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SonShadowCat

is it best to just use references all the time?

7 posts in this topic

since im not a alien braniac i cannot remember all the functions that i must use, therefore i ask, should i just try harder to remember or should i constantly look at reference material? thx "Those who serve no purpose, have no purpose"
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Most of us will never remember all the details so we have to use reference material. One of the most important features of your programming tools is how good they can help with this. In emacs can you use ALT+/ to complete the word. Many IDEs is showing a parameter list once you typed ( in a function call. Linux users has man and info followed by the function name. PFE lets you set up a help file that is searched once you press a key combination.

I do not know which one is the best but this is something that is used all the time.

Edited by - Obelix on November 20, 2001 12:52:30 AM
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Your question also sets out a benefit of writing good solid/robust - and thus reusable code - next time you won''t have to slog through the references as much - if at all. For the routines used most frequently - eg. fopen, fclose - you''ll have them memorized in no time - but if you have a difficult time remembering you can always tattoo the syntax on your arms - like in that movie :-) Seriously, though, just like with ''natural'' languages it takes practice and usage - in a few months you''ll be coding as easily as you speak or write - but remember that even the best writers use dictionaries.
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No-one remembers everything, and I think everyone uses references. Try to remember what you can, but don''t overdo it.
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Oh really? When I was 2 years old, I recall an alien coming out from under my bed. I then picked up my laser gun, and shot it. Yup, I got perfect memory! :D


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The truth of the matter is that we remember what we choose to remember. Throughout my life I have met two types of people: Those who forget, and those who do not. I beleive that we dismiss anything that we do not find relevant to what we want to do or plan to do unless it is stressed upon us.

This in turn does NOT classify anyone who does not remember as someone who _chooses_ not to remember. Rather, it depicts them as someone who may think that as long as the knowledge is available, there is no need to stress over learning it.

Though this may not be true in your case, I do have empathy towards your situation. Not remembering code is something that everyone does, especially if they are alchoholic. =)

The way that I managed to overcome my lack of remembering things is to dedicate a spiral notebook to OpenGL notes. Trust me, it helps. I found that most people, after writing it down, might remember it easier. Even if you don''t ever refer to the notebook, the important thing to know is that you wrote it down, and hopefully you wrote it so that you can understand it.

I hope this helps somehow. As someone who has seen many proggers come and go, I am telling you now that memorization is a good tool, but there is really no serious difference between memorization and references.

But honestly, try as best you can to remember at least the basic commands. If you want an impetus, think of it as a personal challenge; That''s how I did it. =)
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lol *HICUP* im an alcoholic learning OGL

thx for all the responses guys i really appreciate it

i have memorized the basic functions, but im having trouble
i think ill take notes

"Those who serve no purpose, have no purpose"
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Remembering Opengl syntax and commands, and the syntax and keywords and whatnot of any language really isn't necessary. It's not like you're gonna be stopped on the street and be asked to break out a bubble sort that compiles without any problems on a piece of line paper. You will tend to remember more and more of the often used stuff though, but don't waste time trying to memorize that kind of thing.

------------
- outRider -

Edited by - outRider on November 22, 2001 10:19:13 PM
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