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Abdou23

Draw art similar to the Ketchapp games.

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I'm a programmer, but I want to start drawing my own art, nothing ridiculously expansive or detailed like drawing axes or characters, but I would like to learn how to draw simple 2D geometric vector shapes like the ones you see in most mobile games made by Ketchapp (The Line Zen, Skyward, Ball Jump, Floors, Sky) I'm guessing it's not very difficult to draw that kind of art as it would be to draw the kind of art you find in some RPG games or platformer games, and also this art style is kind of a trend now, I guess the real problem with it will be how to figure out what type of colors would work with each other. If someone would point me towards a software(preferably runs on MacAir) and some tutorials I would very much appreciate it. 

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Are you saying that Inkscape didn't work for you?
http://www.gamedev.net/topic/664192-mobile-game-developer-need-game-art-free/#entry5201326

EDIT: If I time 8 minutes on Inkscape, with the Bezier pen tool, cusp node snapping and gradients:

arrow_Inkscape.png

 

Inkscape is not Mac OS native app, it requires other software in order to run on Mac, I tend to avoid these kind of software as there is good chance they will have technical issues, also what is important to me is a tutorial on how to draw this kind of art, regarding software I have no problem paying money for it as long as it's not on a rediculous monthly plan.

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Alright. Autodesk Graphic is a native Mac software and has plenty of tutorials:
http://graphic.com/tutorials/

To draw that kind of art you have to imitate it -- this comes from intent observation.
Download this resource and strip apart these icons to know how they were made:
http://graphic.com/tutorials/resources/flat-vector-icons

 

Yeah, I was torn between this one( originally named iDraw) and Sketch, And how would they compare with Adobe Illustrator, because from what I hear it's the most powerful app of the mall, but it's 30$ monthly subscription is a huge put-off. 

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I don't know how they would compare, but Graphic looks more beginner friendly. There are demo versions of all of those, including Illustrator, so next weekend you can give them all a try.
But before you even settle on a software...
 

To draw that kind of art you have to imitate it -- this comes from intent observation***.


I may not have expressed myself fully with this, so I'll elaborate.

You need to learn and practice two different skills:
1) Being able to imagine and visualise the graphic in your mind. What does it look like? What colours and shapes does it have?
2) Being able to use a software to realise the graphic. What tools offered by the software are you going to use? The polygon tool, Bezier curves, gradients etc?

To help understand what skill #1 is about, I am able to draw that shaded arrow above with just pencil and paper, no computer. That arrow doesn't exist in the software, it exists in my mind -- its volume, values, texture etc. I could also use gouache or an inking pen to do it. The tools that I use may change, but the idea of that shaded arrow is the same.

If right now you're not able to draw that same arrow with pencil and paper, then it doesn't matter what software you're going to get. You need to first work on skill #1, because if you're not ready and try to use skill #2 you won't be able to do anything useful and will just frustrate yourself.
In fact, you should be able to draw (or at least make a rough concept of) all of the graphics in your game with just pencil and paper, far away from the computer.
Skill #1 is the one you're going to use when trying to imitate other art styles, like the ones from those games you listed.

When you go to use skill #2 (using the digital medium to express something visual), you'll have to rely on skill #1.
A person that knows how to use the software well but can't imagine or visualise anything with their minds won't be able to do anything. Don't ignore skill #1.

Best of luck!

EDIT: edited for clarity.

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Remember to keep practising. Pencil and paper will be the easiest and fastest way to sketch out ideas.

arrow_Pencil.png

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