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goldblaze

Where to start to be come a designer

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So, I'm trying to learn the skill sets a designer needs, and I know I need to learn everything, but I'm trying to figure out where to start, on which subject and such. Is there any advise on the matter?

 

So far this subjects I believe I need to learn are: business, team management, basic programming, technical writing, art, both 3d and 2d, the unity engine(as that's most of what I'll be working with), and algebra/geometry.

 

Any help would be appreciated, as well as suggestions on other subjects that I really have to learn. smile.png

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Given that you picked unity, you'll want to learn C#, and make a few (very) small games, including art. Since business is also on your wishlist, you should try to also finish them and publish them. (No experience at all beyond progrmming, so I'll leave it at this generic advice.)

 

There is no substitute for experience, so just start, and find out what other skills you need as you go.

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It's more which subject to start with, as I can't learn all that at the same time.

Fair enough, let's see.

 

 

 

business, team management, basic programming, technical writing, art, both 3d and 2d, the unity engine(as that's most of what I'll be working with), and algebra/geometry

Do you have some kind of road map?

 

In other words, what can you postpone (since you seem to have too much now)?

 

In my limited view:

- "business" does not look interesting until you have a business, so after you got something that looks like it could become publishable?

- "team management" How many people do you expect to get in the near future. If it's a few or none, it sounds like it can be deferred for a while.

- "basic programming" (I am very biased here, take my advice with 2 grains of salt please.) sounds like a skill you need often. If you do programming yourself obviously, but even if you're more a designer, when it helps if you understand the world of the programmer.

- "technical writing" Not sure what it means, what do you expect to write in the near future? If it's requirements for a game design, my guess is that programming knowledge is at least useful here.

- "art" Definitely needed in the second part of the first game that you want to publish (and it has to be good then). Without programming no game though. If you want to do art for others, you don't have the programming requirement (although it's still useful for communication).

- "unity engine" I heard it has a nice scripting language for making a simple game. If that looks good to you (check out the tutorials), you may want to do "basic programming" in it, thus coupling unity with programming. Otherwise, you need to learn some (very) basic programming before using any engine.

- "algebra/geometry" Always useful. Edit: Maybe first make a few games that do not need this?

 

My ideas are just a random shot in the dark (and biased towards programming), but make a roadmap of your own (and do include lead time for learning, which I conveniently left out). If you don't know what you should do first, make both roadmaps, and compare.

I would suggest you don't do one thing at a time, but instead do them in parallel. Many of the subjects take years to master. If you do them together, you learn not only the skill itself, but also how to apply them in another skill.

Edited by Alberth

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which subject to start with, as I can't learn all that at the same time.


Start with the thing you most want to do. Your goal is to become a game designer, so design some board games and/or card games. That means you're going to need to do some art (to create the physical games) and some writing (to explain how to play, and to ask questions to gain feedback).

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Hmmm, technical writing, and team managment seem to be the biggest thing, as I need to make game designs that everyone can easily understand, but also want to learn art.

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Your goal is to become a game designer, so design some board games and/or card games. 

 

Yeah, board games or card games give some interesting game design challenges. You'll learn to prototype fast because games don't always play like you imagined them. Sometimes you'll be surprised by which parts are the most fun, and which parts just don't work, so it's best to get something playable as soon as possible before you start adding more stuff to it.

 

If you're more interested in programming a game, follow some tutorials that get you into the most basic stuff like getting things to show up on the screen and move. From there you can learn other programming techniques as you need them. I recommend making whatever simple games you can with the basic knowledge you have, not trying to make something huge before you're ready.

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You should know what you want to pull off and what you need to learn...

 

I'm also new to game development and there's a lot I hope to eventually learn, such as drawing, photoshop, C#, Unity, 3D graphics/modelling.

 

I decided I needed to program and started studying a C# for dummies book.

 

One day I decided to try out Gamemaker that I had purchased on steam, and realised I didn't need to become familiar with C# to produce a 2D game, putting art aside.

Currently I am fleshing out details of my game design and mechanics before I create my first text-based game in Gamemaker.

 

I think you should learn algebra and trigonometry first out of all the skills you listed.

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