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I am beginner and I don't know anything about game development so I want to learn and practice it on Unreal Engine 4 I know it is a difficult game engine because c++ language but I don't care I will learn it so I want to know what is the best full video tutorials step by step from beginner to professional for 3D and 2D games and in all game career (3D animation,game artist, programming,game designing...) and especially from a professional Japanese if there are, because I want to make a game with Manga art style like Naruto Storm series,J Stars and One Piece Pirate Warriors... , how long does it takes to practice game development ? and thank you for read my topic sorry for my bad language

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Start small like the others said. In my opinion a hardcover book works best, do all exercises.

After that, make small applications and learn step by step.

When you believe you're reading to use an API or engine like UE4, you know your next step.

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I have other question can I learn game developement without a degree in computer science ?

That's a tricky question to answer.

 

Some people can. Some people cannot.

 

You didn't fill out your location in your user profile, so I don't know if you're in a well-educated tech hub or a remote location with few schools.  The rules for the Bay Area, Seattle, Austin, and similar are different than the rules for locations where there are few tech companies and only one game studio exists.

 

All programmers are expected to learn on their own. There are many fields where continuous learning is a requirement. You shouldn't trust a doctor who hasn't kept current with medical journals and practices, you shouldn't trust a lawyer who hasn't kept current with new laws and precedents in their area, and you shouldn't trust a programmer who hasn't bothered to stay current on modern practices and techniques.  It is something you are expected to do on your own for your entire career.

 

But does that mean the college degree is required?  That depends on location.

 

One of several things that happen in a degree program is that you are required to study topics you may not find interesting or enjoyable. Left to their own devices there are topics that people would not study on their own, and that list varies from person to person.   Perhaps you would never study computer theory, or compiler theory, or databases, or networking, or certain algorithms, or certain data structures, or certain logic topics, or certain math topics, unless the school required you to. 

 

For programming as a career, in many regions of the world a degree is a critical filter to get past HR. There are still ways to get jobs in those parts of the world, but finding your job will be more difficult and you will likely get less pay or a lesser position than your degree-bearing peers.

 

 

If you live in a part of the world where programmers are well-educated, then yes, you should look for a degree.  If you live in an area where that isn't the case, that's up to your situation and location.

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Probably not for absolute beginners, but this is about as beginner friendly a tutorial series as you will find.  It covers creating a 2D game in Unreal Engine using Blueprints.

 

In some ways, UE4 via blueprints might actually be a decent way of learning to program.  But learning programming AND UE4 and Gamedev all at once, that's asking a lot of yourself.

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UE4 is an amazing engine. The fact that it is free makes it easy to start learning. The answers you are getting here though are very true. Developing a game takes a tremendous amount of skills. The days of a coder and a graphix guy hammer out an amazing RPG or 3D game are long behind us. That being said.. It truely depends on your goals. Now if you want to start learning game development my strong recommendation is to grab a mobility development API. Something like Unity, also free, and tons of tutorials with a massive community. In Unity make a simple project (Myself I took one of the tutorials and just kept adding to it as I learned new things) and use that to develop your scripting skills and novice C++ skills. 

 

It's great to see you not disheartened by the feedback. People are just being honest. Starting with a massive game engine like UE4 as a blossoming new game dev talent could lead you down a path of discouragement and disappointment. I have been doing game dev work since... well pre-2000. I have worked on pretty much every major engine out there and my work inside the indie game dev community has been so rewarding. I had the opportunity to work (unpaid just to be clear) with some triple A MMO devs as they were working through their games and it has been so rewarding.  That is 16 years of amateur game development in a nutshell for me :) I have not released any commercial games. I have a few projects on the go at any given time. I have a corporation (registered with financials and everything omg!) and haven't seen a penny from game development. That being said, the journey you go on is up to you to find the rewards in.

 

You are doing the right thing. Ask questions, read but most importantly, do something. I have offered this advice to hundreds of people and I leave it with you as my closing remark...

 

"The difference between indie game developers who make it work and those who don't is 99% effort". Don't wait for someone to hand you a free MMO that you can release :) Any game is going to take hard work, money, and a whole lot of learning and compromise.

 

Good luck my friend!

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UE4 is an amazing engine. The fact that it is free makes it easy to start learning. The answers you are getting here though are very true. Developing a game takes a tremendous amount of skills. The days of a coder and a graphix guy hammer out an amazing RPG or 3D game are long behind us. That being said.. It truely depends on your goals. Now if you want to start learning game development my strong recommendation is to grab a mobility development API. Something like Unity, also free, and tons of tutorials with a massive community. In Unity make a simple project (Myself I took one of the tutorials and just kept adding to it as I learned new things) and use that to develop your scripting skills and novice C++ skills. 
 
It's great to see you not disheartened by the feedback. People are just being honest. Starting with a massive game engine like UE4 as a blossoming new game dev talent could lead you down a path of discouragement and disappointment. I have been doing game dev work since... well pre-2000. I have worked on pretty much every major engine out there and my work inside the indie game dev community has been so rewarding. I had the opportunity to work (unpaid just to be clear) with some triple A MMO devs as they were working through their games and it has been so rewarding.  That is 16 years of amateur game development in a nutshell for me :) I have not released any commercial games. I have a few projects on the go at any given time. I have a corporation (registered with financials and everything omg!) and haven't seen a penny from game development. That being said, the journey you go on is up to you to find the rewards in.
 
You are doing the right thing. Ask questions, read but most importantly, do something. I have offered this advice to hundreds of people and I leave it with you as my closing remark...
 
"The difference between indie game developers who make it work and those who don't is 99% effort". Don't wait for someone to hand you a free MMO that you can release :) Any game is going to take hard work, money, and a whole lot of learning and compromise.
 
Good luck my friend!


I am really really like your comment thank you, i have question you are a project manager as i see under your comment and you make games ?

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I am really really like your comment thank you, i have question you are a project manager as i see under your comment and you make games ?

 

 

Haha well thank you for the vote of confidence in thinking I make games ;) I spend a tremendous amount of time developing and designing games but my paying job right now takes up 80% of my free time. I do go through the game development lifecycle fairly regularly I've got it fairly well documented now:

 

1) Great idea

2) High level design logic and architecture

3) Plan for monetization of end product

4) (And here is where it all goes South) Business case and RoI analysis on monetization vs level of effort and investment required to achieve release

5) Develop game

 

That being said I do recommend if you love game development always have something on the go. Work on someone else's project or simply set a goal for your self to grab a new tool and make it do things.

 

In my actual job I do multi-million dollar IT project work so managing deliverables and architecting game design solutions are actually becoming easier and I enjoy the hell out of it. I guess it's kind of like a sickness but like I said before if it's what you love then follow your dreams and keep working at it.

 

I had the privilege to speak to John De Margheriti a few years back about Aakrana when I was actively developing it. John has been the CEO of several major gaming companies and most recently known for his companies development and release of the Big World engine. (Before he sold the company.) John is a very inspirational speaker and we spoke on the phone for almost an hour at one point. One thing he said that really rang true for me. If you love doing something make the time for it. Learn about it. Develop your skills in an area that you can apply yourself to. The financial rewards will come but most importantly your happiness in what you are doing will pay off in it's own way. John is a great guy. If you ever get a chance to hear him speak at a conference do it. Amazing personality and talented leader.

 

Good luck Otaku.

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Thank you guys

I have other question can I learn game developement without a degree in computer science ? and give me other good game developement course if there are

and thank you ^^

 

Sure you can.

 

 

BUT.

 

As others have pointed out:

 

- It takes a long time to get good at any of the professions you listed... "game development" as such is no profession. There are some Indie developers creating small games that are able to do everything, but they have much more modest expectations.

Prepare to invest YEARS of your life into learning the art (of programming, 3D modelling, creating game Audio, 2D Concept art, whatever you pick to be your career).

 

- Then prepare some more YEARS to finally build your big project once you went through all this learning and creating smaller projects as part of this learning curve. Creating even a smaller AAA game (and the games you listed ARE AAA games made by professional studios) takes a small team years. With no one else but you yourself on the team, either you cut the size of the project to a more manageable size, or you will invest even more time.

 

- If you are trying to do everything yourself, you are shooting yourself in the foot. I talk from expierience, being a hobbyst equally interested in art as in programming. I have the advantage of being a professional programmer so I have much less of a learning curve on the technical side, still, concentrating on learning art creation left me with little expierience in game programming (which is quite different to what I do at my day job), while being only mediocre at creating art. I am in the same league as a lot of the deviantArt heros... my art might look good, but don't ask how long it took to create. Every Pro would have a hard time telling if he should laugh or cry smile.png

 

So in short: don't do it. Pick a career, concentrate on that, live with your shortcomings in the other parts (ugly proxy art if you go the programmer route, cheap copypasta code or no-code level design if you go the art route) until you get good enough to be able to work with a team of other enthusiasts (or maybe are able to enter the industry as a pro).

If you don't want to do that and insist on doing everything on your own, make sure you scope your projects accordingly. Simple graphics and simple code, that is what I mean.

 

- There is almost ZERO difference to the process of creating games no matter where the studio is located. Well, sure, every studio is different just as every other company is different. But besides cultural differences, I don't think you could find a special "Japanese Game Studio Culture". Just as the Manga Style spread worldwide, altough I am NOT trying to call these comics Manga... I know I would be burned at the stakes by some people ;)

Still, as interesting as it is to hear from how the japanese devs do their thing, you will find that the PROCESS of creating games is no different no matter where the dev is living or working... or even less where the dev is from.

You might be surprised to find out many people working at the japanese studios are not japanese at all....

 

- As to degrees: There is a general misconception that you go to University to LEARN A PROFESSION. That is not true at all. The first and foremost reason why you go to university is to get a degree. While a degree as a sign of your professional skill has lost a lot of street creds (especially in programming jobs), it is usually still mandatory to pass the HR filters at most companys.

Then there is the second reason, which is why most companys still want people with a degree. A degree shows that you learned the minimal basics to be able to LEARN a profession.

No University in the world will make you a professional game programmer, or a professional 3D Artists. But you will learn some basics to build upon. Without them, you are 3 years behind someone with the degree when you either a) train yourself to get good enough skills to apply to a senior role, or b) try to be hired by a potential employer for a junior role... with "junior role" being more or less a nice word for "you don't have the skills yet we need of a real professional, but we see your potential and are ready to invest some years of on the job training into you so we get the senior pro in 5 years that we have troubles finding on the job market right now".

 

So the question really is: do you want to learn game dev for your own sake (no degree needed, you just need dedication. But without that, the degree will not help you much anyway), or do you want to pursue a career as game developer in a big studio (degree needed, AND a lot of dedication and work in your free time)?

Edited by Gian-Reto

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Everything everyone here has already said is correct.

 

Allow me to add some of my own two pence/cents worth...

 

You don't need a degree to learn how to program, and to learn to make games as has been mentioned. I started learning to make games age 13, and i'm still learning now at 35. Everyone is always learning and honing their craft. I didn't really get much out of my time at university, and i didn't pick game development. I kind of fell into university as it just seemed like what i needed to do to get ahead in life.

 

When it came down to it, i didn't need the degree at all to get the jobs i wanted, i needed experience, and that can't be taught by any institution. Experience comes with many years of practice. For me it was starting out with text based games, text adventures, hangman, guess the number, and moving into graphical games (I remember very clearly making a bomber-man like game) and finally getting a PC and as my experience grew so did the complexity of my games.

 

In the end it's not the degree that makes the programmer (although it sure can help) it's how you apply yourself, and your determination and aptitude to learn new things.

 

Definitely decide what you want to do before you embark down a path. Is artwork your strong point right now, or are you a logical person with an analytical mind? Are you a bit of a musician in your free time? Each of these might guide you into the part of game creation you want to be a part of. Not everyone has to be a programmer, and if you have other (perhaps hidden) talents, there are indie teams crying out for volunteers to fill these roles right now.

 

Good luck, whatever you decide!

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I suggest you don't start with a series on making a game, but on the Intro to the UE4 Editor series first.
Being able to get around and use the tools in the interface will make learning anything else much easier.

Then maybe the time-track tutorial, or if you are eager to get started with C++ the 3rd person using C++ series.
By the time you finish all of the videos listed from the Tutorials section on the website you should be able to find/use most of the common tools in the engine and be ready for more advanced topics.

I agree in general with the comments others have made about picking one path and sticking to it.
But I also know that you aren't likely to have ready access to a Programmer if you're an artist, or an artist if you're a programmer, and will need to provide your own 'test' materials either way.

And of course, knowing some of the basics of each area lets you more easily communicate between departments.

Just be aware that if you go beyond very simple games, you will reach a point when advancing your skills in any one area will take most of your time.
 

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Thank you guys
I have other question can I learn game developement without a degree in computer science ? and give me other good game developement course if there are
and thank you ^^

 
Sure you can.
 
 
BUT.
 
As others have pointed out:
 
- It takes a long time to get good at any of the professions you listed... "game development" as such is no profession. There are some Indie developers creating small games that are able to do everything, but they have much more modest expectations.
Prepare to invest YEARS of your life into learning the art (of programming, 3D modelling, creating game Audio, 2D Concept art, whatever you pick to be your career).
 
- Then prepare some more YEARS to finally build your big project once you went through all this learning and creating smaller projects as part of this learning curve. Creating even a smaller AAA game (and the games you listed ARE AAA games made by professional studios) takes a small team years. With no one else but you yourself on the team, either you cut the size of the project to a more manageable size, or you will invest even more time.
 
- If you are trying to do everything yourself, you are shooting yourself in the foot. I talk from expierience, being a hobbyst equally interested in art as in programming. I have the advantage of being a professional programmer so I have much less of a learning curve on the technical side, still, concentrating on learning art creation left me with little expierience in game programming (which is quite different to what I do at my day job), while being only mediocre at creating art. I am in the same league as a lot of the deviantArt heros... my art might look good, but don't ask how long it took to create. Every Pro would have a hard time telling if he should laugh or cry :)
 
So in short: don't do it. Pick a career, concentrate on that, live with your shortcomings in the other parts (ugly proxy art if you go the programmer route, cheap copypasta code or no-code level design if you go the art route) until you get good enough to be able to work with a team of other enthusiasts (or maybe are able to enter the industry as a pro).
If you don't want to do that and insist on doing everything on your own, make sure you scope your projects accordingly. Simple graphics and simple code, that is what I mean.
 
- There is almost ZERO difference to the process of creating games no matter where the studio is located. Well, sure, every studio is different just as every other company is different. But besides cultural differences, I don't think you could find a special "Japanese Game Studio Culture". Just as the Manga Style spread worldwide, altough I am NOT trying to call these comics Manga... I know I would be burned at the stakes by some people ;)
Still, as interesting as it is to hear from how the japanese devs do their thing, you will find that the PROCESS of creating games is no different no matter where the dev is living or working... or even less where the dev is from.
You might be surprised to find out many people working at the japanese studios are not japanese at all....
 
- As to degrees: There is a general misconception that you go to University to LEARN A PROFESSION. That is not true at all. The first and foremost reason why you go to university is to get a degree. While a degree as a sign of your professional skill has lost a lot of street creds (especially in programming jobs), it is usually still mandatory to pass the HR filters at most companys.
Then there is the second reason, which is why most companys still want people with a degree. A degree shows that you learned the minimal basics to be able to LEARN a profession.
No University in the world will make you a professional game programmer, or a professional 3D Artists. But you will learn some basics to build upon. Without them, you are 3 years behind someone with the degree when you either a) train yourself to get good enough skills to apply to a senior role, or b) try to be hired by a potential employer for a junior role... with "junior role" being more or less a nice word for "you don't have the skills yet we need of a real professional, but we see your potential and are ready to invest some years of on the job training into you so we get the senior pro in 5 years that we have troubles finding on the job market right now".
 
So the question really is: do you want to learn game dev for your own sake (no degree needed, you just need dedication. But without that, the degree will not help you much anyway), or do you want to pursue a career as game developer in a big studio (degree needed, AND a lot of dedication and work in your free time)?

Thank you for your great answer ^ ^

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Everything everyone here has already said is correct.
 
Allow me to add some of my own two pence/cents worth...
 
You don't need a degree to learn how to program, and to learn to make games as has been mentioned. I started learning to make games age 13, and i'm still learning now at 35. Everyone is always learning and honing their craft. I didn't really get much out of my time at university, and i didn't pick game development. I kind of fell into university as it just seemed like what i needed to do to get ahead in life.
 
When it came down to it, i didn't need the degree at all to get the jobs i wanted, i needed experience, and that can't be taught by any institution. Experience comes with many years of practice. For me it was starting out with text based games, text adventures, hangman, guess the number, and moving into graphical games (I remember very clearly making a bomber-man like game) and finally getting a PC and as my experience grew so did the complexity of my games.
 
In the end it's not the degree that makes the programmer (although it sure can help) it's how you apply yourself, and your determination and aptitude to learn new things.
 
Definitely decide what you want to do before you embark down a path. Is artwork your strong point right now, or are you a logical person with an analytical mind? Are you a bit of a musician in your free time? Each of these might guide you into the part of game creation you want to be a part of. Not everyone has to be a programmer, and if you have other (perhaps hidden) talents, there are indie teams crying out for volunteers to fill these roles right now.
 
Good luck, whatever you decide!


Thank you my friend

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I suggest you don't start with a series on making a game, but on the Intro to the UE4 Editor series first.
Being able to get around and use the tools in the interface will make learning anything else much easier.
Then maybe the time-track tutorial, or if you are eager to get started with C++ the 3rd person using C++ series.
By the time you finish all of the videos listed from the Tutorials section on the website you should be able to find/use most of the common tools in the engine and be ready for more advanced topics.
I agree in general with the comments others have made about picking one path and sticking to it.
But I also know that you aren't likely to have ready access to a Programmer if you're an artist, or an artist if you're a programmer, and will need to provide your own 'test' materials either way.
And of course, knowing some of the basics of each area lets you more easily communicate between departments.
Just be aware that if you go beyond very simple games, you will reach a point when advancing your skills in any one area will take most of your time.


Thank you for your comment

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