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Spaghetti code

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I've been doing a lot of development in Labview recently at my dayjob and I just realized it's probably the best programming language to make actual spaghetti code. I'm currently struggling refactoring it to make it maintainable the next time I'll have to look into it in 6 months.

[attachment=31987:labview.png]

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It depends on the problem to solve. I think that if you need to process an XML file, Labview will jump right at the 1st position :D

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Now a days a lot of so called AAA-Indie hybrid game codes are dice cut spaghetti visualized in VR layed across continents. With groups getting smaller and smaller and spread across the world in a soup,  farther and farther away from bigger cities, and to the remotest tire two or three cities, into their garages.

 

Most of the bugs are version control related and quite a lot are novice.

 

Experienced game developers are just too good experienced, enough to be head hunted by companies of another industry that have huge patience for deadlines and a lot of coffers filled with generous cash to the tops. And a whole lot better perks.

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I'm pretty sure the best "spaghetti" environments are:

  1. Matlab
  2. Visual Basic
  3. Javascript
  4. Simulink
  5. Labview

Sadly, you're only 5th.   :cool:

 

I have a particular vendor-developed application at work, that I inherited :(, where the only enhancement portions of the application that aren't black-boxed by the vendor is the database.

Which means all business logic is written in the forms of sprocs and triggers.

Which means after 15 years of multiple developers digging their grubby hands in the database, it's become a Cthulu named SQL.

It's scares me.

Edited by Resomaut

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I started one job maintaining a backend server that was of absolute critical importance to the company, and operated on a state machine where each transaction used a struct with the variables i,j,k.

The moment I got free reign to clean the application up, my first checkin read something like "cleaned up some stupid variable names that have been in place since 2009".  The changelist was about fifteen files, one of them being a file that clocked in at over 12000 lines long.  I think that speaks for itself.

 

 

I'm pretty sure the best "spaghetti" environments are:

  1. Matlab
  2. Visual Basic
  3. Javascript
  4. Simulink
  5. Labview

Sadly, you're only 5th.   :cool:

Haven't used Matlab, but the Maple projects I wrote as a senior in CS looked worse than the ruby programs I wrote when I was learning to code in High School, and ruby isn't exactly known for clean structured code to begin with.

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I've been doing a lot of development in Labview recently at my dayjob and I just realized it's probably the best programming language to make actual spaghetti code. I'm currently struggling refactoring it to make it maintainable the next time I'll have to look into it in 6 months.

attachicon.giflabview.png

Labview, that is a love/hate relationship.  Unfortunately, its not really feasible to "write" useful "code" in labview without it becoming spaghetti.  My suggestion is use labview to handle the GUI stuff, and pipe all the data from the various dials etc into a DLL, then use C++ or your favorite language to do the actual computation and export it to labview for display.

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