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Alundra

Antialiasing will stay in the future ?

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Hi,

soon lot of people will use a 4K screen, but the density of pixel is surely not enough to remove completely the antialiasing.

In the future, the density of pixel will be enough to remove the antialiasing ?

Is FXAA enough for new screen or HRAA will still needed ?

Thanks

Edited by Alundra

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There will come a time where pixel density will be high enough to eliminate the need for antialiasing. We're already there with Apple's Retina displays, but those are still tablet sized. Once large format monitors have pixels too small to be individually discernible to the human eye, antialiasing becomes a thing of the past. Still, not much will be gained performance wise. The increase in resolution means more pixels to fill.

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I disagree with MarkS. Even if you have pixels that are not individually discernible, aliasing can introduce visible artifacts, e.g. moiré patterns. A pixel should ideally be of the color that is the average color of the area it covers, and a single sample is a poor estimate of the average.


Very true! I forgot about that. I keep thinking about smoothing edges. Yes, antialiasing will be around for quite some time.

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I disagree with MarkS. Even if you have pixels that are not individually discernible, aliasing can introduce visible artifacts, e.g. moiré patterns. A pixel should ideally be of the color that is the average color of the area it covers, and a single sample is a poor estimate of the average.

I disagree with your disagreement. Aliasing occurs due to low Visual Acuity (jagged lines) or high visual acuity while still not reaching Vernier Acuity / Nyquist frequency (moiré patterns). The Visual & Vernier Acuity are affected by pixel density (resolution), display size, and distance from our eyes to the display.

Once the pixel density is high enough, the colour itself our eyes perceive will be a "blended average" done in analog form.
However, it is definitely certain that if we reach the processing power to achieve high enough resolution render natively at the Vernier Acuity, then it will far more useful, cost-effective and cheaper to lower the display resolution and use MSAA or SSAA instead.

It also shall be noted 4K is far from being enough to reach that state though (specially if vendors insist in selling >42' displays), so AA is still going to be needed. Edited by Matias Goldberg

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The great thing about high DPI displays is that anti-aliasing actually looks really good. Without it edges are still somewhat noticeable at 300 or 400 DPI, but where 100 DPI makes anti-aliasing look blurry just 4x anti-aliasing has a tendency to make edges especially in fonts almost perfect at a high DPI. Also doesn't interfere with the average color of a thin line as much, so you can make an anti-aliased black line still look black and not gray even though it's anti-aliased (as it's not just 1 pixel thick anymore, which would make pretty much zero pixels completely black).

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Don't confuse high DPI with large displays, either.  A 60" 4K screen is not high DPI.  Perhaps eventually the 1% will be able to get wall-sized 16K screens, but a lot of folks will still only have regular 100 DPI screens in their living rooms for the next generation -- cost is a factor for the non-extreme-enthusast crowd.

 

Perhaps in 20 or 30 years the cost of 1200 DPI livingroom-sized screens together with the bandwidth and availability for content to justify widespread demand will be reasonable.  It's the latter that's going to be the determinant.

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