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BenjaminTibbetts

Feedback wanted on 8/16-bit music

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Hello! I'm a musician with experience creating audio for games, but I haven't done much of that work for a while. I am hoping to get back into it. I'd like to experiment with imitation 8-bit and 16-bit music, keeping flexibility for incorporating newer-sounding samples. I could really use some feedback on my work from thoughtful listeners. Please know that I have a relatively deep background in music composition and I'm looking for advice on audio production quality, general usability, and specific game-related topics rather than music composition or theory (although I'm open to those criticisms as well).
 
Thank you in advance. happy.png
 
~Ben

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i listened to brass and castlevaniaish, both are quite good. I'm not a real music aficionado, but i do enjoy chiptunes. I can't really say much as far as technical praise or dissaproval, as i could about art - I just don't have the knowledge or vocabulary for it, but they sound good.

 

Both have an oldschool 'feel' to them, but they are more technically polished, which could be good or bad depending on if you want authentic sounding, or 'new' chiptunes. The little I know about origional old-school chip tunes - they were generally made by programmers who got forced into the task, read a little about musical theory, slapped together some scales, and called it music. Or so I've heard.

 

I think both of the songs I listened to are quite useable. Castlevaniaish is ambiguous enough that it could be used for a horror game or just a dark-area. It doesn't have that over-done "so scary" sound to it that pegs it into only being usable in monster-games or horror. It could easily be used when a player is exploring a non-threatening, but kind of dark-damp area. Like a ruin, cave, or dark forest. However, it's probably not intense enough to be used for combat music. You could either fade in a more upbeat intense layer, or use different music when the action becomes more intense.

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In brass this seems like a straight chiptune without any newer sounding samples. I good place to start would be the drum kit. Either record a real drum kit or use something like Slate Drums or Toontracks. The brass sounds will give it that 16bit vibe and the new drums will give it a modern twist.

 

Same thing with Castlevaniaish. Go with some more modern sounding strings for the drones like Vienna or EastWest. Also I would eq the highs down a little, they're very piercing at times.

 

?As for useability they're both pretty short loops, and in the case of Castlevaniaish it has a distinct start and end. Depending on the game these loops could repeat for a significant amount of time. If you're listening to a track that has a clear start and stop to it for an hour it's going to get very tedious. I would try and make the tails match the heads better.

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I think both of the songs I listened to are quite useable. Castlevaniaish is ambiguous enough that it could be used for a horror game or just a dark-area. It doesn't have that over-done "so scary" sound to it that pegs it into only being usable in monster-games or horror. It could easily be used when a player is exploring a non-threatening, but kind of dark-damp area. Like a ruin, cave, or dark forest. However, it's probably not intense enough to be used for combat music. You could either fade in a more upbeat intense layer, or use different music when the action becomes more intense.

 

Okay, thank you.

 

 

 


In brass this seems like a straight chiptune without any newer sounding samples. I good place to start would be the drum kit. Either record a real drum kit or use something like Slate Drums or Toontracks. The brass sounds will give it that 16bit vibe and the new drums will give it a modern twist.

 

I agree that this and castlevaniaish sound like traditional SNES music (edit: or, better put, simply old video game music), and I'm fine with that in these particular cases.

 

 

 

 


Also I would eq the highs down a little, they're very piercing at times.

 

Will do.

 

 

 


?As for useability they're both pretty short loops, and in the case of Castlevaniaish it has a distinct start and end. Depending on the game these loops could repeat for a significant amount of time. If you're listening to a track that has a clear start and stop to it for an hour it's going to get very tedious. I would try and make the tails match the heads better.

 

I agree; that loop is probably a little too obvious. For what it's worth, though, there are lots of obvious loops in even acclaimed video game soundtracks ranging from FFVII to Super Mario Bros.

 

Thank you both for your thoughts on castlevaniaish and brass. If you or others have the time, I would love feedback on the other three tracks I posted.

Edited by BenjaminTibbetts

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