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AverageGuyBigDreams

RPG Style Game. Every Position Needed!

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Would help if you put up the programming language, engine, resources, etc...

Thanks for the tips!

Right now I was planning on using C++ with Unreal Engine 4.

It is a free engine and can produce many great things. Games such as the borderlands series came from the Unreal Engines.

Not completely sure what you mean by resources since it is a pretty vague term.

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I think people will appreciate it a lot if you'd tell them what your role in the project is.

From your current post it looks to people like you want to be the idea guy

and usually people do not want to work with the idea guy.

 

http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/business/production-and-management/never-team-up-with-the-idea-guy-r3088T

That's a very good point. I also want to point out that someone has to have an idea of where to start. When you say idea guy, I'm assuming you mean someone that does nothing but comes up with the ideas so it can be very frustrating for the team that works with him to fully understand and deliver exactly what he wants. I will be coding, (attempting) 3d modeling, and anything else that I can. (I didn't click on the link, sorry)

 

I lied, I read it and I can see how you got that out of my post. I will mainly be coding, depending on the size and everything else that happens I will (attempt) to 3d model but I've got a ton to learn in that aspect. 

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I'd love to help, on creative side of it story and game world and history of the game world lore etc,if u need it, just let as know

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A Zelda and Dark Souls mix... that would be really interesting to say the least.

 

By the way, if you want audio stuff (composing, ambiance, maybe a few sound effects, etc.), I can definitely be of assistance.

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Heya, I've been knocking around this forum and it's about time I jumped into a project, so here goes.

My name is Alex, I'm 24 and have just finished my degree in digital media production. Due to my background in media production, I'm pretty good at video editing and know my way around programs such as Premier Pro, After Effects and Photoshop. However my real passion is script writing and storytelling. As such I am great at characters, dialogue, quest design, world building and other related tasks. I also have a little experience in 3d modeling in Blender. I'd like to use this opportunity to grow these skills though, as well as learn some coding.

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This is a really ambitious project that has no guarantees. This game is all about creating an amazing experience for the next generation. I want to give them the same amazing experience that I had with games that I grew up with.

 

 

Hi. I was hoping to offer some advice, as many years ago I came to these forums announcing a RPG project of my own (that I continue working on). It sounds like you are new to game development (apologies if I'm mistaken), so I wanted to give you some recommendations based on my own experience.

 

 

1) Start Small and Expand

Even simple 2D RPGs take A LOT of time and effort to build. I know this better than most anyone. Our team originally had planned to develop the first chapter of the game and release in an episodic model. Well, even what we wanted to do in that first chapter turned out to be too complicated. Instead, what we ended up doing was to first make a "tech demo" demonstrating basic gameplay. From there, we produced a few different "mini RPGs" that had a playtime of 20-30 minutes. Only after we had been able to get this far did we have most of the necessary technology and content to really begin producing our final product.

 

2) Don't Create from Scratch

Specifically, I'm speaking about building your engine from scratch. We decided to do that (or rather, we were so damn ignorant we didn't even realize that using an existing engine was a viable option) and we spent our first two years mostly doing engine development as a result, instead of working on the game itself. Building your own engine will give you a better learning experience, but that's about the only real benefit for a small part-time team. I'd also recommend using freely available assets (legally) from sources like opengameart.org starting out. Trying to create all your artwork from scratch, especially if you are relying entirely on unpaid work, is very, very difficult even if your project is popular. You can always replace shared/placeholder art with custom made art later.

 

3) Don't Over-design Upfront

In my project's beginning, we spent the first few weeks nailing down every minor detail of features we wanted to see in the game before we really got started. This was somewhat of a mistake for a couple reasons. First, we were nowhere near ready to implement most of the features we desired to have. Second, by the time we were ready to implement the features, those early team members had all been replaced by new ones, who weren't completely sold on the ideas of the past team. As a result, we questioned whether a lot of those old ideas made sense, and ended up throwing out or replacing several of them.

 

It's good to have a general "loose" design starting up so that you are all on the same page though. I'd hash out the major features you want the game to have first with your team, and worry about the details later once you have a playable demo up and running.

 

 

Hope that helps you out. Good luck!

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I'm looking to offer my skills as an artist to my first game, no matter how small. I ought to be able to do concept art, armor and enemy design, and I have a very good grasp of gameplay mechanics and understanding, so if there are testing phases I can help there too. I'm currently in my last year at university, so I'm trying to get something worked on before I get out there. I hope to become a concept artist, and maybe art director in the future, so I want to try my hand at this for experience.

 

That said, what direction are we going for visuals? Do you already have some kind of narrative framework to work with?

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This is a really ambitious project that has no guarantees. This game is all about creating an amazing experience for the next generation. I want to give them the same amazing experience that I had with games that I grew up with.

 

 

Hi. I was hoping to offer some advice, as many years ago I came to these forums announcing a RPG project of my own (that I continue working on). It sounds like you are new to game development (apologies if I'm mistaken), so I wanted to give you some recommendations based on my own experience.

 

 

1) Start Small and Expand

Even simple 2D RPGs take A LOT of time and effort to build. I know this better than most anyone. Our team originally had planned to develop the first chapter of the game and release in an episodic model. Well, even what we wanted to do in that first chapter turned out to be too complicated. Instead, what we ended up doing was to first make a "tech demo" demonstrating basic gameplay. From there, we produced a few different "mini RPGs" that had a playtime of 20-30 minutes. Only after we had been able to get this far did we have most of the necessary technology and content to really begin producing our final product.

 

2) Don't Create from Scratch

Specifically, I'm speaking about building your engine from scratch. We decided to do that (or rather, we were so damn ignorant we didn't even realize that using an existing engine was a viable option) and we spent our first two years mostly doing engine development as a result, instead of working on the game itself. Building your own engine will give you a better learning experience, but that's about the only real benefit for a small part-time team. I'd also recommend using freely available assets (legally) from sources like opengameart.org starting out. Trying to create all your artwork from scratch, especially if you are relying entirely on unpaid work, is very, very difficult even if your project is popular. You can always replace shared/placeholder art with custom made art later.

 

3) Don't Over-design Upfront

In my project's beginning, we spent the first few weeks nailing down every minor detail of features we wanted to see in the game before we really got started. This was somewhat of a mistake for a couple reasons. First, we were nowhere near ready to implement most of the features we desired to have. Second, by the time we were ready to implement the features, those early team members had all been replaced by new ones, who weren't completely sold on the ideas of the past team. As a result, we questioned whether a lot of those old ideas made sense, and ended up throwing out or replacing several of them.

 

It's good to have a general "loose" design starting up so that you are all on the same page though. I'd hash out the major features you want the game to have first with your team, and worry about the details later once you have a playable demo up and running.

 

 

Hope that helps you out. Good luck!

 

Thanks a ton for the input! I definitely have thought of some of these things. Yes I am still pretty new to game development. I was planning on getting a few things down to produce a small demo of gameplay, not much story will matter in the first demo.

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I agree with Roots, but I am not as nice of a person, kudos Roots for advice well given.

 

The lack of details in this post is amazing. 

 

I am sorry, but this sounds a bit over reaching, and is made even more worrisome by the very nature of its ambiguity. 

 

The fact that you call for every position also raises some questions.

 

1. What active role would you take on in development? (besides owning the idea)

2. How much do you know about any one aspect of development. (Can you actively produce things?  (write code? create assets? music?))

3. What is the core mechanic of this game, and does it make for fun, unique, or engaging game play?

4. What game engine were you looking at? Unity, UR, a house engine?

5. Is there any concept art? (proof of concept would go a long way.)

 

OK so you're new to game development.  I cannot say that I am an expert, but I would give you the following advice, plucked from my experiences.

 

1. Start small, and by small I mean damn near microscopic.

2. Pick up an aspect of game development, and practice it, everyday.(coding is good if you have a clear big picture in your head.  it also lets you prototype ideas.)

3. Realize that as a new developer, and without a huge... (and I mean huge.) team, you will not make games to the scale of big studios(see 1.)

4. Concentrate on making something fun to play, hell, concentrate on making something YOURSELF, ANYTHING, even if that something is completely broken!

5. Realize that this is a pursuit that takes years, will have it's ups and downs, and there will be No Instant Gratification.

6. Have fun!! If you are not having fun, well, you should be doing something else ;)

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I can work in buisness, music, programming(Not the best at any language but decent at a very large amount. I need some experience working with a team. Are you interested?

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