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BiiXteR

A list of topics you need to know to have learned the basics?

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I'm looking for a list of topics you should know to have completed the C++ basics.

So, a list of everything a C++ beginner should know in order to have completed the basics.

 

Example : 

 

  • Variables
  • Classes
  • Inheritance
  • and so on...

So I know what else I should learn before moving on to the more advanced stuff. :)

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The items you listed have nothing to do with C++ specifically, and are present in most imperative languages created over the last three decades. They are found in hundreds of programming languages. 

 

My list of recommended reading to learn C++.

 

I can't get any books though, which is why I need a list of topics so I can google them instead. :P

And I thought that each language had its own specific features, such as C++ has the auto keyword which other languages don't.

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I'm looking for a list of topics you should know to have completed the C++ basics.

So, a list of everything a C++ beginner should know in order to have completed the basics.
There is knowing and understanding, and they're two very different things.

You should read about variables, classes, inheritance, and debuggers, but that basically makes you aware of their existence. You know it.

 

Understanding is about how to use it. You don't get understanding from reading. Write code, do experiments, read code, modify it. Make it stand upside down because it sounds like a fun thing to try.

 

I'd suggest you do both at the same time. All concepts are related to each other, insight in eg variables in classes will improve understanding of inheritance. They're not independent stand-alone things, it's all connected.

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In no particular order of importance other than what came to mind in what order...

  • Programming Basics(ie. control structures, classes, variables, etc)
  • Operators & operator precedence
  • Memory Management: new, new[], delete, delete[]
  • arrays & pointers (+ references)
  • std::list - std::vector - std::map - iterators (eg. std::vector<int>::iterator or std::list<int>::iterator)
  • object constructors: trivial default constructors, copy constructors, move constructors
  • inheritance & polymorphism / virtual methods
  • overloaded methods & functions
  • stream objects -> std::iostream (std::stringstream, std::fstream)
  • preprocessor directives
  • templates
  • Build Process(ie. compiler, linker) & debugging(ie. breakpoints, memory inspection, variable watch/inspection, call stack, etc)

Seems like the basics to C++ I'd say. Not the easiest language to master. After you know a bit about all of it start learning design patterns.

Edited by coope

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The items you listed have nothing to do with C++ specifically, and are present in most imperative languages created over the last three decades. They are found in hundreds of programming languages. 

 

My list of recommended reading to learn C++.

 

I can't get any books though, which is why I need a list of topics so I can google them instead. :P

And I thought that each language had its own specific features, such as C++ has the auto keyword which other languages don't.

 

Frankly, you really do need a book or teacher to learn to program effectively. Even if you're proficient in a similar language like Java, C++ has enough of it's own concepts that a few online tutorials just don't cut it.

 

Fortunately, there are free online books, if you're tight for cash. For instance checkout this site.

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