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Zeus_

All those little units!

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Remember the units from Starcraft, Age of Empires, etc? How might one go about programming those into a game? I mean, are they quads? models? what?

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quote:
Original post by Zeus_
I mean, are they quads?

Well, are you (basically) displaying a texture?

quote:
Original post by Zeus_
models?

Are you displaying triangles (et cetera)?

quote:
Original post by Zeus_
what?

What do you want to display? There''s lots of answers, none of them are completely incorrect. Since StarCraft as 2D, the units were prerendered (images, textures, pixmaps, whatever you want to call them). You''d normally display them in OpenGL as quads.

[Resist Windows XP''s Invasive Production Activation Technology!]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Age of Empires II used 3D models.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
AOE2 used pre-rendered images of models, not actual 3d models in the game. For some perspective, AOE2 uses prerendered, and Empire Earth uses in-game models.

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Well I thank you for your help so far...

Think of Unreal tournament, and you see the blank models with skins decalled on them, right?

Think of Starcraft, and you see 3d models that were previously made and then just called or something..?

Well anyway, if your wondering what my main goal is, its to program a 3d-style game much like Quake, UT, etc.

Obviously starcraft has nothing to do with those kind of games, but I was just curious.

Also, what is it called when you take a 3d model and paint something onto it? I called it decalling, which is probably wrong. And another thing: Whats the best method of doing it? Cause my last thing that I programmed was just a simple thing where you walk around a 3d village, an Ill use that engine to slap the textures onto stuff...

anyway, thanks!

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I''ve had friends get totally confused with this also.

Sprites created from 3D Objects ----
created by using a modeling package such as 3D Studio Max or Lightwave (or many others). Doing all the modeling for the little people, then rendering each frame of animation to a rasterized image (flat 2D image consisting of pixels).
Examples - AOE/AOE2/Starcraft

3D Objects ----
Also created using 3D modeling software, except these are _not_ rendered (or rasterized, same thing). These are saved AS 3D models, made up of thousands of little triangles, and they are usually accompanied by some 2D textures (skins in this case) which get wrapped around the 3D model in real time, in the game.
Examples - Quake/Unreal Tournament

Good old 2D Sprites ----
These are pretty much self explanitory, these are made using a paint program like photoshop or paint shop pro (or, many others, once again). And saved as flat 2D graphics, then later mapped onto the game screen during gameplay.
Examples - Super Mario Bros.

The thing that can be confusing is you can put 2D sprites in 3D games. For example, you could have 3D terrain and then make flat quads with your 2D sprites mapped onto them, so they always face the viewer and they appear to be 3D, its just an illusion.

Just like the original Wolfenstein, the nazi''s weren''t actually 3D, they were 2D sprites dropped into a 3D world. When you were behind one, it would display the 2D Sprite of the back of a nazi, as opposed to actually rotating the nazi model 180 degrees like in Return the Castle Wolfenstein (the new one) which uses totally 3D stuff.

Oh boy I hope that made sense...

Klowner

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Just like the original Wolfenstein, the nazi''s weren''t actually 3D, they were 2D sprites dropped into a 3D world. When you were behind one, it would display the 2D Sprite of the back of a nazi, as opposed to actually rotating the nazi model 180 degrees like in Return the Castle Wolfenstein (the new one) which uses totally 3D stuff.

Oh boy I hope that made sense...

Klowner



The original wolfenstein wasnt in the least bit 3d. It was using raycasting, which is just pretending to be 3d when its just 2d, and yes, the nazis in wolf were 2d...

mmm... Doom, Doom2, Duke Nukem 3D and the rest of that type of game all used raycasting, with 2d sprites.

hmmm, oh yea, im starting to code Duke Nukem 3d with opengl hardware accelerated rendering... duke with bilinear filtering, heheh....

Oh yea, a qu about sound, is it as easy to filter sound as it is to filter a 2d texture ( i.e. interpolating dukes 22khz sounds into 44khz) and are there any tutorials on doing that (like zsnes''s Bicubic resamplin and all that pish)?

*st0ned*

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quote:
Original post by Hairybudda
The original wolfenstein wasnt in the least bit 3d. It was using raycasting, which is just pretending to be 3d when its just 2d, and yes, the nazis in wolf were 2d...



I know it''s just semantics, but I''d argue this one. Raycasting is a way of rendering a very limited 3d environment (one made of blocks). Sure, it "fakes" 3d, but so does everything else (well, until we get holographic monitors, at least).

The Nazis in Wolf were billboards.

But whatever, we''re getting off topic.


If you want to make AOE/Starcraft/etc, then draw your units using any technique you like (you can render them in a 3d modeling program if you want) from several angles and then draw the appropriate sprite.

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