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L.Liu

Resources on Creating Games for Non-Programmer's or New Designers?

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L.Liu    114

Hey guys,

 

Finally decided to learn how to make a game but I don't really understand what to do. my question is summed below.

 

I realize video games require programming, however I'm not too interested in spending hours covering programming. I had programmed in python during a CS class before, and with a peer, made a simple visual novel. We didn't use an engine like RenPy; neither of us were well informed on how people made games so we made it from scratch.

 

Post class, I am not too invested in getting proficient in programming, not exactly. I'm not saying I wont program at all. I intend to cover C# and C++ a bit. I think it's ideal I learn the language and be able to read it if I intend to rely on it.

 

This is a hurdle for me at the moment; I want to make a game that is interactive as a learning project. I haven't used engines or visual coding tools (not sure what they're called) and since I'm not well informed on the tools to make a game, there seems to be gaps in my thinking. I can't see what is actually possible to make out of the tools that we do have. I don't know if this is ideal either.

 

I wont do the programming end, so I'm trying to figure out what I can work on that's useful for making a game, and to figure out if I can even get started on making a game. I primarily want to develop a skill set from a design perspective and use that to contribute to bigger projects with others. 

 

I'd really like to know what you all think and look at some resources to get started, like websites, books, or online courses.

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alberth    9530

If you want a visual design tool for making a game, maybe making a point&click adventure is something you'd like?

eg http://www.adventuregamestudio.co.uk/

 

Making art is a big part, but so are inventing a story line or plot, and designing puzzles.

 

Edit: Also, you may want to browse the "creative side" forums here, to see if there is anything you like.

Edited by Alberth

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L.Liu    114

If you want a visual design tool for making a game, maybe making a point&click adventure is something you'd like?

eg http://www.adventuregamestudio.co.uk/

 

Making art is a big part, but so are inventing a story line or plot, and designing puzzles.

 

Edit: Also, you may want to browse the "creative side" forums here, to see if there is anything you like.

 

Thanks for the recommendation, I will keep it in mind. Getting started has been overwhelming for me and it really shows. 

 

I don't really know what to consider before getting started.

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NightCreature83    5006

You could also just get Unreal Engine 4 now that it is free, this comes with enough documentation on how to use it too. This will allow you to create blueprints which are a designer tool, created to make gameplay scripts or even other things.

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JayTheDaniels    248

Hiya :D

 

There's quite a number of resources I'd recommend. http://www.gamasutra.com/ is one of my favourites for learning about design from pros. If you're looking at making games on your own, might I suggest programs like RPG Maker (http://www.rpgmakerweb.com/) which is great for single developers to make surprisingly polished RPG games, or Game Maker (http://www.yoyogames.com/studio) for more "arcade-y" styled games. Additionally, Flash is very good, although it does require some programming to make games for. And of course, my shameless self-promotion bit, I have a blog about learning to develop games (I'm a new designer myself :D) which will be covering everything I learn in school, so maybe I'll be a good resource as well :)

 

Best of luck!

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Gian-Reto    7070

You could also just get Unreal Engine 4 now that it is free, this comes with enough documentation on how to use it too. This will allow you to create blueprints which are a designer tool, created to make gameplay scripts or even other things.

 

Just make sure you understand the following thing:

 

Even with a visual scripting tool like Blueprint, you are still programming.

Yes, you are not typing cryptic syntax into an unsexy editor window, you are dragging and dropping colored boxes into the visual scripting editor. And some of the nitty-gritty everyday details of game programming are hidden behind that colored box.

 

You still will need to understand basic programming concepts... what is a variable or constant? What is a loop? And so on.

 

 

It might be a good way to get introduced to the basics, just don't try your hand at Blueprint thinking it will just work with magic (you still need to know what you do), or that you can toss all technical knowledge out of the window (you can still drag and drop yourself into a corner by creating a Blueprint script that does stupid things affecting performance and introducing bugs).

 

 

 

Having said that, both Unreal Engine 4 and Unity 5 are free, if you want to get full fat 3D Engines and are not afraid of steep learning curves, and there is Gamemaker or similar 2D engines that might be available cheaply or for free.

Why not download an engine and try to learn to use its editor? If you get over that first steep bump in the learning curve, you will be starting designing levels in no time if you can locate free asset resources (both Unreal and Unity have tons of free models and textures in their asset stores)... level design IS a very valuable skill to have, and happens to be an entry level position in some studios for game designers. 

 

At some point you will need to learn SOME programming (either using the Blueprint system or trying your hand at C# or C++) if you want more than just still shots of the levels you have built ingame, or want to animate things in your level, but until then you can do a lot without programming. And as said, you should find more than enough free art assets to get you started online.

 

Maybe see what you can do alone, try to build some fun prototypes, network with your local or online developer community and see if you can find other fledgling developers that complement your skills and want to form a team as soon as you are ready (make sure you have plenty of expierience before you do though... without it, people tend to have really no idea of how much work game development is, what other disciplines can do and have to do, and so on... your team will most likely fall apart quickly).

Edited by Gian-Reto

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Tangletail    2915

Autodesk Stingray is also supposed to be fairly trivial to learn to use.

 

It features a node based coding schema that is built upon using Lua. So it's easy to add your own nodes if that is ever the case.

 

Cryengine also has a node editor as well.

 

Then there is Gamemaker, which back when I fooled with it in 2001 had a visual programming language.

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Alberth    9530

Thanks for the recommendation, I will keep it in mind. Getting started has been overwhelming for me and it really shows.

I don't really know what to consider before getting started.
Don't worry too much about it.

 

See it as an exploration adventure. Try random things that cross your path. Experiment, play, enjoy. If you hate something, stop doing it and find something else. If you like something, try finding more of it. At worst you trade time for experience. At best, you find the thing you fall instantly in love with.

The world is a big place, there is so much to see and try!

 

In time, you'll discover what you like and don't like, and find your path.

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