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Beginner - Looking for something specific

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Hi Guys, 

 

I'm looking to create a game, but I'm looking for something in particular from it. I'm obviously a beginner so you'll have to excuse layman terms; but I'm going to give you a scenario as it's the only way I can think to describe and convey what it is I'm looking for.

 

I'm looking to create a thief type game, and just like in any of the elder scrolls games, or the "Thief" games I'm looking to create a mini game where-by a lock whether digital (for passcodes) or analogue (mechanical) appears in some sort of overlay with various functionality. I'm also looking to grow it, so that various lock breaking tools can be selected.  

 

Now I'm sure I'm going to get blasted with warnings like "That's for L33T's only!" or "You should start with something simpler! For now just focus on making a basic character" and I completely understand where people that may say that are coming from. But here's the thing, I don't mind the learning curve, and all I want to know is what software can I get, preferably for free of course, that would allow me to do that; and if anyone has any idea how to do it, then how would I do it?

 

SlipSpace

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Generally available software tends to be quite general. The whole idea of such software is that a lot of people use it, which means it has to be usable for a wide range of problems. That said, there is a whole lot of game development software aimed at specific areas or types of games.

Maybe you can tailor such software towards your ideas more easily.

 

I have very little knowledge if this area, but Adventure Game Studio (AGS) comes to mind, a program to write point & click adventures (where your room is probable a single-ish screen with a watch). More generic is Game Maker, but I don't know if that would be usable for you. You can even consider Scratch, which is aimed at young children to learn programming.

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You have a clear target ahead of you and it is very good as it will let you focus on some less exiting stuff before you could make your dream game yourself.

Unfortunately there are no shortcuts. Programming is an ability to connect unrelated pieces of code to make something working. Without knowing those pieces you won't be able to achieve much.

 

If you hadn't already, you should read the FAQ. Then I would start with python. There are great free books on http://inventwithpython.com/ that focus on creating simple games. Python is also free and that is all you need at start.

 

Just one thing - as you read through the books, after every chapter think how you can use that knowledge in your game. In what part it could fit? What problem it could solve? Do it regardless of how simple or abstract the chapter was.

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what software can I get, preferably for free of course, that would allow me to do that

 

a wide variety of languages, libraries and / or engines could do this. 

 

what's right for you will depend on:

A. what you already are familiar with

B. whether this is ultimately for profit or not. if so, some tools may not really be powerful enough to make a commercial grade game. they may be ok for learning and prototyping, but not for release.

 

 

 


and if anyone has any idea how to do it, then how would I do it?

 

in skyrim, for example, the mouse rotates a pick. the angle of the pick is compared to the "sweet spot" angle of the lock.  a certain amount of plus or minus fudge factor is allowed, based on the lock level. if the player holds W, the lock is turned, and if the pick is close enough to the sweet spot angle, it opens. example: all locks have a random sweet spot from -90 to 90 degrees. novice locks might have a fudge factor of +/- 20 degrees, while expert locks might have a fudge factor of just +/- 2 degrees.   the closer you are to the sweet spot, the more the lock turns before breaking the pick. i suspect that picks have hit points, and the longer you turn the lock and farther you are from the sweet spot, the faster the picks takes damage.

 

the first step is to put on your game designer's hat, and come up with how you want to model lock picking in _YOUR_ game.   then find a language/library/engine that can do that - and can do everything else you want to do in the game. then figure out how to implement your design using the chosen tools.  only then do you dust off the keyboard and get down to coding and such.

Edited by Norman Barrows

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the first step is to put on your game designer's hat, and come up with how you want to model lock picking in _YOUR_ game.


I agree with Norman on this one. If you haven't gotten the mechanics of how you want lock picking to work, then how will you choose a library or engine to implement it?

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