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Linux for game development

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I plan to use Linux for game development. I looked around a bit for a dist then i looked at
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1b/Linux_Distribution_Timeline.svg and now I'm really confused.

I have a Intel CPU and a NVIDIA Gefore GTX 560. I will code in C++ and Lua and also use QT for user interface. Anyone that use Linux for development and have an good idea what dist to use? It looks like there are dragons out there among the dists ;).

Edited by Spinningcubes

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LOL  :)

Yep, there are lots and lots of Linux distributions. 90% isn't very relevant though.

I'd just stick with the large ones

 

- Debian

- RedHat

- Suse (don't know anything about it, except it's one of the bigger ones)

 

Biggest difference is how old is the software they use, and how well do they support non-free software.

Server-oriented distributions tend to have long life software (ie ancient, 5-7 years old)

Desktop/mobile oriented distributions tend to have newer software

Bleeding edge software distributions also exist, eg Arch (which I heard is nice too)

 

Server version is extremely stable. In terms of open source software, it's ancient. It works well if you stay inside their domain, just don't try to build anything random from the Internet at these machines, since all software is too old then.

 

The bleeding edge systems do almost daily updates. Things break sometimes, and you need to know your way around a unix system at least somewhat (or at least that's useful).

 

Desktop is a bit in-between. You can keep the same release for a few years, and do updates without much problems, in general.

 

 

One thing important is that their free software repository is huge. Pretty much anything is standard available. Getting it all from the same repository/release has the advantage that things are compiled to work together.

 

Since non-free software doesn't go well with free licenses, and giving away copies for free, no distribution distributes that software on the install media. You can enable additional repositories after install, and then you can pretty much get a lot of the stuff, eg Fedora does the non-free nvidia driver that way (others probably do too, but never tried that).

 

 

Debian is very mature, many professional devs use it (mostly not games, but that holds for all linuxes).

It knows 3 variations, from 'testing' (ie desktop) to 'stable' iirc (server).

 

Well known derived distribution is Ubuntu. Used by lots of newbies, so forums with Ubuntu tend to provide sledge-hammer solutions (become root, hack some system file, problem solved!). At times, Ubuntu makes strange choices. It aims to provide a complete environment, and is less fuzzy about non-free software (its software center eg has commercial and non-commercial items right next to each other). It has LTS versions (long life time support) and non-LTS (normal desktop). Since it's derived from Debian, much of Debian things also apply at Ubunutu (eg saner forum advice :P ).

 

Redhat is also a long time player.

Its server version is RedHat Enterprise, which comes with commercial support iirc. For just the software, you can use Centos (copy of Enterprise, but no (or not much) support from them).

At the other end is Fedora, very close to bleeding edge. Release cycle is 6 months, life time of a release is 1 year.

Edited by Alberth

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Once In a while I use Linux for development, but Windows is still my weapon of choice:

 

@work we use CentOS

@home Ubuntu

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I recommend you grab a Live CD or USB boot of some different distros to find one you like. I'm currently using Linux Mint with the Cinnamon desktop, but in the past I've used many other different distros. Although it's easy to get confused, given the number of different distros available, it's helpful to remember that many of them work the same way. Anything based on Debian, for example (Ubuntu, Mint, etc...) is going to be centered around the same basic tools for package management, as is anything based on Red Hat. You've got a few different choices for the actual presentation of the desktop, such as Gnome, KDE, Cinnamon, etc... But ultimately, they all basically work the same.

I'd second Bregma's advice for Fedora, Ubuntu or Mint, with a slight personal preferential lean toward Ubuntu and Mint rather than Fedora. You can read about creating a live bootable USB for Ubuntu at http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/create-a-usb-stick-on-ubuntu and a live USB for Mint at https://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/744

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 I will code in C++ and Lua and also use QT for user interface. 

 

Out of curiosity, why use Lua?  I mean, why not just use c++ for all your code.  What's the specific use case that you have that you need Lua for?

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I plan to use Linux for game development. I looked around a bit for a dist then i looked at
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1b/Linux_Distribution_Timeline.svg and now I'm really confused.

I have a Intel CPU and a NVIDIA Gefore GTX 560. I will code in C++ and Lua and also use QT for user interface. Anyone that use Linux for development and have an good idea what dist to use? It looks like there are dragons out there among the dists ;).

 

Just yesterday I installed Qt 5.6 LTS on a VM running Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Qt 5.6 LTS is only officially supported on 14.04 at the moment, though) – not so much because of Qt itself, but because of Qt Creator and qbs. I built and tested LuaPlus with those.

 

For Lua, there's ZeroBrane Studio, which supports LÖVE and several other game engines. I just installed it on the same Ubuntu VM and it worked well.

 

I use those on Windows to develop in C++ and Lua, and like them a lot. So, if you need to switch between development machines and/or need multiplatform support, they're good options.

Edited by georger.araujo

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 I will code in C++ and Lua and also use QT for user interface. 

 

Out of curiosity, why use Lua?  I mean, why not just use c++ for all your code.  What's the specific use case that you have that you need Lua for?

 

 

There are several compelling reasons for embedding Lua as a scripting language.

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 I will code in C++ and Lua and also use QT for user interface. 

 

Out of curiosity, why use Lua?  I mean, why not just use c++ for all your code.  What's the specific use case that you have that you need Lua for?

 

 

There are several compelling reasons for embedding Lua as a scripting language.

 

 

My question was about the OP's specific situation.

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Using Eclipse CDT and qtcreator on Ubuntu 16.04. Very easy to install stuff with synaptic and I even like the Unity gui.

 

http://distrowatch.com/

Edited by FGFS

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