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Jenison

Caping FPS...why do it

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someone tell me why you would want to cap the fps #. Say 30 fps...and not have it go buck wild say on games like Quake.

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you cap the framerate for consistency and predictability. people with higher framerates will get more updates per second, and in a game like quake, this would result in people with higher framerates being more accurate.

--michael

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Yeah, and for a simple physics system, consistency is the key. For example, lets say you are moving with a velocity of V. And you are undergoing a constant acceleration in the opposite direction. If your frame time is large, you''ll follow the V vector for a longer period of time before the acceleration will affect it. The shorter your frame time, the more times your V vector will undergo a transformation by the acceleration. Like the previous poster said, it''s more consistent and predictable.

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In a simple game, the FPS-variations will cause faster computations, which means everything might go freaking fast! But in most games, there are some kind of transformation so that the speed of all computations are fixed. But fixing the FPS rate and use it as a "global timer" in the game is a lot easier, and the visuality won''t be worse because of that.

This is a topic to be experimented around. Perhaps you need as high FPS rate as possible, dunno why...

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People notice fluctuations in frame rate more than they notice slower frame rates. It is better to run your game at 40fps solid that having it vary around 50-60fps.

Trying is the first step towards failure.

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one reason to cap the fps is human eyes and brains cannot handle more than 120 different images a second. having a framerate higher than this (as i''ve seen in some games) is just a waste of processor.

as mentioned before, another important reason to limit the fps is to free up resources for other things. i think anything over 50 fps is excessive, and really, what is the difference between 60 and 70 fps, or 95 and 115? could you really tell the difference? i think that if a person really can tell, and furthermore really cares about such differences your game is fundamentally flawed; the player is so bored they are worried not about exploring and experiencing the game, but about how many pictures are displayed per second.

i agree that too low a framerate can hinder a game, but that is not the topic here. i don''t see much of a problem with an upper bound, as long as it''s reasonable. just think, if you cut your framerate in half you might be able to push 25-50% more polygons per second, if you are efficient.

<(o)>

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Guest Anonymous Poster
According to "The Desktop Multimedia Bible"

"The average viewer perceives animation as more than a series of individual frames at around 15 frames per second."

Here are a few familiar fps reference points to consider:

Motion pictures operate at 24 fps.

NTSC television (North America/Japan) 30 fps b/w - 29.97 fps color

PAL television (Europe/Brazil) 25 fps

So if you''re churning out 50-60 fps you''re doing pretty good...

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