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    • By Alex Daughters
       

      Hi, I am currently a college student studying to become a Game Developer. I need to interview current game developers for a class I'm taking. if anyone seeing this could answer just the 5 questions that I have provided below as well as your name, current position, and how many years you've been in the game industry. I'd really appreciate any responses. 
       
      Name:
      Position:
      Year in the industry:
       
      What was the starting salary?
      How many hours do you work?
      What did you learn outside of school that was useful?
      How did you get your job and how hard was it to find it?
      how was this job different than you expected it to be?
       
      Thank you for your time.
      -Alex Daughters
    • By RyRyB
      I got into a conversation awhile ago with some fellow game artists and the prospect of signing bonuses got brought up. Out of the group, I was the only one who had negotiated any sort of sign on bonus or payment above and beyond base compensation. My goal with this article and possibly others is to inform and motivate other artists to work on this aspect of their “portfolio” and start treating their career as a business. 
      What is a Sign-On Bonus?
      Quite simply, a sign-on bonus is a sum of money offered to a prospective candidate in order to get them to join. It is quite common in other industries but rarely seen in the games unless it is at the executive level. Unfortunately, conversations centered around artist employment usually stops at base compensation, quite literally leaving money on the table.
      Why Ask for a Sign-On Bonus?
      There are many reasons to ask for a sign-on bonus. In my experience, it has been to compensate for some delta between how much I need vs. how much the company is offering.
      For example, a company has offered a candidate a position paying $50k/year. However, research indicates that the candidate requires $60k/year in order to keep in line with their personal financial requirements and long-term goals. Instead of turning down the offer wholesale, they may ask for a $10k sign on bonus with actionable terms to partially bridge the gap.
      Whatever the reason may be, the ask needs to be reasonable. Would you like a $100k sign-on bonus? Of course! Should you ask for it? Probably not. A sign-on bonus is a tool to reduce risk, not a tool to help you buy a shiny new sports car.
      Aspects to Consider
      Before one goes and asks for a huge sum of money, there are some aspects of sign-on bonus negotiations the candidate needs to keep in mind.
      - The more experience you have, the more leverage you have to negotiate
      - You must have confidence in your role as an employee.
      - You must have done your research. This includes knowing your personal financial goals and how the prospective offer changes, influences or diminishes those goals.
      To the first point, the more experience one has, the better. If the candidate is a junior employee (roughly defined as less than 3 years of industry experience) or looking for their first job in the industry, it is highly unlikely that a company will entertain a conversation about sign-on bonuses. Getting into the industry is highly competitive and there is likely very little motivation for a company to pay a sign-on bonus for one candidate when there a dozens (or hundreds in some cases) of other candidates that will jump at the first offer.
      Additionally, the candidate must have confidence in succeeding at the desired role in the company. They have to know that they can handle the day to day responsibilities as well as any extra demands that may come up during production. The company needs to be convinced of their ability to be a team player and, as a result, is willing to put a little extra money down to hire them. In other words, the candidate needs to reduce the company’s risk in hiring them enough that an extra payment or two is negligible.
      And finally, they must know where they sit financially and where they want to be in the short-, mid-, and long-term. Having this information at hand is essential to the negotiation process.
      The Role Risk Plays in Employment
      The interviewing process is a tricky one for all parties involved and it revolves around the idea of risk. Is this candidate low-risk or high-risk? The risk level depends on a number of factors: portfolio quality, experience, soft skills, etc. Were you late for the interview? Your risk to the company just went up. Did you bring additional portfolio materials that were not online? Your risk just went down and you became more hireable.
      If a candidate has an offer in hand, then the company sees enough potential to get a return on their investment with as little risk as possible. At this point, the company is confident in their ability as an employee (ie. low risk) and they are willing to give them money in return for that ability.
      Asking for the Sign-On Bonus
      So what now? The candidate has gone through the interview process, the company has offered them a position and base compensation. Unfortunately, the offer falls below expectations. Here is where the knowledge and research of the position and personal financial goals comes in. The candidate has to know what their thresholds and limits are. If they ask for $60k/year and the company is offering $50k, how do you ask for the bonus? Once again, it comes down to risk.
      Here is the point to remember: risk is not one-sided. The candidate takes on risk by changing companies as well. The candidate has to leverage the sign-on bonus as a way to reduce risk for both parties.
      Here is the important part:
      A sign-on bonus reduces the company’s risk because they are not commiting to an increased salary and bonus payouts can be staggered and have terms attached to them. The sign-on bonus reduces the candidate’s risk because it bridges the gap between the offered compensation and their personal financial requirements.
      If the sign-on bonus is reasonable and the company has the finances (explained further down below), it is a win-win for both parties and hopefully the beginning a profitable business relationship.
      A Bit about Finances
      First off, I am not a business accountant nor have I managed finances for a business. I am sure that it is much more complicated than my example below and there are a lot of considerations to take into account. In my experience, however, I do know that base compensation (ie. salary) will generally fall into a different line item category on the financial books than a bonus payout. When companies determine how many open spots they have, it is usually done by department with inter-departmental salary caps.
      For a simplified example, an environment department’s total salary cap is $500k/year. They have 9 artists being paid $50k/year, leaving $50k/year remaining for the 10th member of the team. Remember the example I gave earlier asking for $60k/year? The company cannot offer that salary because it breaks the departmental cap. However, since bonuses typically do not affect departmental caps, the company can pull from a different pool of money without increasing their risk by committing to a higher salary.
      Sweetening the Deal
      Coming right out of the gate and asking for an upfront payment might be too aggressive of a play (ie. high risk for the company). One way around this is to attach terms to the bonus. What does this mean? Take the situation above. A candidate has an offer for $50k/year but would like a bit more. If through the course of discussing compensation they get the sense that $10k is too high, they can offer to break up the payments based on terms. For example, a counterpoint to the initial base compensation offer could look like this:
      - $50k/year salary
      - $5k bonus payout #1 after 30 days of successful employment
      - $5k bonus payout #2 after 365 days (or any length of time) of successful employment
      In this example, the candidate is guaranteed $55k/year salary for 2 years. If they factor in a standard 3% cost of living raise, the first 3 years of employment looks like this:
      - Year 0-1 = $55,000 ($50,000 + $5,000 payout #1)
      - Year 1-2 = $56,500 (($50,000 x 1.03%) + $5,000 payout #2)
      - Year 2-3 = $53,045 ($51,500 x 1.03%)
      Now it might not be the $60k/year they had in mind but it is a great compromise to keep both parties comfortable.
      If the Company Says Yes
      Great news! The company said yes! What now? Personally, I always request at least a full 24 hours to crunch the final numbers. In the past, I’ve requested up to a week for full consideration. Even if you know you will say yes, doing due diligence with your finances one last time is always a good practice. Plug the numbers into a spreadsheet, look at your bills and expenses again, and review the whole offer (base compensation, bonus, time off/sick leave, medical/dental/vision, etc.). Discuss the offer with your significant other as well. You will see the offer in a different light when you wake up, so make sure you are not rushing into a situation you will regret.
      If the Company Say No
      If the company says no, then you have a difficult decision to make. Request time to review the offer and crunch the numbers. If it is a lateral move (same position, different company) then you have to ask if the switch is worth it. Only due diligence will offer that insight and you have to give yourself enough time to let those insights arrive. You might find yourself accepting the new position due to other non-financial reasons (which could be a whole separate article!).
      Conclusion/Final Thoughts 
      When it comes to negotiating during the interview process, it is very easy to take what you can get and run. You might fear that in asking for more, you will be disqualifying yourself from the position. Keep in mind that the offer has already been extended to you and a company will not rescind their offer simply because you came back with a counterpoint. Negotiations are expected at this stage and by putting forth a creative compromise, your first impression is that of someone who conducts themselves in a professional manner.
      Also keep in mind that negotiations do not always go well. There are countless factors that influence whether or not someone gets a sign-on bonus. Sometimes it all comes down to being there at the right time at the right place. Just make sure you do your due diligence and be ready when the opportunity presents itself.
      Hope this helps!
    • By menyo
      I have a MongoDB db on a server operated by Kryonet. Obviously I need to be able to query the database from the client for adding, removing, requesting all kind of assets. Now I have written the code to request, add and remove fighters on the Kryonet network I am wondering if there is a better way to do this. I feel it's a bit repetitive, especially when I need to implement this for all other assets the player can own and other players assets when needed. The way I am currently approaching this is the same as my chat/lobby system which works great but I was wondering if anyone could see improvement on my code or a complete different way that is much more scalable perhaps.
       
      public class ClientAssets { public static final int FIGHTER_REQUEST = 1; public static final int FIGHTER_RESPONSE = 2; public static final int FIGHTER_ADD = 3; public static final int FIGHTER_REMOVE = 4; public static void Register(EndPoint endPoint) { Kryo kryo = endPoint.getKryo(); kryo.register(FighterRequest.class); kryo.register(FighterResponse.class); kryo.register(FighterAdd.class); kryo.register(FighterRemove.class); } static public abstract class AssetPacket { public int packetId; public AssetPacket() { } } /** * Packet to request all owned fighters */ public static class FighterRequest extends AssetPacket { public ObjectId playerId; public FighterRequest(ObjectId playerId) { packetId = FIGHTER_REQUEST; this.playerId = playerId; } public FighterRequest() { } } /** * Receiving fighter data from server */ public static class FighterResponse extends AssetPacket { public Fighter fighter; public boolean add; // Add or remove public FighterResponse(Fighter fighter, boolean add) { packetId = FIGHTER_RESPONSE; this.fighter = fighter; this.add = add; } public FighterResponse() { } } /** * Adds a fighter to player assets */ public static class FighterAdd extends AssetPacket { public ObjectId fighterTemplateID; public FighterAdd(ObjectId fighterTemplateID) { packetId = FIGHTER_ADD; this.fighterTemplateID = fighterTemplateID; } public FighterAdd() { } } /** * Removes fighter from assets. */ public static class FighterRemove extends AssetPacket { public ObjectId fighterId; public FighterRemove(ObjectId fighterId) { packetId = FIGHTER_REMOVE; this.fighterId = fighterId; } public FighterRemove() { } } } To elaborate a bit more, this code will communicate between client and server. When receiving a request on the server it will lookup the request in the database. The client will store it for displaying the assets. A specific thing I am unsure about is the FighterResponse.add boolean. I need to be able to remove and add fighters, I guess I am better off with a FighterAddResponse and a FighterRemove response so I will send one boolean less each time this packet is send. But this will create even more repetitive code.
    • By x3ph3r
      A sticky dilemma.
      I'm part of a team based in USA that produces a virtual world software for remote business purposes. The businesses that use us are our Clients with users from all over the world (and expanding), but primarily in the USA. Our software makes use of customizable human avatars to use in world for each user. We have gotten requests from one of our biggest paying Clients and approval from boss to include religion based avatar clothing options (yamulkes, headscarves, skullcaps and turban head coverings currently, potentially garments too).
      As our software is used for business, most people want to keep their real world likeness, which may include some of this clothing because it is a part of their identity. Since this is such a sensitive topic on all sides involved and we are in a politically charged climate in the USA, clearly we don't want to offend anyone because they all pay us. In my opinion, even if this request was deemed as a reason for loss on Client's part, it will still be our company providing the service that will be affected primarily. As an emerging company we can't afford to lose users or current/potential Clients over something unrelated to the core mechanics or hardware requirements of the game.

      How do we put it in the avatar creation menu? Keep it with the other head coverings (so not to upset/offend the religious wear users via segregation) or separate it (to protect from accidental abuse of said garments from ignorant users and offend everybody)? As difficult as it would be for us to do (right now), do we only allow access to certain users? Would that be going too far to request information such as this from users, or for them to have to volunteer it for access?

      How do we talk about it with the client? When the concern was brought up, they warned us to be careful about using the term "religious wear", so we switched to the more broad "cultural wear", in which they again implied even that term might offend in discussion (because Texas users (very many) would get mad about their cowboy hats not being treated as culturally significant...) and client tactfully avoided telling us what they want us to call it themselves. How do we have a productive conversation though they put out a controversial request and are not willing to speak confidently on it's behalf?
       
    • By Kai Keeper
      I finished my game and I'm trying to make a introduction video, I got some feedback from:
      So I created a new one here:
      If you have any suggestions please let me know, thank you. Also I'm thinking about creating another more in depth video that is about 6 minutes, it will explain the space connector mechanics more clearly, which I won't use as the introduction video but will direct people who are interested in the game to it. However, I'm wondering if I should do that or just let the players discover it for themselves in game.
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Is It Really That Nonsensically Impossible To Have A Successful First Game Project?

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Firstly, the newcomer cliché: I don't know if here's the right forum for this subject, which is about an indie team successfully entering the gaming industry with their game, i.e. game development as a business, instead of a hobby. If it's not, please move it to the most proper one.

 

Except where it's misleadingly said that making games is unrealistically easy, almost everywhere it's discouraged and stated firmly and surely that "your first game project will fail". If such statement is targeted to people thinking that making games is as easy as 123, and that such game would yield rivers of money, I completely agree that it has very high chances of failing. But if such statement is targeted to every single first game project, I completely disagree.

If a team isn't just one more utopia believer that attempts to develop yet another FPS and expects to become rich with it, but instead, a team that researches, studies the market to find which genre is flexible, reachable, a genre that they know, that people likes the most, that isn't saturated (the biggest failure-sure example: an MMORPG), and that people won't reject only because there is a big budget game of the genre made by a big budget large company (for example, making a MOBA is sure failure, because of the LoL vs DotA polarization), having in the team no room for "idea guys" but a group of "one man army" that studies deeply about game design, avoid failing on the same failures other developers did, learning a plethora of things from experienced game designers, and the team tries the most of them to not deliver yet another game of X genre, but instead one of the ones, with all of its innovations or differentials.

But then comes someone and says that "your first game will fail". Seriously? Would really a team, with all of the values listed, be defenseless against failure?

Edited by Koas

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Firstly, the newcomer cliché: I don't know if here's the right forum for this subject, which is about
an indie team successfully entering the gaming industry with their game, i.e. game development as a
business, instead of a hobby. If it's not, please move it to the most proper one.

[/quote]

At the very top of the "Game Industry Job Advice" forum are two stickies entitled, respectively, "THIS
FORUM IS NOT FOR QUESTIONS ABOUT STARTUPS" and "THIS FORUM IS NOT FOR BUSINESS QUESTIONS." So, your
topic was not placed in a forum about indie teams entering the game industry (it was placed in a forum
about individuals desiring to be hired for jobs in the game industry). Moved to the Business/Law forum,
accordingly.

[quote}

... where it's misleadingly said that making games is unrealistically easy, almost everywhere it's
discouraged and stated firmly and surely that "your first game project will fail". If such statement is
targeted to people thinking that making games is as easy as 123, and that such game would yield rivers of
money, I completely agree that it has very high chances of failing. But if such statement is targeted to
every single first game project, I completely disagree.

[/quote]

Of course. There is an exception to every statement, including this one you are reading right now. It was
a generalization, and no generalization is ever 100% applicable to every conceivable situation. (There
may be exceptions to this generalization.)

Edit:
Ok, just found out that this really isn't the right forum. Please some moderator move it to the right one
(is it Business & Law?).



Okay, I just saw the edit.
P.S. The quoting is so broken on this forum that I cannot figure out where to fix the above.
THIS IS THE SIXTH TIME I TRIED TO FIX THE QUOTING AND I OFFICIALLY GIVE UP NOW.
Edited by Tom Sloper
quoting is massively broken

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There's a few parts to that adage, "your first game will fail," to unpack. What is meant by "first game?" What is meant by "fail?"

 

I don't really think it is meant to be taken so literally. Certainly many first games (as in first attempt at a commercial business venue based on the sale of a game) will fail (as in not make enough money to turn a profit). Others won't. Others may become runaway success stories. This is generally true of all business ventures. 

 

 

I think that often when somebody makes that assertion they are instead trying to tell you (or whomever) to simply temper their expectations for success and make sure you look at things realistically and with a level head. It's important to be able to do so.

 

As for your scenario... certainly a dream team like that that does all that preparation and research beforehand will be better equipped for success than one who doesn't. But no part of your examples included making games before (it would invalidate the scenario, I guess) and sometimes there is no substitute for experience. Reading about a pitfall and learning about that pitfall from experience are two very different scenarios and give two very different sets of expectations. Pragmatically making successful, profitable games on a reasonable timescale often involves tradeoffs that are hard to do that kind of up-front research about because lots of that up-front research consists of academic thought-experiments in vacuums.

 

So yes, it's possible. But it's important to be realistic.

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I swear I clicked the upvote button and the page scrolled at the same moment, giving a downvote. :-( Upvote to hodgman since the system can't undo.

As above, the odds of a person's first project being a runaway success are so miniscule as to be practically non-existent. While a beginner is learning to write "Hello, World!", commercial successes demand iteration after iteration at removing barriers and improving systems, it is like winning the lottery twice.

There are a small number of cases I can recall (a single-digit number of them) where an individual who was experienced in programming put together something while learning a new system and that something grew into a successful product. That single-digit number across decades contrasts with markets where there are a thousand new entries every day.

And for every one of those thousands of new entries every day, there is an untold number of probably thousands more who started and never completed a project.

Even if you are dedicated, professional, and run everything as a perfect business a commercial failure is still quite probable.

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Well, lets rephrase "your first game will fail!" to "your first project will fail!"...

 

Maybe the first game you finish is highly successfull... but to get there, you most probably killed project after project early after finding out that you were biting off more than you can chew. Happens to all of us, believe me. Some have the insight to kill such projects early. Some finish the project, and move on knowing what they built has only value as a learning expierience. Some will try to release their early projects, and will fail with them most probably in the market.

 

Which brings us to the next point: how do you define failure?

Financial failure? Unless you are a born businessman, have a lot of expierience in the games industry already, or just tons of luck, being successfull from your first try is most probably a pipe dream. You could call that a failure... or not.

Finishing a project? That is easier to achieve, still most people overscope at the beginning... some have the endurance to see through an overscoped project, spending 11 years developing them part time. Most will shelf the project at some point and move on. Again, up to definition if that counts as a failure.

 

I would advise you to look into "The Lean Startup" and their definition of success. In the lean methodology, everything is a success as long as you learn something from it, and apply what you learned to your next project. This of course means not investing much into your projects at first, constantly monitoring them, and killing them early when they fail to meet the milestones. Learn from it, pivot and try again. Your next project will be off to a better start for sure thanks to your new knowledge. Thus you were successfull in the sense of your failed project having increased the chances for future projects to become successfull.

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To add to the different possibilities, you can have several false starts on the same game.

 

My first attempt was a flop financially but I managed to finish a game and learn from my mistakes. I know that the game isn't bad, just average (was told this by members on my team).

 

My second attempt is going slow and steady with building a following and developing the game. Even with hitting the market several times and having a short feedback loop, there is still a chance for it to be a commercial failure because (among other factors) my name is not known in the gaming community right now.

 

It's not impossible to have a successful first game - you can minimise risk by building a community early in development but the probability is never zero.

However, the probability of having a successful first project is about the same as winning the lottery.

Edited by Envy123

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However, the probability of having a successful first project is about the same as winning the lottery.


Not necessarily true. Define success.

Is success millions of dollars profit and the best game since sliced bread or is success any profit at all?

Aim small, invest little and create small games at first so the risk to your business is low. If it even makes a profit after its costs it's then a success so yes, your first game is then a success.

Playing the lottery however you can only weight the game so much by buying more tickets. No comparison!

Smart businessmen plan to succeed. "Failing to plan is planning to fail"...

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However, the probability of having a successful first project is about the same as winning the lottery.


Not necessarily true. Define success.

Is success millions of dollars profit and the best game since sliced bread or is success any profit at all?

Aim small, invest little and create small games at first so the risk to your business is low. If it even makes a profit after its costs it's then a success so yes, your first game is then a success.

Playing the lottery however you can only weight the game so much by buying more tickets. No comparison!

Smart businessmen plan to succeed. "Failing to plan is planning to fail"...

 

 

I mean success as "making a profit taking into account opportunity costs". If we take into account pure accounting profit, then I agree with you. But I like to take into account what wages I forgo when making an indie game.

 

I do admit that the lottery analogy was maybe not the best - I was trying to say that there's always an element of luck involved.

Edited by Envy123

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Well, by "successful" I don't mean to become millionaire (I think that's why you guys are being so skeptical, lol), but instead to just have a normal success, to profit considerably, to sell at least 1000 copies (considering it would cost somewhat $10). If our project sell that much, we would consider it a "success" (it doesn't matter what the industry defines as "success", for us it's different from "failure"), considering that we don't spend more than $10,000 on it. If we do, it would be necessary to earn at least the double of what was spent. If we achieve that, that would be what I call "success".

 

Regarding the obligatoriness of experience, what is experience? History? How much you're known? Knowledge? Such knowledge can't in any way be acquired other than going through it?

 

Regarding programming knowledge, I'm the main developer of the team and have a 1+ year of experience in C#, years in JavaScript (in addition to another member), and several other languages and systems. I know that isn't impressive at all, but if I learned all of these by myself, having Google as best friend, learning game programing won't have any secrets.

 

But one thing I agree: by the fact that we are still unknown, even if it's an astonishingly good game, if few people know about it, it would just fail, even if we publicize it a lot, years of fame can't be compared to the publicizing of a single project.

Edited by Koas

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