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schupf

Level config: One file or multiple?

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Hello!

 

I am writing a puzzle game for iOS and android that has multiple levels (maybe like 20). Currently I describe all my levels via one .xml file. Since each level is relatively simple (shapes at certain positions), the file is not too big.

 

I also plan to offer level packages (lets say 30 levels for 40 cents) via in app shop. Since it is my first app I have a lot of questions about a good file layout suitable for my game.

 

Should I provide one big file that contains ALL possible levels and the available ones (depending on the player's purchases) is only controlled by code? I.e. my game package always contains a config file with all 110 levels and the first 20 are playable. When the player purchases the first level package my code will allow to play the first 50 levels and so on. 

 

Or should I only deliver a level config file containing the first 20 levels and whenever the player purchases a package a separate level file (containing the 30 purchased levels of the package) is downloaded to the device (Is this even possible in the app stores of apple and android?)

 

Thanks for any advice!

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Yes, downloaded packages work.

 

I would allow for reading any number of levels files.

 

I'd probably also provide a way for levels to be assigned a date or version, so a newer data file can replace or augment an existing level that is marked to override the previous edition.

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>> Should I provide one big file that contains ALL possible levels and the available ones (depending on the player's purchases) is only controlled by code? I.e. my game package always contains a config file with all 110 levels and the first 20 are playable.

 

although probably not an issue:

 

"they can't hack what ain't there."

 

i released Caveman v1.3 with registration keycode unlocking of the full version in the downloadable demo. but the keycode checking DRM code had no anti-crack protection whatsoever   the game was cracked by someone in europe, posted to warez site out of africa, with servers in russia. losses were so bad, i had to close Rockland Software Productions. but the game was getting popular by that point, which made it a target for crackers.

 

only include what they pay for, and this can never happen.

 

if the game can be hacked, someone will, just for kicks. if its a cool game, they'll post the crack, not to screw you, but to show how "awesome" they are. how they hurt others in the process probably doesn't even enter their minds.

Edited by Norman Barrows

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