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Angelic Ice

C++ Book to revise my Knowledge

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Hello forum!

 

Recently, I'm looking for a book about C++.

 

I have previous programming experience and even some in C++. However, I'm afraid doing bad practises in certain areas (as I learned from various resources on the internet).

Therefore, I had the idea to maybe grasp a book that teaches C++ from the beginning (not sure if I really need to go back all the way) in order to revise my bad habit.

On the other side, the book should cover C++ 11 and 14.

 

I took a look at this resource:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/the-definitive-c-book-guide-and-list

To learn the language itself and being updated for 11 and 14, I could only find: Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++

While they say, this book is not only for beginners, I found sme people saying the opposite.

 

Also took a look at Effective Modern C++, though this pretty much seems for improving on patterns and general practises.

 

I hope you could support a book that fits to me : )

 

Thanks a lot for taking your time to read my thread!

 

 

 

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I would go for a recent book by Stroustrup, the author of C++.

 

I have the C++ programming language, 3rd edition (2009, ie ancient history :P ), and he explains things very clearly, The more important part, he explains a lot of the ideas behind the language, and how you can use it efficiently to solve your problems. That is, not just the language, but also why it is designed this way, and how you can use that.

 

It's very readable for beginners, but not really aimed at them. He explains all the parts of the language (and stl, and templates, etc), but he doesn't really take your hand. No big listings, just a lot of very small ones, explaining the points he wants to make.

 

It one of the few books where I read about his programming advice several times, and every now and then I still pick it up to find some small detail (although it's showing its age by now).

 

 

Unfortunately, I have not read a more recent version, but I trust it's of the same quality.

Edited by Alberth

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I disagree with the Stroustrup book. Back in the 1980s his was the only book on the language, so that was all there was. He hasn't been at the helm of the language for two decades, it grew far beyond any individual many years ago. These days his books are interesting for historical notes, but there are more effective teachers out there.

For dead-tree books, Meyer's "Effective Modern C++" is fairly good if you are planning on picking up the big things that changed. Beyond that, a bit of web searches for conference presentations and training material that can educate you on the key useful tidbits.

If you're looking for a particularly in-depth dive, more like an academic course on all the corners and edges, The C++ Standard Library by Josuttis -- the second edition which was updated to C++11 standard -- will get into the nuts and bolts of the language library and covers good chunks of the core features as well.

I haven't read it yet but I've heard Discovering Modern C++ by Peter Gottschling is also fairly good for a more modern resource if you've already got some background.

And finally, if this is just dabbling and you don't care about waiting another year, the language standard is being finalized for the 2017 major update. A new round of books will come out starting in the middle of next year once the final draft gets ratified.

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Thanks a lot for your replies : )

 

I considered Stroustrup, too, since his book covers C++14 as well. Though, according to what frob said, I'm not so sure whether they are worth anymore.

It does not has to be him anyway.

 

 

 

For dead-tree books

Dead-tree in what manner? Super bulky book or wasted paper?

 

 

 

The C++ Standard Library by Josuttis

I looked at it now. While I can understand a high price for such a comprehensive book, I'm not so sure whether I should buy it, since it does not cover C++14.

Is that much of a deal breaker? Considering the price of 60$.

 

 

 

And finally, if this is just dabbling and you don't care about waiting another year, the language standard is being finalized for the 2017 major update.

It is true, but until that happens, I would really like to clean my knowledge. It would be just wasted time otherwise.

 

 

 

See if this is of any help https://github.com/isocpp/CppCoreGuidelines/blob/master/CppCoreGuidelines.md

Thanks! Interesting source : )

Edited by Angelic Ice

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Dead-tree in what manner?
"Dead-tree" just means "paper", ie "not electronic" :)

 

Thanks : ) I thought it would carry a special meaning, since the Stroustrup books are also "dead-tree", haha.

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