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weqn

Problem With Cs:go Sensitivity C++

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(#13comment and #31coment shows the true form /misspelled)
Please Help
Source Engine is C++

Its about m_pitch command, convar is protected cant be changed only if, sv_cheats 1

m_pitch = Mouse pitch factor / vertical
m_yaw = Mouse yaw factor / horizontal

This two commands (m_yaw/m_pitch) have the following values:
 
m_pitch is "0.022000"
m_yaw is "0.022"

The problem is, when change m_pitch from "0.022000" to "0.022", sensitivity* is slightly slower;
the difference is small , but it is crucial

My Question is, if both values are the same, why does this happen?

memory parsing?
floats?
outputs?




*sensitivity

 
Edited by weqn

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0.022000 und 0.022 are not necessarily the same when you express them as IEEE 754 floats. I'm not sure what you mean by "sensibility is more accurate" but you should probably read this (ideally both pages linked there). Edited by BitMaster

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0.022000 und 0.022 are not necessarily the same when you express them as IEEE 754 floats. I'm not sure what you mean by "sensibility is more accurate" but you should probably read this (ideally both pages linked there).

 

I think he meant 'sensitivity' 

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I think he meant 'sensitivity'

 

Keeps the original sentense true, isnt the same. Depending on compiler and hardware accruancy and settings made at compile time (fast float compiling) then this may become a bit unaccurate at the lower end bits. If written 0.0220000 then it may be 0.0220096 or something.

 

If possible grab a debugable version and step into it inspecting the real value at runtime would help

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0.022000 und 0.022 are not necessarily the same when you express them as IEEE 754 floats. I'm not sure what you mean by "sensibility is more accurate" but you should probably read this (ideally both pages linked there).

yes, i meant sensitivity 

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source engine wont go far than 32bits


so,

0.022 + 0.022000 = 0.022000

or,

ex: 0.022 + 0.022000 = 0.0220096

?

Edited by weqn

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I think he meant 'sensitivity'

 

Keeps the original sentense true, isnt the same. Depending on compiler and hardware accruancy and settings made at compile time (fast float compiling) then this may become a bit unaccurate at the lower end bits. If written 0.0220000 then it may be 0.0220096 or something.

 

If possible grab a debugable version and step into it inspecting the real value at runtime would help




"If possible grab a debugable version and step into it inspecting the real value at runtime would help"

 

can you please help me?
i dont know how to do that...

please dont find this offensive...

Edited by weqn

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To prove this, people are saying to

- Hook the CS:GO mouse input (obviously this is possible, since various hacks can spoof mouse inputs)

- Send a specific mouse movement (you can't do this manually or with a physical mouse)
- Record the results with different settings (0.022 and 0.022000) from the same starting point.


How can i do this? i have no idea

 

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can you please help me?
i dont know how to do that...

please dont find this offensive...

 

As reading your start post I assume that you have any source code or source files from Source Engine so you would theoreticaly be able to build it by yourself using a C++ Compiler or Debug it using some C++ debugger (Visual Studio for example on Windows) and set breakpoints inside the source. You provided very few informations here about what you are trying to do, environment and so on so this is the only general advice I have

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can you please help me?
i dont know how to do that...

please dont find this offensive...

 

As reading your start post I assume that you have any source code or source files from Source Engine so you would theoreticaly be able to build it by yourself using a C++ Compiler or Debug it using some C++ debugger (Visual Studio for example on Windows) and set breakpoints inside the source. You provided very few informations here about what you are trying to do, environment and so on so this is the only general advice I have

 

No,
i've read somewhere that some debuggers won't give accurate results when it comes to floats

the only way available in my knowledge is the physical test, this is a bug in CS: GO when it comes to mouse movement, when
m_yaw 0.022 + m_pitch 0.022000
Mouse movement is accurate but somewhat faster than when
m_yaw 0.022 + m_pitch 
0.022

We can not change m_pitch it is a protected command

I have no knowledge of programming or coding , how can I prove that these two coding setups are different in mouse movement ?
I can't, I ask kindly for help in this matter
 
We are talking about e-sports world top bug

 Thanks in advance



 

Edited by weqn

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