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"Display driver stopped responding and has recovered" error and Unity freeze

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Hello everyone,

I am having a great time learning game development with Unity, but I am facing a very annoying problem.

Unity freezes, and I receive this error "Display driver stopped responding and has recovered", it happens randomly, but it happens more often when I click play on an animation or when I press the play button to check the game or when I add or move objects in the scene, but it does not happen every time I do so.

I checked everywhere, but cannot find a solution.

Lenovo Y5070 laptop. (Brand new, no antivirus, turned off firewall)
Windows 10.
16 GB RAM.
Nvidia Geforce GTX960M (Latest update 364.5.1)
x64
Unity 5.3.2f1

Thank you for your help :)

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This is an issue for Unity's discussion boards. Gamedev.net is not Unity technical support.

 

Check the output from your unity logs, look for the exact error message, and search on Unity's boards for the error message.  If that doesn't help, post the relevant section of the error log on Unity's forums following their rules for error reporting.

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This is an issue for Unity's discussion boards. Gamedev.net is not Unity technical support.

 

Check the output from your unity logs, look for the exact error message, and search on Unity's boards for the error message.  If that doesn't help, post the relevant section of the error log on Unity's forums following their rules for error reporting.

Although I concur, I just wanted to say a TDR (that's how we call these type of errors) should not happen. It means something went catastrophically bad in the driver (NVIDIA's problem), a bad shader (Unity's problem), or could be hardware failure.

 

I suggest you check your GPU isn't overheating (check the temps with GPU-Z and if they correlate with the TDRs). Games often don't overheat a GPU as much as an empty scene running at 2000 fps can do.

 

Normally I would also suggest to check if your PSU can handle the power, but it's a notebook. Try looking for vendor tools to check for battery health. PC Wizard actually got my battery's health for my old notebook.

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Although I concur, I just wanted to say a TDR (that's how we call these type of errors) should not happen. It means something went catastrophically bad in the driver (NVIDIA's problem), a bad shader (Unity's problem), or could be hardware failure.

I can trigger one very easily in my game by trying to bake all my probes in a single frame, which can push the frame-time out to several seconds. Windows/NVidia seem to decide that if your draw-call is taking that long, it must be invalid. On my desktop with a beefy GPU I can actually get away with this, but my laptop TDR's reliably.
 
It actually makes me worry for a lot of my load-time baking stuff -- if I'm going to test out some min-spec laptop in the future and find my game is TDR'ing it :lol:
On console you have a similar problem, but there you simply fail to pass certification for having a several-second frame-time! :D

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I can trigger one very easily in my game by trying to bake all my probes in a single frame, which can push the frame-time out to several seconds. Windows/NVidia seem to decide that if your draw-call is taking that long, it must be invalid. On my desktop with a beefy GPU I can actually get away with this, but my laptop TDR's reliably.

 

I believe this watchdog feature is actually provided by the WDDM driver rather than the 3D driver; there is apparently no such limitation for graphics units not connected to a monitor :)

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This is an issue for Unity's discussion boards. Gamedev.net is not Unity technical support.

 

I know that this is a technical problem that belongs to Unity forums, but I do not understand why I cannot ask a technical question related directly to game development in a forum dedicated to game development.

 


I suggest you check your GPU isn't overheating (check the temps with GPU-Z and if they correlate with the TDRs). Games often don't overheat a GPU as much as an empty scene running at 2000 fps can do.
 
Normally I would also suggest to check if your PSU can handle the power, but it's a notebook. Try looking for vendor tools to check for battery health. PC Wizard actually got my battery's health for my old notebook.

 

I will try what you suggested, but I would be really amazed if it is something to do with the PSU handling the power or if it is overheating, because this laptop can really deal with a lot of heavy stuff, and the scene I am practicing on only has a few cubes and spheres and no textures almost.

 

Some other helpful person said that he had this problem before (like many others), and suggested that I use the "High-performance NVIDIA processor" instead of the default one.

 

So I will give that a try.
 

 
Thank you for your help, and I will tell you what happens

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Although I concur, I just wanted to say a TDR (that's how we call these type of errors) should not happen. It means something went catastrophically bad in the driver (NVIDIA's problem), a bad shader (Unity's problem), or could be hardware failure.

I can trigger one very easily in my game by trying to bake all my probes in a single frame, which can push the frame-time out to several seconds. Windows/NVidia seem to decide that if your draw-call is taking that long, it must be invalid. On my desktop with a beefy GPU I can actually get away with this, but my laptop TDR's reliably.
 
It actually makes me worry for a lot of my load-time baking stuff -- if I'm going to test out some min-spec laptop in the future and find my game is TDR'ing it :lol:
On console you have a similar problem, but there you simply fail to pass certification for having a several-second frame-time! :D

I know. I've had plenty of TDRs induced by myself. However given it TDRs for him when he "add or move objects in the scene"; I highly doubt that is the case.
 
 

I will try what you suggested, but I would be really amazed if it is something to do with the PSU handling the power or if it is overheating, because this laptop can really deal with a lot of heavy stuff, and the scene I am practicing on only has a few cubes and spheres and no textures almost.

And that is exactly the reason. Half of "heavy games" are CPU bottlenecked (meaning the GPU won't overheat). The other half are GPU bottlenecked but they don't put every single piece of silicon at 100% capacity. Furthermore the CPU is likely sitting idly by until the GPU is ready.
When you're on an empty scene with with barely textures and objects, you manage to put both GPU & CPU at maximum workload; therefore maximizing power draw and temperature (not entirely correct since lack of textures means probably all of the bandwidth will not be burnt).
In other words, a non-VSync empty scene may be more taxing to your system than most heavy AAA games. Enabling VSync stops that though. Edited by Matias Goldberg

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