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SonShadowCat

Why not always use mipmapping?

9 posts in this topic

i was wondering, since mipmapping seems sooo good why not use it all the time?? thx "Those who serve no purpose, have no purpose"
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each of the mipmapped levels takes up more texture memory, cuz you're literally making more texture maps. you can imagine if someone had a low memory video card, this may be undesirable. or maybe some people really like the moray effect.

a2k

Edited by - a2k on November 15, 2001 8:37:54 PM
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some things dont need to be mipmapped eg a HUD as it never changes distance from the camera
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i think the multimapping(extension method)perhpas is a good way.but i don''t really know if it has a good support to the low-end hardware.any one know?

jerry2
Programming,make a whole new world.
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Most of the low-end (==old) 3D cards have support for mipmaping.
But not trilinear - even if it''s available, it may be too slow.
I think, almost any texture (except menu, HUD and alike) should have mipmaps.
It takes some memory (~33% more), but it may increase fillrate quite a bit if you have a lot of the screen area covered with downsampled texture.
Mipmaps are very texture-cache friendly.
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mip mapping isn''t needed when you have anti aliasing, it lowers visual quality...

my friend has a voodoo 5 with AA, so for games like unreal tournament with super high quality textures, it looks very sweet forcing no mipmapping with AA, you don''t get jittering textures because of the ailising and you get a nice smooth look across them without quality loss

duckbob
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mipmapping though usually has a big differenc in speed.
eg a scene without mipmaps might run at 50fps but use mipmaps + youll get 100fps
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yah, but you could get that same diffrence in speed if you scaled your images down... you turn it off when your not going for raw framerate, 50 is good right? image quality can be improved without it, although it does have some great advantages, "blured" textures aren''t acceptable in every situation. It does however provide for better image quality in some situations, quake 2 for example uses pretty low res textures but mip maping provides for blended texels between pixels on the texture map...so you don''t have crip pixel edges on your textures...
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Also it depends on your projection setup

Perspective - use mip mapping
Orthographic - dont use it especially if your using 2d

Mark
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