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EyalD

OpenGL, Still relevant?

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Hey guys ;)
It's been quite a long time since I posted here... Im around watching though :P

I've been thinking for a long time now about the relevancy of opengl or even code-game-programming in general.
With the amount of engines (and not bad ones honestly) out there, I'm having the feeling that actual coding is getting left behind and will matter mainly for engines programming.

I personally really like the "old fashioned" way, and not to happy about the situation...
XNA was my main choice for the past two years and I was thinking about switching to OpenGL to get a little bit more out of this.
So, thos thread is not only for you to discuss the situation I described, but also to give me an advice :))

Do you guys think that learning OpenGL now could still be the right way to go?
If so, what will you advice, doing so in cpp or java? (Im familiar with both and feeling comfortable either way).

Thank you very much and I hope this conversation was not brought up (at least not too many times) before.

;)

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if you're interested in graphics for games at some point you will have to learn D3D/GL there is no doubt about it. As an API OpenGL is still revalent (unfortunatley...) mostly because of the mobile market (if you are interested in that market). For desktops and consoles the picture is different.
 

If writing your own framework for developing games is the *right* thing to do, I really don't know.

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If you've been doing XNA for 2 years it should be pretty easy to learn OpenGL.

If you want to stay with C# just Google for C# OpenGL, and either way OpenGL is simple so even if you decide against it in the end it will probably be worth it to try it out for a week or two, shouldn't take you many days to get something going.

 

If you want to get a game finished efficiently on more than one platform then writing your own framework is not the right thing to do, so if you're not in it for the technical parts but want to release finished products go with an engine (but I still recommend spending those couple of weeks on OpenGL, good to know what it's about :)).

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I actually want to switch from C# just for the experience so thats not a problem...
Are there any good recent Indie games written from the ground up without a commercial engine? I would really like to check some out.

Thanks for the fast responses, never ceases to amaze me :)

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Shalom, 

 

OpenGL is relevant if you want to go "inside" the engines and simulators.

It depends on your goal, if you want to publish games I don't think starting to build another engine will suite you. 

If you really like the experience and want to learn, OpenGL is the way to go. (I've been very happy with practicing low level apis!).

 

Cpp or Java:  I personally like CPP for real time applications, it's really dynamic and suitable for low level apis where you need to manage your own memory.

with Java you have to address more frequently issues with the CPU and memory managment because it has its own memory managment system. 

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Shalom, 
 
OpenGL is relevant if you want to go "inside" the engines and simulators.
It depends on your goal, if you want to publish games I don't think starting to build another engine will suite you. 
If you really like the experience and want to learn, OpenGL is the way to go. (I've been very happy with practicing low level apis!).
 
Cpp or Java:  I personally like CPP for real time applications, it's really dynamic and suitable for low level apis where you need to manage your own memory.
with Java you have to address more frequently issues with the CPU and memory managment because it has its own memory managment system.

Shalom :)
As you said, gaining experience and diving inside is really something that I want to do, game-engines seems to "boring" for me, I mean, the coding part is something that I really miss with engines, scripting is just not enough :/

It is sad to hear that engines are to way to go now, but I think i might still go with old school gaming libraries haha...

And cpp does seems like the better choice.

Any suggestions for a starting project with opengl? 2D might be better suited I guess...

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For games using OpenGL you can check here for example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_OpenGL_programs

Especially under open source games there should be indie games.

Or just go to Steam and search for indie games for Linux, though you probably have to do some more searching for each title to know whether or not they use a pre-existing engine.

 

2D is a good place to start, like any type of sprite-based game with shader-effects.

Edited by Erik Rufelt

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Someone has to write/maintain Unity, Unreal 4, Game Make, etc.  Those things don't code themselves... yet.

Obviously, what I meant was if it is still relevant for me as an Indie game developer, or will it be the possession of AAA engine developers only?

Any way, I think I'm going to re-write one of my old 2D XNA games in cpp :)

 

Thanks

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I have also found that understanding the underlying technologies behind the tools I am using make me more effective in using them.

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