• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Is it C# Territory?

This topic is 712 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Is C# a suitable platform for CAD/Graphics applications? Why yes and why not? As far as I know all CAD/Graphics software are written using C/C++. There must be a good reason for it. Thanks.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

I think most CAD software predates C#. And also predates Mono (which means they would have been non crossplatform).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your good reason is "We have hundreds of thousands of man hours invested in our giant aging C++ code base, thus we'll be keeping that around. kthxbye."

 

Sunk cost fallacy...

 

A good reason would involve comparing the expected results of the new product against the quality of the existing product to see if the value of improvement exceeds the implementation cost and risks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your good reason is "We have hundreds of thousands of man hours invested in our giant aging C++ code base, thus we'll be keeping that around. kthxbye."

 

That, and "everyone here knows C++ so we're more comfortable using it".

 

Those two together answer 90% of "why did they use this language" questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on the company, I think AutoDesk has some products that you can interop with C#. Others, like my company (e.g. https://www.bentley.com/en/products/brands/openroads) use a mix of C++ and C#...many of our power applications sit ontop of a C++ platform for graphics, element storage, etc but a lot of the business logic and UI are in C#.

 

C# is more than suitable for a robust graphics application however, you will need to care more about memory management than a typical C# programmer may (e.g., the upcoming language feature of "ref returns" is a big deal to us, but at the //BUILD conference this year it kind of just was shoehorned into the C# team's presentation).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Your good reason is "We have hundreds of thousands of man hours invested in our giant aging C++ code base, thus we'll be keeping that around. kthxbye."

 

Sunk cost fallacy...

 

A good reason would involve comparing the expected results of the new product against the quality of the existing product to see if the value of improvement exceeds the implementation cost and risks.

 

 

... and that cost would be hundreds of millions of dollars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That sounds an awful lot like comparing the expected results of the new product against the quality of the existing product to see if the value of improvement exceeds the implementation cost and risks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement