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ongamex92

Stackoverflow And Money

34 posts in this topic

I searched around a while on job sites ...

The range for "entry level" jobs pays $35,000 - $50,000 .

Experienced ( 5+ years ) .... $60,000 - $85,000 .

Management positions $95,000 - $140,000 .

 

All this depends on where you live, and are willing to travel.

 India is hiring for $400 - $1,200 a month !

 

Way back when I exited school in 1995 in the United States in a region with approximately median cost of living, we had some statistics taken from the student body.  The CS department was the only group where the statistics for employment was "1", as in 100% had jobs or job offers.  The CS department's self-reported wages at graduation were in the $55,000 to $60,000 range fresh from school, unlike the other departments where students were in the $30K, $45K, and similar ranges.

 

The Game Developer Salary Survey has been running strong for many years now.  Here's the 2016 numbers for programmers, with averages for the US:

 

* Game programmer, under 3 years experience: $72,000

* Non-lead, non-senior, non-management game programmer with 6+ years experience, $105,000

 

They have some regional variation (Silicon Valley and NYC are more money) and they don't publicly break down their survey into bigger ranges. Those with 10+ years experience tend to make even more and cross above $120K, and those long-career numbers are on par with what I saw on the stack overflow site.

 

 

There are far too many people in this industry who accept lowball offers. They're often thinking "I don't care how low you pay me, please give me a job in this field."  Of course companies will be glad to hire you if you accept far less than you should be earning.  The company runs a risk that when you discover the wages you will leave, but for them it is cheap labor.

 

Figure out what salary you are worth, figure out how to justify it, and then negotiate well with the company. 

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It's a lot compared to the UK - well, maybe I'm being ripped off (I've only had one full time job, so haven't looked around at rates in years), but the general perception is that the US pays a lot more (and I don't work in finance).

OTOH I'm thankful to have a reasonable amount of holiday, I can't put a price on that. And I'm still paid far more than the median in the UK, so I'm not complaining.

"There are far too many people in this industry who accept lowball offers."

But all the people commenting earning less seem to not be in the US, so statistics about the US are meaningless. It's nothing to do with accepting lowball offers.
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The Game Developer Salary Survey has been running strong for many years now.  Here's the 2016 numbers for programmers, with averages for the US:

 

.

 That site's numbers are not matching what I am finding with job postings ... maybe they are pulling figures from high paying areas, or 'future projected pay' statistics  ?

 I spent more time rummaging around many different employment websites ... the newest 120 listings for "entry level" came back under $48,000 .

 

Could you post a real job listing for "entry level programmer" at $72,000? I am unable to find anything legitimate.

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 I spent more time rummaging around many different employment websites ... the newest 120 listings for "entry level" came back under $48,000 .

 

If they need to advertise like that for an entry level game developer they're probably not a great place to work at.  All my recent employers have had enough of a steady stream of applicants to keep the jobs filled with quality workers.

 

The actual pay always depends on the negotiation, but our fresh graduates (in Austin) earn around $60K and get a moderate raise at the end of the first year. Before that, at my prior employer (in Salt Lake City) our part time CS students generally started at least $20/hr (equivalent to $40K annually if it were full time) with a large increase to around $60K upon graduation and joining us full time.

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Holy shit...I'm living in Spain and my salary is 25K(one year of experience as a :NET web developer), the worst is that this is a a good salary for a webdeveloper in spain...

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Holy shit...I'm living in Spain and my salary is 25K(one year of experience as a :NET web developer), the worst is that this is a a good salary for a webdeveloper in spain...

 

The real salary you earn also depends on the value of your currency, quality of life in your country, country-wide inflationary/deflationary pressures,  local region expensiveness/inexpensiveness Vs taxation and generally purchasing power of your country (and including as mentioned in previous post various benefits from your company) 

 

For example UK is a comparatively medium salary, high taxation country, but in return we enjoy free health care (NHS), fairly good public transportation, and relative low inflationary pressures. But then there is also huge regional differences- London and South east for instance is very expensive while as you go northwards it gets relatively cheaper.

 

So depending on all of the above your 25K could be equivalent to say 60k in the US (or may be equivalent to 15K :()

 

Independent of where I live I believe my skills and creativity would self-sell me to the appropriate level at the right time, but even in the worst case scenario that it doesn't - its not worth getting stressed about it, you would only work yourself up, age quicker and get more devalued   :wub:

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Here is an article on salary bands at major companies: https://blog.step.com/2016/04/08/an-open-source-project-for-tech-salaries/

 

Holy shit...I'm living in Spain and my salary is 25K(one year of experience as a :NET web developer), the worst is that this is a a good salary for a webdeveloper in spain...

 

"Web developer" is not on that chart.   At least, not what most people call a web developer.

 

The lowest tier on that chart requires a 4-year degree and is doing actual software engineering tasks.  They are technical work at major tech companies.  It is a professional career track, the type of job that up until last decade required going to the office in a business suit.

 

Most of the time a "web developer" is not those things. A web developer spends their days hooking up some data to forms or building pages in drupal or wordpress or similar. No serious database work, no serious programming work, skills you can pick up with a one-week seminar plus searching the web.  

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$200k for a god tier engineering manager in San Francisco seems kind of low to me.  Really low for Silicon Valley.  I hear our server admin talking about his friends getting jobs in the area with a lot less experience and getting $150k+.

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Holy shit...I'm living in Spain and my salary is 25K(one year of experience as a :NET web developer), the worst is that this is a a good salary for a webdeveloper in spain...

 

The real salary you earn also depends on the value of your currency, quality of life in your country, country-wide inflationary/deflationary pressures,  local region expensiveness/inexpensiveness Vs taxation and generally purchasing power of your country (and including as mentioned in previous post various benefits from your company) 

 

For example UK is a comparatively medium salary, high taxation country, but in return we enjoy free health care (NHS), fairly good public transportation, and relative low inflationary pressures. But then there is also huge regional differences- London and South east for instance is very expensive while as you go northwards it gets relatively cheaper.

 

So depending on all of the above your 25K could be equivalent to say 60k in the US (or may be equivalent to 15K :()

 

Independent of where I live I believe my skills and creativity would self-sell me to the appropriate level at the right time, but even in the worst case scenario that it doesn't - its not worth getting stressed about it, you would only work yourself up, age quicker and get more devalued   :wub:

 

 

Yes I know, that's why in my post said that 25K is a 'good' salary in spain for an IT engineer(mine was a 5-year career,  I think it's equivalent to a degree + master in europe, at least for other engineerings, computer science was always the black sheep of enginering in Spain so...who really knows,) with one year of experience. For now we have free health care, but spanish politians are trying really hard to fuck it with their budget reductions, and for taxes, well, I think Spain is one of the countries with more taxes, and living in Barcelona is not cheap.

 

@Frob, I was talking about the first post, not the graph which I didn't even see  :( . Btw, some tech companies still required to come to work with a suit, like Everis, mine too, but it's because I'm working for a prestigious law firm and..well, you know...lawyers with a 'classical' mind (sorry, I don't know a more appropiate term for this in english).

 

Well, at the end I was just surprised about the salaries in other countries, even if I already knew that are much higuer than in Spain.

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