• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Learning level design

This topic is 783 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I've made a post 1 month ago for say that i have 4 months of "holidays", that would like to use them for learn level design and so i ask for tutorials and what kind of stuff i should read ( http://www.gamedev.net/topic/675208-level-designer-course-4-month-before-the-registration/ ). After this post, i read a bunch of article who explain how to imagine a level ( http://gamecareerguide.com/features/1476/level_design_from_paper_to_.php , http://gamedevelopment.tutsplus.com/tutorials/a-beginners-guide-to-designing-video-game-levels--cms-25662 , http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/creative/game-design/life-of-a-level-designer-r3121 and some more ...), and i begun to learn how to use the Unreal Engine ( Unreal have an huge documentation compare to unity so I prefered to learn this one). I also begun to learn how to use 3ds max but i know only the basics, tutorials are kind of hard to find. 
 
After this readings and those tutorials, i'm capable of making a little level in unity, with a character playable with a mouse+keyboard or joystick, I can make him jump and punch, I've made a little AI  who follow the player if he is in view, I've put some particle effect and i'm only capable of making a table and a glass of wine in 3ds max. But i don't feel like i'm capable of completing a level with a gameplay, a design and some script who are interesting enough to being selected to the course that i want to do. So i would like to know a way to work that will be more efficient than doing some tutorials or if you know a tutorial who cover the design of an entire level ( modeling, programmation, etc ...).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

 

I've made a post 1 month ago for say that i have 4 months of "holidays", that would like to use them for learn level design and so i ask for tutorials and what kind of stuff i should read ( http://www.gamedev.net/topic/675208-level-designer-course-4-month-before-the-registration/ ). After this post, i read a bunch of article who explain how to imagine a level ( http://gamecareerguide.com/features/1476/level_design_from_paper_to_.php , http://gamedevelopment.tutsplus.com/tutorials/a-beginners-guide-to-designing-video-game-levels--cms-25662 , http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/creative/game-design/life-of-a-level-designer-r3121 and some more ...), and i begun to learn how to use the Unreal Engine ( Unreal have an huge documentation compare to unity so I prefered to learn this one). I also begun to learn how to use 3ds max but i know only the basics, tutorials are kind of hard to find. 
 
After this readings and those tutorials, i'm capable of making a little level in unity, with a character playable with a mouse+keyboard or joystick, I can make him jump and punch, I've made a little AI  who follow the player if he is in view, I've put some particle effect and i'm only capable of making a table and a glass of wine in 3ds max. But i don't feel like i'm capable of completing a level with a gameplay, a design and some script who are interesting enough to being selected to the course that i want to do. So i would like to know a way to work that will be more efficient than doing some tutorials or if you know a tutorial who cover the design of an entire level ( modeling, programmation, etc ...).

 

 

1. Is it Unity or Unreal you are using? You are contradicting yourself up there... if you really think Unreal Documentation is vaster than Unitys, you didn't properly look for the Unity one. IMO, Unity has more documentation, and most importantly, a better indexed one. That is not to say the Unreal Engine documentation is particularly bad... at least as long as you stay on the Blueprint side of things.

 

I think Unity is easier to use for a beginner. There are others saying the exact opposite, and as you already started with your engine of choice, stick with it for now. Just make sure you tell people which one it is you are using smile.png

 

2. Learn to crawl before you try to run. Seems like your learning is getting along pretty nicely. a) you are able to set up a basic level (check), b) you are able to set up the player character and make him move and respond to player input (huge "check", that is actually a bonus for a level designer as I don't think the level designer is meant to setup player characters... maybe enemies), c) you are able to set up enemy mobs and NPC and add basic AI to them (again, check and "bonus check"), d) you can create and place particle effects (check), e) you have some basic understanding of 3D modelling (check).

 

Don't think you are on a bad path. Always remember that nobody starts out by creating a masterpiece... recognize your achievements and be proud of it. Now make sure you focus on things that are important for your chosen education, and improve there.

 

Start over and create another level... and another one... and then again, another one. With each new try, try to apply what you learned from past mistakes and your reading into the topic.

 

While some skills are good to have and fun to train (3D modelling for example), don't wast too much time trying to become a top 3D artist. That isn't your job as a level designer. You will be expected to be good enough to produce your own placeholder art and be able to place and optimize the art in the engine editor, but someone else is responsible to produce polished art.

 

You could use free art from the internet to get better art into your levels, if you are unsure if your art is good enough for showing off your levels.

 

Also, don't go too overboard on writing the most clever code. Learning to code and improving your skills can never hurt you as a level designer, if you can create level scripts without having to ask the programmers, that is a big plus for you as an employee.

But again, you will not be coding the main game logic, AI, or any other part of the code apart from the most basic scripts that make your level tick.

 

 

A level designer is designing and implementing the levels of a game. He is NOT creating the game art, and he is NOT programming the game. Art and Coding skills are nice to have. Being able to design good levels, and efficiently implement them in an engine editor are mandatory skills for a level designer.

Edited by Gian-Reto

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being able to design good levels, and efficiently implement them in an engine editor are mandatory skills for a level designer.

 

My problem is that if i don't program a gameplay feature, i have nothing to highlight in my level ... it's kind of pointless to do a level with nothing to show. That's why i think that my way to work is kind of bad, i'm doing really little things and it could take me years to do an interesting level by working that way.

 

Btw, do you know a good website for free assets and textures ?

Edited by LittleButter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

My problem is that if i don't program a gameplay feature, i have nothing to highlight in my level ... it's kind of pointless to do a level with nothing to show. That's why i think that my way to work is kind of bad, i'm doing really little things and it could take me years to do an interesting level by working that way.

 

 

Well, you could code some very simple game logic, or even use third party code for that. Sounds to me like you already HAVE the starting point. Add some jumping, the ability to destroy enemies by jumping on them, and voila, you have a simple jump and run.

 

That should be enough as a framework for your level design.

 

Remember, what you want to do is show your skill in designing levels that fit the theme and logic of the game well, that are interesting to the player, and teaches him how to use the game controls through gameplay.

You are less interested in showing that you can come up with the most innovative game design, or the most clever code. Both of this is only there to allow you to show your level design skills.

 

 

Games do not have to be very complex for a good level designer to design an interesting level.

Oh, and never forget that levels do not need to be extralong if you are doing them for demonstration purposes.

 

 

Apart from that, there is also the possibility to just design the levels, and enough code for a basic walkthrough, or maybe just a cam on rails. That might not show your level design skills just as much as in "designing a level to fit the gameplay"... but it allows you to concentrate on the glitz, showing your skills in "designing a level to fit a theme".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My problem is that if i don't program a gameplay feature, i have nothing to highlight in my level ... it's kind of pointless to do a level with nothing to show.


So you're saying that you want to make a level as a portfolio piece? The "point" of doing this is so you can make something that will get you a job? It seems that's what you imply by "highlighting my level" and "nothing to show." You don't seem to be as focused on the gameplay as "showing off" somehow. The purpose of level design isn't to wow with prowess - it's to enable fun for the player. And enabling fun doesn't require technical prowess. What's your priority here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement