Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
JToiviainen

Potential testers needed for a Master's thesis experimentations

This topic is 1065 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I'm writing a master's thesis about the consistency-responsiveness trade-off problems related to multiplayer online games. Thesis has now proceeded into the user testing phase, where potential testers are needed. So I decided to try whether I could reach a good amount testers via this forum.

 

The test is implemented as a simple ping-pong game, where each player plays 4 rounds.  Each round ends when either the player receives 10 points or the time limit of one minute is reached. Each round uses a different consistency maintenance technique, which typically affect the game somehow. After each round, the user will be queried about how she/he noticed these possible game-play anomalies.

 

Testing will take approximately eight to ten minutes. Each player may participate the test with their own computers by using their web browsers to navigate into the URL http://cr-tradeoff.cs.hut.fi . No additional software installations should be required. Players may use a keyboard to control their avatar and to provide answers to the queries. It is therefore preferred to use an PC while participating.

 

Server will be approximately online due to next Wednesday (13.01.2016) and it should be reachable around the clock.There's no need to register for the test and all players may participate anonymously.

 

Hope that as many of you as possible would take a part of this test! Thanks!

 

BR,

JT

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
It's an interesting idea, but a couple of those modes were virtually impossible to play - on the 2nd one, the ball would only phase into existence for a couple of frames each time across the board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A bit more about the test implementation...

 

When a new game session is created, the server assigns a session delay from the 4 available delays (0ms, 25ms, 50ms, 125ms). This delay is used to hold incoming and outgoing messages for the specified time before they are processed. Same delay will affect the whole game session i.e. until all rounds has been played.

 

Techniques are selected in a random order from the four available techniques (pessimistic-presence, pessimistic-delay, optimistic-presence and optimistic-delay). Optimistic techniques are able to provide instant feedback to users while pessimistic techniques use either event serialization or event delaying before the feedback is provided.

 

As swiftcoder said, some of these techniques may become quite challenging to play with high latency values. For example, the implemented serialization will move the ball into new direction in a warping manner as the delta time from the previous update iteration may grow quite high. These warps may easily make a real-time simulation game to became a bit annoying if not impossible to play. However, I'll try to post some of the test results here as well when the testing part is over.

 

It would be great if we could get more people to participate as the current amount of results is still quite low.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One possible 'problem' I felt, is that the prediction of the paddle position of the other player was not relevant to my own gameplay at short timescales.

 

While I noticed some stutter at one point, I just didnt care because only the ball mattered.

 

To more specifically study the prediction of fundamentally unpredictable state (other player), the interaction 'latency' between me and the other player should be low enough for prediciton to be necessary and affect the experience. Then its a question of who to give consistency (server, me, other player) and whos to suffer from mistaken prediction.

 

Or I just suck at pong and didnt read the subtlest movements of the opponent to try and anticipate their moves tongue.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a good note from Waterlimon. The ball and the controlled (i.e. owned) paddle could be considered as the primary focus points within the scene as they are the only entities which can be directly interacted by the player. This may make player to easily ignore corrections that are applied to the remote paddle positions. It could be avoided by creating a game where the players may interact directly with each other, like with a small FPS or such. However, this is something that is also considered when the results of the testing phase are studied. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!