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Has anyone ever ported a ps2 game to pc?

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Someone just asked me regarding a certain port from ps2 to pc. Has anyone ever done a port from ps2 to pc? How difficult was it? 

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^^ What he said.

 

Back when I worked on PS2 games, we always had a version of the game that ran on PC as well. If a PS2 dev-kit costs the same as three month's salary, then you don't want to have to put one of them on everyone's desks. We generally shared one PS2 dev-kit between two or three people, and most of the time worked directly with the PC version of the game. This was true for games where we never even shipped a PC version.

In those situations, it could be as simple as building the code-base for PC :lol: (well, and the hassle of trying to get a code-base from over a decade ago to build on modern PC's... and implementing all the PS2-specific features that nobody bothered to fix for that developer-only PC version...)

 

BTW, is this a duplicate account of Logitech12?

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Also, if you don't have source code, then give up right now. I was once part of a PS2->PS3 porting project where the original developer lost the source code, and we had to abandon the project; trying to resurrect a game via decompiling MIPS disassembly is the worst thing ever when you have a tight budget and schedule.

If you're in this situation, use an emulator and call it quits. Edited by Nypyren

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And finally, don't assume the source code works.

 

I have had to port many games from one platform to another and often you get supplied what the developer "thinks" is the final source code.

 

Often it isn't and you have bugs to fix to get it to compile. (then bugs to fix that they shipped with...... sigh)

 

My process was very simple. I installed all the files and then created a brand new project for the new target platform.

 

Add the source code files a bit at a time. The shear volume of errors otherwise makes it impossible to deal with.

 

When you have a call into the underlying OS, add it to a header file and include the header in the source.

 

Just keep going until the whole project compiles, but doesn't link as all the OS specific functions are missing. You do now have a list of all the functions you need to create though.

 

Then write code for the missing functions and bingo you have something that links and runs, and probably crashes, but you have a starting point.

 

Making it a good game after that is a different kettle of kippers.

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Also, if you don't have source code, then give up right now. I was once part of a PS2->PS3 porting project where the original developer lost the source code, and we had to abandon the project; trying to resurrect a game via decompiling MIPS disassembly is the worst thing ever when you have a tight budget and schedule.

If you're in this situation, use an emulator and call it quits.

was in a similar situation. It's really shocking how many devs just loose source code, sometimes just some "ex employee might have a copy on a floppy, you can mail him maybe".

 

I've ported a PSP binary to a C# platform, emulators not really available and performance wise might not deliver. My solution was to convert the assembler dump to c# code (it's quite scary if you notice how many "doubles" were used which the HW back then could not handle and it ran in emulation function.

my optimization pass was to find code blocks (branch target to return with time stamps added by the conversion tool) that were small and expensive and rewrite these with native c# code.

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