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2d Traditional Animation workflow beginner help

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Hello, I want to create traditional raster animation.

I use Mangastudio (equivelant to Photoshop) to create frames.

 

I was thinking of testing the animation, how do I do that?

I was thinking of using animestudio to create animation.

 

Any tips or help how to create traditional animation for games, please help.

 

Note: When I say traditional animation I mean painting frame by frame.

 

 

 

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We know what you mean. You want to animate sprites. But you don't want to write the program that runs the animation? You could try inputting the sprite sheet into GameMaker, or you could make a .gif of each sprite, and animate it in Gif Animator.

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Ideally you draw and test the animation at the same time by flipping (going back and forth between frames to get a feel of how it changes).
A lot of people also use the "light table" or "onion skin" feature which allows you to see the ghost of the previous frames, so you can draw and know how much the frames differ.

You should take a look at Pro Motion:
http://www.cosmigo.com/promotion/index.php?Screenshots

I've never used this, but FireAlpaca is free and has basic onion skin and animation previewing:
http://obtusity.deviantart.com/art/Quick-introduction-to-animation-in-FireAlpaca-1-5-569187396 (This is not the official website, it's just a tutorial.)

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By traditional, do you mean you're hand-painting/drawing the frames, scanning them into the computer?

 

Hats off to you if you can make anything worthwhile like that. That's an enormous amount of work.

 

Tom's suggestion to do a .gif is probably the most straight-forward choice. Alternatively, you can import frames with some film-editing software (like Final Cut, etc) and set the time-delay between frames to something low ( like .1s ). If your only intention for the moment is previewing the animation, the .gif-maker route would probably be the fastest unless if  you have a professional-level film editing suite.

 

If you resolution is low enough, I highly recommend Aesprite. It's geared towards pixel art though.

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By traditional, do you mean you're hand-painting/drawing the frames, scanning them into the computer?
 
Hats off to you if you can make anything worthwhile like that. That's an enormous amount of work.
 


Hi, hell no, I use mangastudio to draw the frames, what I meant by traditional is frame based animation with raster graphics rather than vector.

Thanks for the suggestions, what are your personal workflows guys? Do you draw in photoshop and create GIFS there? The reason I don't use Photoshop is it causes jitters on my lines when I draw on my tablet.
What software are you guys using? I am not using pixel art.

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Wait, if you own Photoshop (and your version has that Timeline feature) and your only obstacle is the natural jitter from your arm, you can buy LazyNezumi. It's a program that serves as a stabiliser for your brush strokes:
http://lazynezumi.com

The total cost would be less than buying some full animation software.

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