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Hello, im currently in Junior High... I know i may be to young for programming or most might say that but ive been "Programming" for about a year now and selling games to kids in school and such.. Im currently using Delphi 5 Standard. And when i grow up i want to become a computer programmer (like my man DavidRM :-)) Well anyways i was wondering what i can do at this age to become a good programmer of course read books and all that but id like to start off the right way at this age so i can hopefully live off it as i become older. Well any help would be appreciated. Thanks please keep the smart remarks about my age at a minimum) :-)

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Never too young to program. If you can read, you can code.

It sounds like you''re on your way. The little advice I can offer is code, learn C++ one day, code, pay attention to math, and code.

No rush on anything.

I wanna'' ride on the pope mobile.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Well i was thinking about like at 16 learn C++ does that sound good or what?? and speaking of pope mobile... im making a screen saver with a Tali Van...hehe Why not make some cash off the taliban?? Thx for the reply

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Guest Anonymous Poster
1 last thing would u suggest me starting C++ right now???

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How good is your maths? I was good at maths when I was at school but I lost my way when I was at college. All the other coders where I work are great at maths, and it makes me wish I had studied maths to A level (in the UK) rather than just O level. It will never hurt you as a coder to have been top of your class at Maths, in fact you probably need to be at that level (at least) if you are going to do well at 3D coding. For other stuff (AI, sound gameplay) you just need good general logic and coding knowledge.
I wouldnt say you are too young to learn C++.

http://www.positech.co.uk

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Heh Cliffski thanks!

I now know there ARE others out there that ain't so good at Maths and still have a love for making games

Philip Lutas
CEO of Optical Realities

Edited by - lutas on November 20, 2001 10:19:19 AM

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Well i was thinking about like at 16 learn C++ does that sound good or what?? and speaking of pope mobile... im making a screen saver with a Tali Van...hehe Why not make some cash off the taliban?? Thx for the reply




I don't see why not, I've learned the basics of C when I was 9 at a summer camp. So I don't see why you shouldn't learn C/C++ at 16. Anywhow, the choice is yours.



"And that's the bottom line cause I said so!"

Cyberdrek
Headhunter Soft
A division of DLC Multimedia

Resist Windows XP's Invasive Production Activation Technology!

"gitty up" -- Kramer

Edited by - cyberdrek on November 20, 2001 10:33:25 AM

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Well right now im 13 but i mean at what age should i learn C++, and yeah im good at math I go to all the math counts tournaments and all that..... but what do u guys think about starting C++ what age??

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I''d say learn it now. Get one of those C++ for idiots books. You may not know it but C++ is an object oriented language and it can take a year or two before you become good at thinking that way (Obj Orient way).

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Avoid C++ For Dummies . . . not a good book

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Yeah, C++ for dummies is a bad book... I got it and didn't learn a thing from it...

I'd reccommend Sam's Learn C++ in 21 Days. It's really good, in depth, and tells you a lot about the inner workings of the computer.

I'm in Junior High, too, and I only started C++ a couple months ago, but I've programmed a little in Visual Basic for a long time...

Edited by - gone_postal on November 24, 2001 4:07:34 AM

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Guest Anonymous Poster
you can download the book "teach yourself c++ in 21 days" from a web site called www.MAXCODE.com they also have the book "teach yourself visual C++ 6.0 compiler in 21 days" too.

you are never to young to learn and you are never to old to learn it all depends what you are learning for. if you want to make money out of it the younger the better if you are doing it for a hobbie and enjoy programming age doesnt matter.

this is only my opinion dont take this as red. any good luck and keep learning.

I am "BORG" resistance is futile

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Don''t use "Teach yourself visual c++" as a guide to learning c++ !
It''s only useful if you already know c++, but than it''s good.

(It''s next to my screen )

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As far as C++ goes... learn it, because it''s something to put on your CV and people like to know you know how to use C and C++.

However, you''re currently using Delphi - and that''s the best thing you could possibly be doing. Delphi is an excellent language. There''s nothing you can do in C++ you can''t do in Delphi, and it''s a more elegant and better constructed language.

People who haven''t used it tend to fob it off as being Pascal or VB-like, but everyone I''ve ever heard of who has started using it after using C has never wanted to move back.

Most of this is my opinion, of course, but feel free to ask some Delphi-users about it. There are plenty of forums. I know there are several who use gamedev.net as well.

So, as far as advice goes: sure, learn C and C++. Don''t try to make them your main language. Continue with Delphi. Have a look at some of the more advanced techniques - learn about pointers, RTTI etc (which I don''t think C++ has, actually.). It''s fully object-oriented and is probably a much better learning language than C.

After all, it''s easier to translate from Delphi to C++ than it is the other way round

That''s about it. Hope it''s not too incoherent, it''s 1:00 am here

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Languages are tools. Language fanaticism is idiocy.

As a professional programmer, should you decide to become one, you may be asked to develop using a variety of languages (which you may not consider the most appropriate for the task). The point is that the underlying basic concepts - variables, loops/iterations, branches/conditionals, etc - are all the same regardless of language. It may be more difficult to represent higher level contructs (data structures and classes/methods in assembly, anyone?) but your objective should be to learn the principles in as language-independent a manner as possible.

I realize you''re just starting out and I shouldn''t confuse you, but don''t get bound to any one language (as many lesser idiots do, going as far as starting flamewars over whether C++ is superior to C/Java/C#/VB/[insert preferred language here]).

Good luck.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Oluseyi is right! Languages are tools, and there is no such thing as the perfect language.

But still there are some advantages and disadvantages. For example see Delphi. It''s a very popular language, and it may even be a good language (I don''t know, never used it so far.), but there is one problem. It''s only being developed by Inprise/Borland, and only for Win32 and I think Linux under the name of Kylix (not sure about that). So what if Borland decides to stop development? No more updates, no more api''s for new technologies. Kind of a problem.

More likely, what if you want to port your code to, lets say, a Mac. No Delphi for Macs!

If you use C++, there is *always* a compiler for C++ for any platform. So no problem here. And C++ is an international specification, so no problem, when your favorite company quits, there is always another one.

These are arguments for using C++.

Now for the question wether you should learn C++ or not: Learn it! It is something like the semi-official standard for professional projects, so if you can say you have x+ years of C++ experience, you sound very professional .

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Thanks Anonymous Poster for that info about C++ in 21 days. I''ve been struggling with C++ for dummies. I just downloaded the book from maxsource.com. Maybe this is just what I need to make sense out the parts in C++ for dummies that confused me.

Anyway, thanks again. Thanks to all the other posters too for their input on the original posters questions. This has been some help to me as well.

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