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Where do you find your artist?

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I am a 3D modeler and some what of a animation artist, mostly I do CGI work and some freelance on the side.

I want to help out Indie developers more as I find that I enjoy that kind of work, how ever looking around I found that requests for 3D artist to work on games is low compared to other kind of 3D work.

 

a1.) So I was wondering HOW do indie developers look for artist to help them?

a2.) Has any one here ever recruited a artist and if you did how?

 

a3.) Do you prefer working with a single artist full time or do you switch, hiring a new artist for each job?

a4.) Would you prefer to buy your assets from a store, instead of work with a artist?

a5.) How much do you budget for art?

 

 

I know this is market research, however I believe it can help artist and other asset designers to work better with developers.

I have some freelance experience so if you have questions you can ask.

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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My office doubles as an outsourcing studio, where we connect freelancers with clients who need art. Most of our freelancers are people that we've previously worked with professionally (in full time jobs at previous game studios). Many of the rest are friends-of-friends / word of mouth, or people met through local networking events. A small number find us randomly on the web and ask for work.
On the other side of the coin, clients seem to find us through similar methods -- previous professional contact, word of mouth recommendation, direct meeting through local networking events, or finding us randomly on the web and asking for quotes smile.png
On the third side of the coin - me being the client (we outsource our own artwork through ourselves as the outsourcing manager laugh.png) - a single artist is better than switching, working with an artist is infinitely better than off-the-shelf assets (but obviously costs a lot more), and the budget is "what it takes" / "what we can afford"... You've got to shift your expectations to match what you can actually afford to spend.

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I've avoided recruiting an artist as long as possible due to money constraints, but when I do, I will recruit as few as possible for the following reasons:

1) artists cost money, less artists means less outlay
2) less artists means the artistic vision of the game is easier to communicate and different artists ideas won't be as likely to clash.

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You've got to shift your expectations to match what you can actually afford to spend.

b1.)Does this mean you will even hire inexperienced artist for simple 3D models, like a intern freelancer?

b2.)What quality do you expect from what prices?

b3.)Do you use a similar approach to hire all staff?

 

 

 


I've avoided recruiting an artist as long as possible due to money constraints, but when I do, I will recruit as few as possible for the following reasons:

I have notice that the few developers I worked with used free assets from stores, because of money constraints. 

b4.)This has lead to them creating code that works with the strange quirk of free assets, then needing to remake it for my own assets. I am wondering if there could be away around this?

 

 

b5.)Is the software a artist uses a large factor in recruiting?

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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You've got to shift your expectations to match what you can actually afford to spend.

2. What quality do you expect from what prices?
3. Do you use a similar approach to hire all staff?

 
2. There's an old saying, "you get what you pay for." In general, you can expect to get low quality for low pay. You want high quality, you can expect to pay.

3. He told you to shift your expectations based on #2 above. The concept of "expectations" is hugely important in this industry. It's vital that you learn to manage expectations of not only yourself but those who you hire and those you work for and those who play your game. Vital!

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This has lead to them creating code that works with the strange quirk of free assets, then needing to remake it for my own assets. I am wondering if there could be away around this?
 
Is the software a artist uses a large factor in recruiting?


Personally I use these free assets and also paid for assets (generic ones, not custom made ones) and I've encountered such quirks, like a model I've paid for who floats above the ground when he dies.

Usually I attempt to fix the model myself. I'm no artist but I can adjust the technicalities like which axis is "up", scaling issues and splitting out weapons and ancillary items into separate meshes. I'm also happy to adjust textures and generate normal maps etc myself. I guess others may not be.

The software an artist uses should not be an issue, you should specify a format you want deliverables in, and it should really be a standard format such as fbx, png, obj and not a proprietary format such as 3ds or maya. Usually you can't directly import these into a game anyway...

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3. He told you to shift your expectations based on #2 above. The concept of "expectations" is hugely important in this industry. It's vital that you learn to manage expectations of not only yourself but those who you hire and those you work for and those who play your game. Vital!
It appears a lot of management skill is needed when working with other people.
 
c.1)Maybe the reason most Indie developers don't look to hire is because there projects never grow that large, or they don't want to add the struggle of managing a large group?
 
c.2) Would places like Kickstarter and Patreon be a place to look for developers in need?
 

Usually I attempt to fix the model myself. I'm no artist but I can adjust the technicalities like which axis is "up", scaling issues and splitting out weapons and ancillary items into separate meshes. I'm also happy to adjust textures and generate normal maps etc myself. I guess others may not be.

I think this is the best possible solution, for developers to know the skills needed to make changes to assets.

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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Would places like Kickstarter and Patreon be a place to look for developers in need?


Kickstarter?? Why would you think that? How would that work? People who've posted Kickstarter projects have their work laid out for them already, so I can't imagine a lot of them would be open to a side gig.

Patreon? I had to go look at it. It looks like it might, but you'd have to sort through to find those who are capable of video game work.

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Kickstarter?? Why would you think that? How would that work? People who've posted Kickstarter projects have their work laid out for them already, so I can't imagine a lot of them would be open to a side gig.

Patreon? I had to go look at it. It looks like it might, but you'd have to sort through to find those who are capable of video game work.

I think there is a misunderstanding, what I meant was that a artist looking to join a indie game could look at the games on Kickstarter and Patreon.

I browsed a few of them today and have seen that a few of these game projects do leave contact details, this would allow a artist to contact them and ask for work.

 

Steam greenlight could also be a way to find indie work, however there is a lot of games that look like they will never see the light of day.

 

 

The thing is that most people who come up with a good idea, then rush to a app store or a site like Steam, could benefit the most from having experienced artists. The problem with it is that these are the kind of contacts that expect you to work for a cut of the profit or exposure.

 

 

edit:

Now that I had time to think about it there is much more ways for a artist to find a developer. Game developers have very limited ways of finding a artist for there project, portfolio sites seem to be the most common way when searching the internet.

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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