posta pat" and having to change the batteries to stop its memory from being wiped when the power dies....

--Cirian

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