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GeneralJist

Perspectives On Mod Makers?

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I'm curious to see the general perspective on what people in the Industry think when it comes to modders.

 

Sure, the best case, dream scenario would be what happened with Long War and Xcom 2 and no doubt if your modding for a specific company's games, that company will likely look favorably on your efforts.

 

But how do other companies view the moddders of another? (In general?)

 

I know Blizzard doesn't seem to care, unless you’re doing it for them. (I was told this directly by one of their recruiters, "Great passion, great experience, but it's not for our community".

 

Do yall think such perspectives common or is this kind in-group behavior rare?

 

Sure there is a wide quality disparity in most modding communities, and of course, changing skins is no match to making entirely new assets. 

 

I guess the question is how much respect do mods of other, (not just rival) products get between companies?

 

Let's assume the mod in question is done right across the board.

 

I guess it all depends on the company culture?....

Edited by GeneralJist

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Many games have become successes because of mods - that's part of what made Halflife a success. People wanting to play mods had to buy the base game.

Team Fortress, CounterStrike, and Day of Defeat came out of the Halflife mod community as well, and Valve hired the teams and made the games into successful full releases.(technically, TeamFortress came out of the Quake community, and Valve hired the team and ported the game to the GoldSrc engine).

 

DotA came out of the Warcraft 3 mod community, boosting sales for Blizzard.

Project Reality and DayZ boosted sales for ARMA 2 after its normal shelf life had already ended.

 

Since mods boosts of sales of their base games, many publishers and studios have noticed, and recognize it as a good thing - sometimes even providing some measure of tool support to help modders.

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I've yet to see a company that dislike mods or modders in a general sense.

Mods mean your game is popular and people are passionate about it.

The exception would be cheat mods and cheaters for competitive games.

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Right,

I'm asking if moders for a company's games are seen as useful to say, a totally different company.

 

For ex.I mod an EA product, and well EA isn't exactly the grateful types....

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Right,
I'm asking if moders for a company's games are seen as useful to say, a totally different company.
 
For ex.I mod an EA product, and well EA isn't exactly the grateful types....


I'm not sure where your opinion comes from. EA generally likes those who mod their games even when they aren't officially sanctioned. But for various legal reasons they don't (as a company) publicly affirm those mods so that they can potentially shut them down and protect their brands. They've got a corporate philosophy of protectionism but that does not mean the teams don't appreciate skill or quality work. This is true of many organizations with fan-created products. As long as you do good work and follow good community rules including staying small, generally it is positive, and everybody is happy.

If you have experience writing mods for a game it looks good on a resume.

If you have experience writing mods for something and you are applying at a totally different company that also makes mods for the game, they'll see that as a bonus.

If you have experience writing mods for something and you are applying for a job at that same company or even that same team for the game you've made mods for, they will almost certainly see that as a bonus, unless the mods were exploits or hacks that deprived them of revenue or harmed the project.

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