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HeroR

Low Poly vs. High Poly

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Hello,

 

I wanted to know how do you turn a low poly model into a high poly? I did several models for a project for my job and I put all the details that I wanted while keeping the poly count low and manageable. But my employer wonders if I can make the models a higher poly count. I know the correct process is to create a high poly model and then make a low poly version, but I have no experience making a high poly model. My experience is all about making my models as efficient as possible for gaming. Namely, getting the shape and details I want using the fewest possible polygons. The models are also checked and double check to make sure they have no ngons and tris.

 

I know just adding more edges is not the way to making a high poly model, so I am stuck. Any advise will be helpful.

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Import into ZBrush. Add details.

Do this. Low poly is somewhat like very basic models that are usually used to sculpt things in ZBrush. If you're model isn't too sharp, it should be fine.

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The other way around is mostly easier, by making different LODs.
You can also take a look at tesselation or geometry shaders (for example to split polys into more polys.

It depends on your needs, for more detail and netter looking models, Hodgman put you in the right direction (modelling).

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In some cases, you can get away with simply adding something like Blender's Subsurf modifier.  It adds smooth geometry and you can control just how much of it.  You can also then apply it and then modify it as you need to.  Note that this is similar to what would happen if you put it into ZBrush as suggested.  Also, Max and Maya have their versions(TurboSmooth in Max I think) so it should work wherever you go.

 

Just note that the results will also depend on how the original model is, and just how "low-poly" it is, including just where the the geometry is on the model, as these modifiers use a form of subdivision, so if the geo on the original isn't even, it won't be on the subdivided one either without some extra work.

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In some cases, you can get away with simply adding something like Blender's Subsurf modifier.  It adds smooth geometry and you can control just how much of it.  You can also then apply it and then modify it as you need to.  Note that this is similar to what would happen if you put it into ZBrush as suggested.  Also, Max and Maya have their versions(TurboSmooth in Max I think) so it should work wherever you go.
 
Just note that the results will also depend on how the original model is, and just how "low-poly" it is, including just where the the geometry is on the model, as these modifiers use a form of subdivision, so if the geo on the original isn't even, it won't be on the subdivided one either without some extra work.


I agree, you could use something similar to the Subsurface modifier, makes a model smoother and more "high-poly" without very much effort.

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In some cases, you can get away with simply adding something like Blender's Subsurf modifier.  It adds smooth geometry and you can control just how much of it.  You can also then apply it and then modify it as you need to.  Note that this is similar to what would happen if you put it into ZBrush as suggested.  Also, Max and Maya have their versions(TurboSmooth in Max I think) so it should work wherever you go.

 

Just note that the results will also depend on how the original model is, and just how "low-poly" it is, including just where the the geometry is on the model, as these modifiers use a form of subdivision, so if the geo on the original isn't even, it won't be on the subdivided one either without some extra work.

 

Thanks for this. Are you talking about the Smooth feature in Maya when you talking about something similar to Blender's Subsurf modifier?

 

I feel stupid for not considering Z-Brush since I do have the program, although my skills with it are still in the beginning stage. From what I remember, you add details to the model in Z-Brush and then baked them into the model if I remember correctly.

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The other way around is mostly easier, by making different LODs.
You can also take a look at tesselation or geometry shaders (for example to split polys into more polys.

It depends on your needs, for more detail and netter looking models, Hodgman put you in the right direction (modelling).

 

What is a LOD? I don't recall hearing this term before.

 

Btw, there seems to be a glitch on the site. It took me so long to reply because the thread tells me that no one has replied to my original question.

Edited by HeroR

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The other way around is mostly easier, by making different LODs.
You can also take a look at tesselation or geometry shaders (for example to split polys into more polys.

It depends on your needs, for more detail and netter looking models, Hodgman put you in the right direction (modelling).

 

What is a LOD? I don't recall hearing this term before.

Check here

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I'm not sure, but that "smooth" thing in Maya sounds about right.  If it is, then what I said probably applies to it.

 

LODs are level of detail.  Basically when a model(let's say a tree, since speedtree does exactly this too) is close up, you see it in high poly glory(let's say 10,000).  Then at some distance, you see a lower poly version of it(5,000), and further yet, the tree only has maybe 1,500 polys.  Finally, in the distance, it may get converted to a single billboard tree(works well for things that aren't really animated).

 

Generally if your game will do this, then you may create a super high poly version first in ZBrush.  Then create a "normal" version, which you use the ZBrush version to bake normals onto.  Then you can lower the polys either directly or using a tool in order to get the lower poly versions.

 

The issue we currently have is just that you are going the other direction, which is not as common from what I have seen.

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