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WilmingtonHD

Very Very First Steps

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Hey guys my name is William Haynie and I am looking to enter the game development industry after I graduate from High School. I am 100 percent new at programming, design, art, basically everything you can thing of I am a beginner at. What I do have however are ideas, I just don't have the skills or experience to turn those ideas into a product. I am asking for some help, if anyone has helpful advice please let me hear it! Also I wanted to know if anyone knows of any YouTube videos/ channels that I could visit that would help me.

 

Thanks for your time, I really appreciate it! :)

 

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If you want to be successful at game creation in the long-term, you must have a solid coding skill base. At first, art, FX, and other "frills" are simply distractions which you might later realize that you cannot actually implement with your current skills and/or hardware. Do not spend effort developing art before developing game mechanics. If you are dedicated enough to spend time learning how to code, I would recommend starting with Python or a similar very high-level language and working up from printing "Hello, World" to a reasonably complex program. This will allow you to learn how to transform your general ideas into concrete algorithms. Only then should you start looking at engines and other, more efficient languages (I prefer C++) and art design. This will take time. Lots of time. But it is worth it if you pull through.

 

There are plenty of tutorials out there for every common language. Google is your friend.

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If you want to be successful at game creation in the long-term, you must have a solid coding skill base. At first, art, FX, and other "frills" are simply distractions which you might later realize that you cannot actually implement with your current skills and/or hardware

Euhm, I have the opposite problem. I can code very well, but I cannot make art to make my code attractive to users. Now what?

 

@WilimingtonHD: try everything for some time. Generally, you'll find that one of arts: graphics, sound, or programming will attract you more, and you will then do less with the other art forms. On the other hand, if you continue working in the game development industry, you'll run into people doing the other art forms too, and it's really useful if you can at least somewhat understand how they work and what kind of information they need.

 

For starting programming, Python is a very good suggestion.

Edited by Alberth

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You want to enter the industry, not be a hobbyist or indie dev? Go to college for something related to making games. It's very hard to even get an interview to get into the industry without either a degree or considerable and verifiable prior experience (the latter of which is hard to get without being in the industry)

Start by taking any electives your high school offers that has anything remotely to do with programming, graphic design, or computer graphics. Figure out where your aptitude lies by gauging how easy you found these classes, and your overall performance in them. Very few programmers are good at making game art (see Alberth above, and myself for that matter). Very few game artists have much programming ability. It makes getting terribly far in indie/hobby dev more difficult, but game development companies don't expect you to be able to do it all, so it's just fine to only be good at one aspect of game development. Use this information to curb your expectations and figure out what degree you should aim for in college.

And don't forget to practice outside of school, maybe even collaborate with indie and hobbyist developers. CS and art-related majors are a dime a dozen. It will help to have a portfolio.

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considerable and verifiable prior experience (the latter of which is hard to get without being in the industry)

 

I agree with everything you said except this, above.

 

It's easy to get lots of verifable prior experience. Learn to make games in your own time, and just make games and release them. You must finish them and distribute them online. This serves as your verifiable record of prior experience of making games. You don't need a games studio to hire you to prove you can make games, get out there and start making games :)

 

If you're doing this to get hired, studios won't be looking for some AAA next call-of-warcraft or similar from you, just anything that you've released to prove you know the concepts and are current with technology and can see a project through to the end.

 

Good luck!

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You want to enter the industry, not be a hobbyist or indie dev? Go to college for something related to making games. It's very hard to even get an interview to get into the industry without either a degree or considerable and verifiable prior experience (the latter of which is hard to get without being in the industry)

Start by taking any electives your high school offers that has anything remotely to do with programming, graphic design, or computer graphics. Figure out where your aptitude lies by gauging how easy you found these classes, and your overall performance in them. Very few programmers are good at making game art (see Alberth above, and myself for that matter). Very few game artists have much programming ability. It makes getting terribly far in indie/hobby dev more difficult, but game development companies don't expect you to be able to do it all, so it's just fine to only be good at one aspect of game development. Use this information to curb your expectations and figure out what degree you should aim for in college.

And don't forget to practice outside of school, maybe even collaborate with indie and hobbyist developers. CS and art-related majors are a dime a dozen. It will help to have a portfolio.

Actually as it turns out I am currently responding to you from my programming class xD. Thanks for the advice, I really appreciate it! 

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You must finish them and distribute them online.

Depending on the person, getting them to the point you're comfortable with releasing them with your name actually on them can be challenging. It takes a lot of time to find reliable collaborators to cover what you're not good at. Some people might find it easier than I have.

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