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Hello Gamedev,

I'm interested in game development, but instead of working on a simplistic game as a first project I thought I would remake certain scenes from games(most likely the first boss fight from Secret of Mana) I have programming experience already and I was planning on using Unity. Would any other engine be useful for this and would Blender be efficient enough for a 3d remake or should I use 3dsmax(someone is offering to pay for it, but if blender works I would rather not use their money)

As for music I have FL Studio, but I've seen a lot of game music being made with Able ton. Is there any benefit to using Ableton over FL Studio?

Lastly, if I am proud of what I created and decided to share it on YouTube, could Square Enix issue a copyright claim even though it wasn't monetized?

Thank you for your time Gamedev!

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Blender should be good enough for your needs.

 

If you're using anyone's copyright, then they can issue a copyright claim regardless of monetization. It's the law.

 

Although, from what I've seen, most, if any, don't chase down people showcasing skills or hobby project. However, to reiterate, if they wanted to, they still have the legal right to.

 

If you're thinking about distributing the game/demo itself, be ready for the cease-and-desist letter.

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I was planning on using Unity. Would any other engine be useful for this and would Blender be efficient enough for a 3d remake or should I use 3dsmax(someone is offering to pay for it, but if blender works I would rather not use their money)

As for music I have FL Studio, but I've seen a lot of game music being made with Able ton. Is there any benefit to using Ableton over FL Studio?

Lastly, if I am proud of what I created and decided to share it on YouTube, could Square Enix issue a copyright claim even though it wasn't monetized?


Please compartmentalize your questions. Your first question belongs here in For Beginners. Your second question belongs in Music And Sound. Your third question belongs in Business And Law.

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Never, ever, EVER "recreate" or "borrow" Stuff from other games unless you can get a permission from the copyright holder to do it, which will msot likely cost you a lot of money and you also need to have a name they will recognize as they don't hand out licences to just about everyone.

 

Come up with your own, original idea. That way you sidestep all potential legal problems, and you can be even more proud of the result.

 

 

That being said, "recreating" the first boss fight can be done without blatant IP infringement. Change characters, change names, make sure your result looks different enough. That way you basically created a new product even if some attacks and character resemble FF characters/attacks, and the fight system is more or less the same.

 

You will NOT get additional Kudos for "staying true to an original", quite the opposite, in game dev circles. In the best case they canno really tell what you did yourself and what you just ripped from the original game... in the worst case you look like a shady person infringing other peoples IP to them.

 

 

So... just don't.

 

 

Having said that, Unity is a fine engine for people starting with 3D game development, as is Unreal Engine 4 (even though personally, I found Unity easier to start in, even though for me at least unreal has its own distinct advantages)...

If you interest at the moment lies more with 2D games, you might also want to check out other, 2D specific engines like Game Maker. they tend to be easier to get into than 3D engines that also do 2D like Unity (or Unreal Engine).

 

Of course, Unity and Unreal Engine are currently in high demand in Indie circles, so learning to use these engines in the will hardly be wasted... just prepare for a steeper learning curve.

 

 

Music: as long as you are not a pro, I guess you will not see MUCH difference between music software... I certainly wouldn't pay a high price for such a piece of software unless you have the skills to use it or the time to aquire them. So the better question would be: does your current music production software have any deficiencies that are stopping you from using it? Or are you just hoping for a different tool to be so much easier to use that it could be seen as the magical silver bullet?

 

As Tom said though, there is a special subforum for the sound guys, you will get much more helpful answers there...

 

 

On the topic of the 3D Modelling tools: did you give Blender a spin? Its actually suprisingly powerful and there is virtually nothing you cannot do in Blender that you can in other tools. 

Just be aware of two things:

1) Blenders UI is quirky to say the least... you will need a cheat sheet with all the key shortcuts on hand, as many things can only be done with said shortcuts. Having said that, I do not expect 3DS Max to be much better. I have some expierience in Maya which, to me, is actually WORSE in this matter than Blender: you get menu items for everything, but often no shortcuts. Things like navigating the viewport, translations, rotations and zooms become extremly laborious because of that. Blenders system is not perfect, but actually quite usable once you get used to it.

2) Blender has a small weakness in that is does not allow you to edit Vertex normals, and is not able to save vertex normals. Vertex normals get calculated upon export to a file format that does support vertex normals.

Now, that isn't too bad, Vertex normals are only really usefull for smooth shading, and even then only under certain conditions will you see that Models from Blender will not be as nicely smooth shaded like models with correct vertex normals created in other 3D packages, but there is one thing you need to take note of: If you take a model created in a different modelling app that has smooth shading and uses vertex normals and import it to Blender, your smooth shading will be f***ed up afterwards as Blender will discard the vertex normals, and create new ones upon export, which will change the way the model is smooth shaded.

Edited by Gian-Reto

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I'm interested in game development, but instead of working on a simplistic game as a first project I thought I would remake certain scenes from games(most likely the first boss fight from Secret of Mana)

The whole point of remaking retro games, is to learn what you need to do to make a game from start to finish. Making only the parts you liked, will not teach you about the tedious parts of game development.

However I believe that if you remake at least one of every key feature -walking, talking, exploring a map, a town, entering a building, trading, saving, Mode 7- and such then you can still use it to learn all parts of game development. 

Kind of like a small summery of a the game.

 

 

 


Would any other engine be useful for this

Unity is one of the easiest to learn, however importing assets into unity can be a pain.

Unreal has a cleaner workflow and better tools to repair importing problems and as a 3D modeler I prefer it over Unity. Unreal, isn't beginner friendly, if you keep at it you will master it over time.

 

 

 


would Blender be efficient enough for a 3d remake or should I use 3dsmax(someone is offering to pay for it, but if blender works I would rather not use their money)

 

I want to clear this up, as a 3d modeling tool Blender is equal if not better than Max.

 

Blender focuses a lot on shortcut keys and results in a much faster and almost automatic work flow. It's like playing a FPS on your computer for the first time, it takes you a while to learn the keys but once you know where they are it starts to make sense.

With each release of Blender new modeling tools are added, small things like quick selections for different kinds of loops, quick bridging and different ways to add cuts. All kinds of small and often used tools that I miss when using Max.

 

What 3dsMax is better at is animations and rendering. The most annoying thing about Blenders animations is that when you use IK rigs and change a animation, it causes a ripple effect in all animations. 

However for the animations you will be making for games, this wont matter much as you will break animations into actions. Also Blender developers are working on the animations system as I type this.

 

Rendering won't matter, your game engine will do it's own rendering. Even if you want to do your own cut scenes, Blender will work for the things that you can do as a indie developer.

 

 

In short if you pay for 3dsMax because you want to make games, you will pay a lot for a tool, that you only use a very small part of. When there is a tool that not only has what you need, it's also extremely good at the job you will mostly use it for.

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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2) Blender has a small weakness in that is does not allow you to edit Vertex normals, and is not able to save vertex normals. Vertex normals get calculated upon export to a file format that does support vertex normals.
Now, that isn't too bad, Vertex normals are only really usefull for smooth shading, and even then only under certain conditions will you see that Models from Blender will not be as nicely smooth shaded like models with correct vertex normals created in other 3D packages, but there is one thing you need to take note of: If you take a model created in a different modelling app that has smooth shading and uses vertex normals and import it to Blender, your smooth shading will be f***ed up afterwards as Blender will discard the vertex normals, and create new ones upon export, which will change the way the model is smooth shaded.

I remember reading that Blender had a work around for this the Normal Edit . http://wiki.blender.org/index.php/Dev:Ref/Release_Notes/2.74/Modeling

The .fbx supports it you just need to turn smoothing to Face when exporting.

 

Besides It's only a problem when you have quirky edge flow or making very low poly models for a engine that doesn't support normal maps; some fake subsurface shaders also need it.

If you want more help with this start a topic in visual arts.

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I remember reading that Blender had a work around for this the Normal Edit . http://wiki.blender.org/index.php/Dev:Ref/Release_Notes/2.74/Modeling

The .fbx supports it you just need to turn smoothing to Face when exporting.

 

Besides It's only a problem when you have quirky edge flow or making very low poly models for a engine that doesn't support normal maps; some fake subsurface shaders also need it.

If you want more help with this start a topic in visual arts.

 

 

Aha, the last time I gave it a try was when Blender 2.68 was the latest version... so finally somebody did put a solution into Blender for that.

 

Thanks for the link. That might see me cancel my Maya Sub and go back to Blender if it does work for me (as Maya just is a PAIN to navigate and use...)

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Hello Gamedev,

I'm interested in game development, but instead of working on a simplistic game as a first project...

 

Always start with a simplistic and achievable project. 

It's always the best way to cement your learning and really understand the fundamentals.

 

Re-creating existing work is a good way to learn IMO - just don't redistribute as your own.

 

 

I'm not a great fan of Unity as I prefer UE4 with C++. Epic and others have a lot of tutorial series for making different types of games.

https://www.youtube.com/user/UnrealDevelopmentKit/playlists

Edited by Syntac_

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