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What are game developers looking for lately

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Im talking mainly indie developers, I like to compose orchestral music and even though it is widely used in AAA games with them becoming more and more cinematic, I'm just wondering what music indie developers are looking to put in there games, for example a more electronic retro sound or something else, how long are the tracks usually that you implement into your engine, is music in indie games carefully deliberated over or used more to enhance the overall atmosphere rather than drive the story. I know of course it depends on the game but I'm talking in general

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I don't think I see any 1 style used more than others. As for the length I would say between 3 to 4 minute loops with maybe 2-3 modular changes. The modular part is usually the most important. Most games aren't linear and the music has to be able to change to quickly accommodate what's happening on screen. If you have a linear emotional arc it's not going to match up. So I would say modular music is what I find people looking for the most.

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The tracks in my game are very much tied in legth to the length of the level.

 

In my current game, levels have time limits of between 1 and 2 minutes, so a track longer than this would be pointless as you'd never hear the end.

 

Depending on the game this influences the genre, for my current game, i'm hoping to source some tracks with a more industrial feel, but one of my other games i was more after epic sounding orchestral tracks and general ambience.

 

Hope this helps!

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I don't think I see any 1 style used more than others. As for the length I would say between 3 to 4 minute loops with maybe 2-3 modular changes. The modular part is usually the most important. Most games aren't linear and the music has to be able to change to quickly accommodate what's happening on screen. If you have a linear emotional arc it's not going to match up. So I would say modular music is what I find people looking for the most.

With modular changes do you mean interactive music? Like layers that can be added and taken away depending on the situation and action in game.

 

-Lassi

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I don't think I see any 1 style used more than others. As for the length I would say between 3 to 4 minute loops with maybe 2-3 modular changes. The modular part is usually the most important. Most games aren't linear and the music has to be able to change to quickly accommodate what's happening on screen. If you have a linear emotional arc it's not going to match up. So I would say modular music is what I find people looking for the most.

With modular changes do you mean interactive music? Like layers that can be added and taken away depending on the situation and action in game.

 

-Lassi

 

Interesting point. How prevalent is situational layering used in video game music? That sounds like that would require a lot of extra coordination between the composer and the animation team. 

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I don't think I see any 1 style used more than others. As for the length I would say between 3 to 4 minute loops with maybe 2-3 modular changes. The modular part is usually the most important. Most games aren't linear and the music has to be able to change to quickly accommodate what's happening on screen. If you have a linear emotional arc it's not going to match up. So I would say modular music is what I find people looking for the most.

With modular changes do you mean interactive music? Like layers that can be added and taken away depending on the situation and action in game.

 

-Lassi

 

My guess is that CCH Audio is referring to a simpler approach often used, which is to have something like a non-combat and an in-combat pair of music loops, in the same tempo and key, that can be switched between quickly. That a lot less work than an interactive music system that adds overdubs of various instruments etc to a central 'stem' of music.

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