Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
ForkyTheEditor

How to start making the game?

This topic is 959 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hey guys!

So I together with a few friends want to make a game, but none of us has got any experience in game-making, and we don't know where and how to start. Since none of us has experience we need to make very small games at first and then finish a big project that we have in mind(It's a pretty big one, an open-world RPG, and we know it's not going to be easy). So we were wondering, what should we make our games in? Should we learn an engine like CryEngine or Unity? Should we learn a programming language like C++ (from what I understood we have to)? At some point we even wanted to make our own engine from scratch and we're still open to that idea. So can you guys help us? Tell us what we should learn. It has to be something that can create small games as well as big ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

If you're gonna work up to that project, may as well pick tools capable of it. Unity SHOULD be capable of this kind of stuff. Unreal definitely is. Unity is C#, which is much easier than C++. You're probably gonna lose a member or two. Programming is hard. Lots of people give up. Once you cross the great filter, it'll be easier to understand code (I haven't done this yet, and I've been at it for a year) and you'll be able to do cooler stuff. Unity will be overwhelming at first. There's a ton of stuff in it.

 

Just stick with one thing. I started with C# and Monogame, then moved to C++ and SDL, and have now come back to C# and Unity. I wish I had put all that time in Unity, but the C++ experience was great for learning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to start with smaller 2D games there are many simpler 2D game engines out there that might help you more than big, fat 3D engines that can be abused to also produce 2D games.

So you mean we don't have to choose one engine and stick to it? We can start with smaller ones and then go to more complex ones? I always imagined a 2D game engine is totally different from a 3D game engine.Thank you for your quick and informative reply!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The above suggestion are good, but I'd add a few of my own, more along the lines of expectations, and what to try.

 

You're first steps should follow Gian-Reto's advice. Find an engine, decide on a language. I would also recommend Unity with C# over Unreal. I've used both, unity is easier to get started in, which will help you skip over some beginner pitfalls.

 

The next logical step I imagine you would do is get together and think of an idea for a game. Have this really creative jam-session, jotting down ideas, bouncing ideas around, feeling really productive. Don't. None of you have experience, so you might as well be discussing how to engineer a hover-car. The only real thing you might want to decide upon is "2d or 3d?" "Platform, racing, or FPS". This is just because you can focus on what to learn.

 

The next step is will be to mess around with the engine you chose and start figuring it out. This probably won't be a very "do it together" type of activity. Once you've got the engine somewhat figured out, you can start trying to modify existing example games. Maybe meet once in a while in person or over Skype to chat and share some things.

 

If you've got people that are artistically inclined, it would still be helpful for them to be playing with the engine and maybe learn the basics of coding, but they should focus on getting models/textures/etc to function in the engine. They should not focus on making models for the future game. They should get models, art, animations, etc that they already have or freebees they downloaded to function in the engine.

 

Only after you've got some pseudo-games working, should you even start to try to think of a real game idea. Build the idea around your limitations and the engine's limitations. Even if your design encompasses only what you already know how to do, you will quickly find yourself in a situation where you don't know what you're doing. A game design is sometimes like chaos math.

 

My own endeavors with teams netted a lot of lofty-creativie ideas with maybe only about 10-20% of team members actually doing any work. Most aspiring designers only want to be idea people, but not get their hands dirty with any work - so beware of this pitfall with your team. Cull anyone who isn't willing to work. If they just want to be an "idea person" boot them. Everyone has a brain. Ideas are worth nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a beginner myself I would strongly recommend either Unity or Monogame and C# atleast for now anyways. C# and Unity or Monogame are very beginner friendly, and powerful.

I would also strongly suggest choosing one and sticking with it. Switching around while you are first learning is a bad idea. Just pick one and stick with it until you understand it enough to either make the things you want or realise that its not what you need. Since your end goal is making 3d games I would suggest Unity. The community behind Unity is very big and helpful. Lots of tutorials and quite a few books too. And its free (for the most part). If you don't want to use an engine and would rather do it yourself from scratch there is Monogame, SharpDX,SlimDX,CocosSharp,SFML.NET to name a few. All for C#. Hope this helps and Good luck! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the only thing i would add is that there's technically two ways to do it: ramp up (recommended) or dive in (only for 1%'ers).

 

the only reason why i mention this is because you seem to have your act together re: expectations and whatnot.

 

to dive in, you'd determine the engine to use for your "dream game", and focus on that. cull the chaff from the wheat when it comes to personnel, and be brutal about it. with a logical progression of learning and implementation, diving in would probably get you to the brass ring sooner. but it will require drive and tenacity. you may end up the only one working on the game. so scope becomes an issue. too big, and you never get it done in a _profitable_ amount of time.

 

your 1%'er quote for the day:      "achieve while others sleep"

 

a second one:

 

"i've already forgotten what you'll never even know" - from my roomies' quote of the day calendar back in college. i love that one - but its such a put-down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

whether you choose ramp-up or dive in, the process is the same:

 

1. determine game type, based on what you think you can accomplish, and potential profitability (if its a for-profit vs for-learning venture - i suspect this is a for-learning project).

2. determine the engine that will "getter dun" quickest. off the shelf - home rolled - whatever. whatever gets you to "gone gold" (as they say) quickest. 

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Gone+Gold

3. the engine will dictate the choices for programming language, graphics file formats, etc.

4. find compatible tools (2d paint, 3d modeling, wav editor, etc) that can "talk to" each other and your engine (IE: share common file formats - either directly or via conversion)

5. learn whats needed -    _as_needed_ !      don't waste you time learning skills / languages / engines / algos / systems / APIs / tools / libraries, etc until you know you have to. if its not in the direct path from you to the brass ring, then.....WTF?

6. stick with it. its a commitment, like a job, it will take time out of your life.  adjust accordingly, and get rid of those who don't.

Edited by Norman Barrows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My share:
- develop and more importantly FINISH a smaller game first, with the same team
- go through the full Development cycle
-- starting with a game design document and choosing the target platform, engine etc.
Here's an example of a small game project I did myself

http://crealysm.com/downloads/documents/booh-game-design-final.pdf

And ofcourse, Good luck. Good that you've managed to get a team and follow the dream

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!