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Hello! Where To Start C++

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hi guys, i am new on this site and i have some question for youu.

 

I have learned c# for 2 year at high school but we just learned basics for example the last thing i have learned is overload etc. and database

so  i dont have an idea about graphics , sfml etc.

 

I have just learned sytanxes on c++, I have to start from somewhere but i dont know how to do it.

 

what should i learn before 2d programming ?

 

which library do you prefer on 2d programming ?

 

which way should i follow to learn game programming ?

 

i just need to know where to start and a Master.

 

 

Thanks for help, sorry for bad english 

Edited by MrMato

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SFML.Net is very good stuff, the c++ version is good too but it would be unnecessary to learn a whole new language. Stick with C#. You can use SFML to make a game, however you'd then not have the level design tools that you will probably need. Therefore I suggest using Unity. You can script unity in c# and of course use the editor for making your game levels. Also Unity has a nice OOP component based design that will probably teach you good programming habits.

 

There are lots of learning resources for unity including the learn page on there site, and hundreds of books.

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Thanks for your comments, you guys really help me but

 

Why i want to learn c++ ?

 

once i spoke with a programmer who is lead programmer in io interactive he works on hitman

 

he said " it's not important if you know a language very well  it's all about time, learn c++ ,give yourself a deadline , make a pacman game if you can do it on the time 

 

you are on right way " 

 

i just need to learn syntaxes  because i am already know logical things for loop,while,overload,class etc.

 

it wouldnt be very hard for me 

 

this year i am going to study computer engineering at university, i want to learn game programming as  a professional,i must  be able to work in a game company etc.

 

so tell me again ? should i go with c# or  should i learn c++ and sfml etc ?

 

Thanks for help

Edited by MrMato

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You should stick with C# and use it to actually make games. Making games is more important.

 

Learning C++ is not just about learning the new syntax; it helps that you know a programming language to some extent already, but C++ involves a very different collection of concepts and practices than C# does. It would be useful for you to know C++ eventually if you want to work in the games industry at a studio that uses primarily C++, but it's far more important for your ability growth to be able to make actual completed games and practice with those processes and paradigms.

Edited by Josh Petrie

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If you want to learn C++ I stronlgy suggest Sams Teach yourself C++

 

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=sams+teach+yourself+c%2B%2B

 

There are different books varying in density depending on how deeply you want to go with the language. The important thing is picking up programming concepts that will allow you to learn other languages with relative ease. I can't help much with the programming games specifically bit, but I've used the Sams Teach Yourself for review, and things are explained rather clearly in the texts.

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If you want to learn C++ I stronlgy suggest Sams Teach yourself C++

 

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=sams+teach+yourself+c%2B%2B

 

There are different books varying in density depending on how deeply you want to go with the language. The important thing is picking up programming concepts that will allow you to learn other languages with relative ease. I can't help much with the programming games specifically bit, but I've used the Sams Teach Yourself for review, and things are explained rather clearly in the texts.

thanks for your advice !!

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You should stick with C# and use it to actually make games. Making games is more important.

 

Learning C++ is not just about learning the new syntax; it helps that you know a programming language to some extent already, but C++ involves a very different collection of concepts and practices than C# does. It would be useful for you to know C++ eventually if you want to work in the games industry at a studio that uses primarily C++, but it's far more important for your ability growth to be able to make actual completed games and practice with those processes and paradigms.

so i need to learn games logic ok.where should i begin on c#,do i need to learn something before graphic libraries ? which library do you prefer 

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You should stick with C# and use it to actually make games. Making games is more important.

 

Learning C++ is not just about learning the new syntax; it helps that you know a programming language to some extent already, but C++ involves a very different collection of concepts and practices than C# does. It would be useful for you to know C++ eventually if you want to work in the games industry at a studio that uses primarily C++, but it's far more important for your ability growth to be able to make actual completed games and practice with those processes and paradigms.

so i need to learn games logic ok.where should i begin on c#,do i need to learn something before graphic libraries ? which library do you prefer 

 

Again I suggest learning an engine. This is because without an engine, you will have to develop tools for yourself. Such as level editors/loaders, resource managers ect..., it's almost always useful to "USE" an engine first, because then you see how these things are designed in good systems. Later if you wish to continue learn you can try developing your own systems and the knowledge you picked up from "using" engines will carry over nicely.

 

Unity is fully scriptable in C# along with the mono/.net libaries are available, which means you can use and learn .net in the process.

 

One last reason is the cross platform build tools, with unity you can deploy to nearly any platform with just a few clicks.

Edited by EddieV223

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SFML.net was suggested before. Try that. And try to make Pong. There are plenty of tutorials to create that. For more game ideas, check out the link in my signature below.

your article is the answer of my question thanks !!! 

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You should stick with C# and use it to actually make games. Making games is more important.

 

Learning C++ is not just about learning the new syntax; it helps that you know a programming language to some extent already, but C++ involves a very different collection of concepts and practices than C# does. It would be useful for you to know C++ eventually if you want to work in the games industry at a studio that uses primarily C++, but it's far more important for your ability growth to be able to make actual completed games and practice with those processes and paradigms.

so i need to learn games logic ok.where should i begin on c#,do i need to learn something before graphic libraries ? which library do you prefer 

 

Again I suggest learning an engine. This is because without an engine, you will have to develop tools for yourself. Such as level editors/loaders, resource managers ect..., it's almost always useful to "USE" an engine first, because then you see how these things are designed in good systems. Later if you wish to continue learn you can try developing your own systems and the knowledge you picked up from "using" engines will carry over nicely.

 

Unity is fully scriptable in C# along with the mono/.net libaries are available, which means you can use and learn .net in the process.

 

One last reason is the cross platform build tools, with unity you can deploy to nearly any platform with just a few clicks.

 

ok i understand but firstly i must learn little bit c# codes for games after that i will be able to write script on unity and make a better game,i am afraid of after 4 years later they say "you dont know c++" etc thats why i am questioning too much , thanks !!!!

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Before start programming games, put one thing on you head: Forget Super Mario games.
Start programming Pong or Asteroid, because if you want start program a big game, certainly you will want give up because is to hard start a project  without knowledge 

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Before start programming games, put one thing on you head: Forget Super Mario games.
Start programming Pong or Asteroid, because if you want start program a big game, certainly you will want give up because is to hard start a project  without knowledge 

 

Thanks for advice !! i want to start from zero,so step by step.....

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No, it's a data structure to find data ordered by position.

 

There is a whole body of ideas and solutions of how to go about solving problems you may encounter in a game, right up to scientific research complexity.

It's fun to read about them (at least I find that). Browse through the articles here, and no doubt you will find some articles interesting.

On the other hand, they tend to assume other knowledge, address problems you don't have today, and even may never have.

 

What I find hard in game programming is to stay focused. The world is a big place with so many ideas and problems, it's easy to spend your time doing anything else than what you really wanted to do.

 

Time is precious, spend it wisely smile.png  (As you can see, I am still working on this one.)

Quadtrees and A* don't go away, there is no real need to study it now, it will still be here when you run into the problem that it aims to solve.

Edited by Alberth

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Quadtrees and A* don't go away, there is no real need to study it now, it will still be here when you run into the problem that it aims to solve.

But reading about this type of stuff does give hints about what programmer think about a well, which to me is good insight for the present.

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