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CodisStudios

Starting Point For Game Development as a Career

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Hello to all 

I have recently taken an online course in Unity and a host of other programs like Maya,Mudbox,3DS Max and Photoshop.The issue I am having is where do I start in terms of game development professionally.I am a beginner so I am looking for any opportunity to learn and grow as a Game Designer are they any websites that are recruiting beginners for any kinda of work or practice in Game Design?I have been fiddling and learning for about 6 months now and have created some pretty basic levels as well as experimentation with primitive modelling in Maya and a bit of animation.Any tips ,advice or pointers that can lead me in a good direction are most greatly appreciated.Anyone care to give it a shot? :rolleyes:  :D

Edited by CodisStudios

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I would suggest just making games. Test your skills with those tools to make a small game from start to finish; focus on the aspects that you'd want to showcase to an employer (do you want to be an artist? make the art stand out!).

 

Each position you apply for is going to want different things, but most of them don't want just "experience with x", they want "experience developing with x" (meaning working on a project as a whole, and often time shipping the project).

 

The absolute most surefire way (that may be an exaggeration) to find out what you need to do to get a job in game development is to look at job-postings (there are a lot of game-dev jobs posted on job boards on the internet) and look at what they want.

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1. Subject: Starting Point For Game Designing as a Career
2. I have recently taken an online course in Unity and a host of other programs like Maya,Mudbox,3DS Max
and Photoshop.
3. are they any websites that are recruiting beginners for any kinda of work or practice in Game Design?
4. I have ... created some pretty basic levels as well as experimentation with primitive modelling in
Maya and a bit of animation.


Codis, your subject line talks of game design, but point 2 talks about art. Your point 4 talks about
art, and touches tangentially on level design. You aren't talking about a career in game design but rather art, and
maybe level design. Accordingly, I'm changing the title of your post (because it's misleading),
changing "Designing" to "Development." I hope you understand the difference.

3. Your question 3 is confusing: you're not looking for opportunities in companies or indie dev groups but
rather websites? As an admitted beginner, I think your best bet would be to look for a group of other
beginners. Try the Classifieds section of this website. Good luck!

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Do you want to become a game programmer or game artist or both?
You've told about your experience about modeling and animation, but what about Unity and programming in general?

If you want to do game programming, I've written one answer over here.
 

I am a beginner so I am looking for any opportunity to learn and grow as a Game Designer are they any websites that are recruiting beginners for any kinda of work or practice in Game Design?

 

You are probably confused between game design and game art.

Game Design is about the idea, story behind the game.

Game Art is about creating graphics, music, art, etc for a game.

 

As for recruitment, you can probably check the Classifieds section (as mentioned above).

Or you can just continue doing game art, master it and become an freelancer.

 

Even check out this website: http://www.gamecareerguide.com

Edited by Tanay Karnik

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I do apologize for the unclear questions. What I mean is game development in its entirety.Level Design, Character Design,Scripting and so on.I have experience in Unity with C# scripting and have built a pretty small level as well but never built anything to ship to any particular setting or device( IOS,Android,Pc etc).The code side of gaming would be alot simpler for me as I have experience with coding c++,Python and a bit of Java here and there.As for the art aspect my original profession as a tattoo artist gives me a firm art base in terms of imagination however the digital medium did prove to be quite different in terms of art,so I am still currently adjusting to the concepts as opposed to ink and skin lol. I have been gaming for my whole life and I never once figured I could actually make my own games until I stumbled upon Unity.I did some terrain sculpting,basic scripting for trigger events and character movement as well as  camera movement in C # since that is used in Unity's MonoDevelop. I do agree with the post mentioning the game loop process as I found that quite challenging with the multiple brackets containing different elements of code.I practice everyday on Unity so far and feel quite comfortable with the tools so far and moving around the interface(Inspector,Hierarchy etc).I will take the advice received thus far and make and experiment with making my own games.I do intend to be an indie developer at least to start to possibly make some cool fighting games.May start with a stick figure game just to grasp the basic concepts nothing to hard or diverse.But it was a thought I had as to whether I could get some kind of junior position(kinda like a trainee)to gain experience as well as a small income source in the process of growing and learning, 

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it was a thought I had as to whether I could get some kind of junior position(kinda like a trainee)to gain experience as well as a small income source in the process of growing and learning,


Not really, no. You can't get trained on the job from where you are at present.
If your question is how to get a job, this needs to be moved to the Game Industry Job Advice forum.
We will probably need to know these facts about you:
1. How old are you?
2. What's your level of education?
3. What's your current occupation? (If student: "student")
4. Which game job, if any, do you aspire to or plan to study for? Can you choose a favorite?
5. And depending on your question, we may need to know what country you live in (where in the world are you?).

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I am 23 years of age
I currently do online courses for game development on Udemy after having to drop our of college(unfortunate but happens).I would consider my self a student though I may not officially be.I currently live in the Caribbean island Barbados.If possible any position so long as it is making games will do I plan to be able to make games alone(small ones)but any area is fine the course I am doing is Become A Game Designer(Master Series) on Udemy by School Of Interactive Design.This covers a wide range of items so any area I can grow in is fine.

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I am 23 years of age
I currently do online courses for game development on Udemy after having to drop our of college(unfortunate but happens).I would consider my self a student though I may not officially be.I currently live in the Caribbean island Barbados.If possible any position so long as it is making games will do I plan to be able to make games alone(small ones)but any area is fine the course I am doing is Become A Game Designer(Master Series) on Udemy by School Of Interactive Design.This covers a wide range of items so any area I can grow in is fine.

 

1) Are you ready to move? Worldwide? I am not sure how many game studios are located on Barbados.

 

2) Colleged Dropout... ouch. Now, let me tell you this to begin with: I am the last guy promoting college and universities as necessities to LEARN. Universities are pretty bad places to learn anything actually in some cases.

 

But: Game Development is a very, very, VERY competitive environment. Like Modelling, or Acting, there are few positions available, and a TON of talented young people trying to get into these few positions.

While a degree alone is certainly not enough (your portfolio of personal projects will count just as much), EVERYTHING counts when applying for your first job. With every new job you work some years on, the importance of that degree will shrink, as you build up work expierience...

 

Where you stand now, I would either urge you to look at possible alternatives to get a degree SOMEHOW (where I live, there are many options for people to complete their degree while working on a job for example).

Or to consider other jobs in other industries. Just as a back up.

 

3) Besides small Indie Studios and self employed work, it seems there is little need for a jack of all trades game developer. It is certainly good to know stuff beyond and above the specialization you are gonna pick, especially if you want to move up the career ladder later on. But at your current position, you will end up as a cogwheel in the studio, doing specialized work. Make sure you are fit for that specialization.

And no, don't blindly trust your school to teach you what is actually needed in the industry. Many "Game Design" Schools train Jack of all trades, for various reasons... that doesn't mean jack of all trades are in high demands.

 

4) Don't expect a studio to take you in as a trainee and allow you to grow on the job. That makes sense in industrys where there is not enough talent available, or there are many open positions. None of it is true in the game dev field. Either you are good from day one, or you might not find a lot of chances to get in.

 

There are entry level positions that MIGHT be open to you though. QA, as a tester, is known as an entry level position open to people without a lot of qualifications. Of course, unless you want to be stuck in QA for the rest of your career, you need to show a lot of skill and dedication both in your daily work as a QA Tester, and beyond what is expected of you... then you might get the chance to move on into a different department, like game or level design. I heard stories of people also moving on to programming, given of course enough skill and the ability to show it to superiors.

 

Level design is also often an entry level occupation. Though your competition at that point most probably will be much fiercer, including people with degrees. How your online schools degree compares here IDK, but generally the more "classical" a degree is, the higher its worth in the eyes of a future employer. So compared with someone having a degree of a known brick-and-mortar university, you will be at a disadvantage. If you want to get a job in level design, you will NEED a very convincing portfolio of prior work... so start doing level design NOW, and strive to get exceptionally good at it.

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Getting a career in games is going to require some more work on your part, and some big changes.
I assume in studying through Udemy, your short-term goal is to get a degree.
Then you need to work on some projects to build a portfolio.
Then you'll have to either move from Barbados or start a game company there yourself.
These articles might be helpful for you:
http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson27.htm
http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson64.htm
http://www.sloperama.com/advice/m73.htm
http://www.sloperama.com/advice/m84.htm
http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson29.htm

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Huh, we aren't in very different situations.

 

I'd recommend seeing or meeting people working on games. If the community seems non-existent, that's probably not true. there's likely someone. or you can start one. you can just find other likeminded people and work together / learn together / discuss.

 

after seeing people from brazil make their way to the states to talk about their company, what they are doing to grow the game dev community there, while trying to get recognition as an actual industry from the government, being too stuck on place is odd.

 

so .. figure it out.

 

it took me a while to find the game dev scene in the east coast just starting out, with no game dev friends. :( was pretty sad.

it's a lot better now. there is a bustling scene where i am.

 

game jams are great too to test how much you can do.

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