Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
XXOXX123456

my C++ console 3D fps Game on Windows from scratch

This topic is 855 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Advertisement

Awesome, would love to read some form of post-mortem, i.e unexpected difficulties, what went right/wrong and how you designed the software renderer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome, would love to read some form of post-mortem, i.e unexpected difficulties, what went right/wrong and how you designed the software renderer.

yeah sure, I would love to share.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>> color = Lerp(Background,Foreground,percent of coverage)

 

a clever re-mappiing.

 

reminds me of when i used to remap 24bit targa povray renders to 256 color palettized bitmaps for a 3D blitter engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pretty cool! I’ve done something similar:


The color space was generated by combining a combination of foreground colors, background colors, and the three fill chars:

U+0032 ' ' 0%
U+2591 '?' 25%
U+2592 '?' 50%
U+2593 '?' 75%


After throwing out duplicates, there were about 360 unique colors. I then used voro++ to do fast nearest-neighbor lookup in 3d space.
Then the process was rendering to an 80x60 image, then transforming (r,g,b) to (foreground,background,char) and sending it to the GPU to render.


But now with Windows 10, the terminals are all different P: Edited by fastcall22

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty cool! I’ve done something similar:



The color space was generated by combining a combination of foreground colors, background colors, and the three fill chars:

U+0032 ' ' 0%
U+2591 '?' 25%
U+2592 '?' 50%
U+2593 '?' 75%


After throwing out duplicates, there were about 360 unique colors. I then used voro++ to do fast nearest-neighbor lookup in 3d space.
Then the process was rendering to an 80x60 image, then transforming (r,g,b) to (foreground,background,char) and sending it to the GPU to render.


But now with Windows 10, the terminals are all different P:

Those 3 unicode chars seems too hard to find= =. But yeah, looking up color is implemented by finding the nearest color point in terms of Euclidean distance, as you said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>> But yeah, looking up color is implemented by finding the nearest color point in terms of Euclidean distance

 

3d space color mapping is the standard method. i was using it too back in the mid to late 1990's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>> But yeah, looking up color is implemented by finding the nearest color point in terms of Euclidean distance

 

3d space color mapping is the standard method. i was using it too back in the mid to late 1990's.

Woa, seems that you got a lot of stories to tell :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>> Woa, seems that you got a lot of stories to tell  :)

 

the  company slogan on my signature block is for real. 

 

"building PC games since 1989"

 

and that's when i started publishing my games, not when i started making PC games. i started writing PC games in 1982. and my first real computer game ever was a lunar lander clone for the IBM 360 mainframe in 1978.

 

so yeah, you could say i've seen it all.  all the way back to COBOL and punch cards and 24 hour turnaround times for submitting and running a job.

Edited by Norman Barrows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Now translate it into ANSI escape sequences and provide it on a port you can telnet to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!