• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

I want to learn all about game development on Unreal Engine 4 ?

This topic is 794 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I am beginner and I don't know anything about game development so I want to learn and practice it on Unreal Engine 4 I know it is a difficult game engine because c++ language but I don't care I will learn it so I want to know what is the best full video tutorials step by step from beginner to professional for 3D and 2D games and in all game career (3D animation,game artist, programming,game designing...) and especially from a professional Japanese if there are, because I want to make a game with Manga art style like Naruto Storm series,J Stars and One Piece Pirate Warriors... , how long does it takes to practice game development ? and thank you for read my topic sorry for my bad language

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Start small like the others said. In my opinion a hardcover book works best, do all exercises.

After that, make small applications and learn step by step.

When you believe you're reading to use an API or engine like UE4, you know your next step.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you guys

I have other question can I learn game developement without a degree in computer science ? and give me other good game developement course if there are

and thank you ^^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I have other question can I learn game developement without a degree in computer science ?

That's a tricky question to answer.

 

Some people can. Some people cannot.

 

You didn't fill out your location in your user profile, so I don't know if you're in a well-educated tech hub or a remote location with few schools.  The rules for the Bay Area, Seattle, Austin, and similar are different than the rules for locations where there are few tech companies and only one game studio exists.

 

All programmers are expected to learn on their own. There are many fields where continuous learning is a requirement. You shouldn't trust a doctor who hasn't kept current with medical journals and practices, you shouldn't trust a lawyer who hasn't kept current with new laws and precedents in their area, and you shouldn't trust a programmer who hasn't bothered to stay current on modern practices and techniques.  It is something you are expected to do on your own for your entire career.

 

But does that mean the college degree is required?  That depends on location.

 

One of several things that happen in a degree program is that you are required to study topics you may not find interesting or enjoyable. Left to their own devices there are topics that people would not study on their own, and that list varies from person to person.   Perhaps you would never study computer theory, or compiler theory, or databases, or networking, or certain algorithms, or certain data structures, or certain logic topics, or certain math topics, unless the school required you to. 

 

For programming as a career, in many regions of the world a degree is a critical filter to get past HR. There are still ways to get jobs in those parts of the world, but finding your job will be more difficult and you will likely get less pay or a lesser position than your degree-bearing peers.

 

 

If you live in a part of the world where programmers are well-educated, then yes, you should look for a degree.  If you live in an area where that isn't the case, that's up to your situation and location.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably not for absolute beginners, but this is about as beginner friendly a tutorial series as you will find.  It covers creating a 2D game in Unreal Engine using Blueprints.

 

In some ways, UE4 via blueprints might actually be a decent way of learning to program.  But learning programming AND UE4 and Gamedev all at once, that's asking a lot of yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UE4 is an amazing engine. The fact that it is free makes it easy to start learning. The answers you are getting here though are very true. Developing a game takes a tremendous amount of skills. The days of a coder and a graphix guy hammer out an amazing RPG or 3D game are long behind us. That being said.. It truely depends on your goals. Now if you want to start learning game development my strong recommendation is to grab a mobility development API. Something like Unity, also free, and tons of tutorials with a massive community. In Unity make a simple project (Myself I took one of the tutorials and just kept adding to it as I learned new things) and use that to develop your scripting skills and novice C++ skills. 

 

It's great to see you not disheartened by the feedback. People are just being honest. Starting with a massive game engine like UE4 as a blossoming new game dev talent could lead you down a path of discouragement and disappointment. I have been doing game dev work since... well pre-2000. I have worked on pretty much every major engine out there and my work inside the indie game dev community has been so rewarding. I had the opportunity to work (unpaid just to be clear) with some triple A MMO devs as they were working through their games and it has been so rewarding.  That is 16 years of amateur game development in a nutshell for me :) I have not released any commercial games. I have a few projects on the go at any given time. I have a corporation (registered with financials and everything omg!) and haven't seen a penny from game development. That being said, the journey you go on is up to you to find the rewards in.

 

You are doing the right thing. Ask questions, read but most importantly, do something. I have offered this advice to hundreds of people and I leave it with you as my closing remark...

 

"The difference between indie game developers who make it work and those who don't is 99% effort". Don't wait for someone to hand you a free MMO that you can release :) Any game is going to take hard work, money, and a whole lot of learning and compromise.

 

Good luck my friend!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UE4 is an amazing engine. The fact that it is free makes it easy to start learning. The answers you are getting here though are very true. Developing a game takes a tremendous amount of skills. The days of a coder and a graphix guy hammer out an amazing RPG or 3D game are long behind us. That being said.. It truely depends on your goals. Now if you want to start learning game development my strong recommendation is to grab a mobility development API. Something like Unity, also free, and tons of tutorials with a massive community. In Unity make a simple project (Myself I took one of the tutorials and just kept adding to it as I learned new things) and use that to develop your scripting skills and novice C++ skills. 
 
It's great to see you not disheartened by the feedback. People are just being honest. Starting with a massive game engine like UE4 as a blossoming new game dev talent could lead you down a path of discouragement and disappointment. I have been doing game dev work since... well pre-2000. I have worked on pretty much every major engine out there and my work inside the indie game dev community has been so rewarding. I had the opportunity to work (unpaid just to be clear) with some triple A MMO devs as they were working through their games and it has been so rewarding.  That is 16 years of amateur game development in a nutshell for me :) I have not released any commercial games. I have a few projects on the go at any given time. I have a corporation (registered with financials and everything omg!) and haven't seen a penny from game development. That being said, the journey you go on is up to you to find the rewards in.
 
You are doing the right thing. Ask questions, read but most importantly, do something. I have offered this advice to hundreds of people and I leave it with you as my closing remark...
 
"The difference between indie game developers who make it work and those who don't is 99% effort". Don't wait for someone to hand you a free MMO that you can release :) Any game is going to take hard work, money, and a whole lot of learning and compromise.
 
Good luck my friend!


I am really really like your comment thank you, i have question you are a project manager as i see under your comment and you make games ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement