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glober

Good C++ Learning Materials For A Beginner

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Hi guys,

I'm planning on learning C++ soon so that I could eventually start learning about Graphics Programming down the road. But,
a lot of the book recommendations and materials I've found on the forum seem rather outdated, so I was wondering if anyon could recommend some good books or resources for learning C++ as a beginner that's perhaps a bit more up to date? Something that's suitable for someone new?

While I do have some experience with Python, I'm however still not a very experienced programmer and completely new to the C family of languages.

 

In addition, I have looked at stackoverflow's definitive book list for C++ and have browsed this forum a bit as well, but the opinions on them seem varied from person to person.

 

Does anyone have a book they would recommend by any chance? And I do like that there's so many tutorials on this forum, but which one would you guys recommend?

Edited by glober

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This is good if you already know how to program a bit http://www.stroustrup.com/Tour.html , its failry up to date as it mostly covers C++11. However C++ is a moving target nowadays as we have C++14 and C++17 is coming really soon too.

 

Effective Modern C++ is also a good book to read when you know how to use C++ because it will only cover C++11 and C++14 features that you need to know about.

 

Effective C++ and More Effective C++ are also good, although old now but the information in the books is still relevant.

 

If you are coming from Python you are going to hate C++ because you have to do everything yourself, from memory management to utility classes that Python has libs for, I am not saying this to discourage you just to warn you.

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This the book that I used in my C++ class last semester: https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Problem-Analysis-Program-Design/dp/1285852745/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1471021377&sr=8-1&keywords=c+from+problem+analysis

 

That class was my first introduction to C++ and I found the book helpful.  It is pricey for the physical copy, but it looks like you can get the etextbook for about $10.

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If you are coding on Windows, the Intro to C on Windows from Handmade Hero will teach you all the stuff you need to know that the books don't teach you.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3ntGDm6hOs&list=PLEMXAbCVnmY6RverunClc_DMLNDd3ASRp

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I have looked at stackoverflow's definitive book list for C++ and have browsed this forum a bit as well, but the opinions on them seem varied from person to person.   Does anyone have a book they would recommend by any chance?

 

It is going to continue to vary by person.

 

My c++ book recommendation list, which includes the reasons for each recommendation.

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This the book that I used in my C++ class last semester: https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Problem-Analysis-Program-Design/dp/1285852745/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1471021377&sr=8-1&keywords=c+from+problem+analysis

 

That class was my first introduction to C++ and I found the book helpful.  It is pricey for the physical copy, but it looks like you can get the etextbook for about $10.

Over the years I have received the same advice:

  • Avoid books with "for DUMMIES" in the title.
  • Avoid books that claim to teach you anything in 10 minutes, 24 hours, or 21 days.
  • Avoid all books written by Herbet Schildt.
  • Avoid all books written by D.S. Malik
  • Avoid C++ Primer Plus

The best books I would recommend is C++ Primer or Programming Principles and Practices Using C++, tutorials at cplusplus.com, to get The C++ Programming Language purely as a reference book. 

Edited by BHXSpecter

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This the book that I used in my C++ class last semester: https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Problem-Analysis-Program-Design/dp/1285852745/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1471021377&sr=8-1&keywords=c+from+problem+analysis

 

That class was my first introduction to C++ and I found the book helpful.  It is pricey for the physical copy, but it looks like you can get the etextbook for about $10.

Over the years I have received the same advice:

  • Avoid books with "for DUMMIES" in the title.
  • Avoid books that claim to teach you anything in 10 minutes, 24 hours, or 21 days.
  • Avoid all books written by Herbet Schildt.
  • Avoid all books written by D.S. Malik
  • Avoid C++ Primer Plus

The best books I would recommend is C++ Primer or Programming Principles and Practices Using C++, tutorials at cplusplus.com, to get The C++ Programming Language purely as a reference book. 

 

 

Thank you for the suggestions, I'll have to check them out.  Now that I'm trying to learn the more advanced C++ topics (like the syntax for drawing to the screen, classes, etc) I'm seeing how unhelpful the book is.  It's a shame I have to use it for this coming semester too.

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I'm seeing how unhelpful the book is.  It's a shame I have to use it for this coming semester too.

 

That's actually a good thing.  The more you code and books you are exposed to the more you can learn.  As you gain experience you'll see some patterns that work well and some that are poor or ineffective, these days they are called anti-patterns.

 

Learn from as many sources as you can.  

 

The biggest benefit of academic studies is that it forces you to be exposed to ideas you may not normally want to study, yet it only gives the shallowest exposure to the topics. You should do as much learning as you are able on your own. 

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I'm seeing how unhelpful the book is.  It's a shame I have to use it for this coming semester too.

 

That's actually a good thing.  The more you code and books you are exposed to the more you can learn.  As you gain experience you'll see some patterns that work well and some that are poor or ineffective, these days they are called anti-patterns.

 

Learn from as many sources as you can.  

 

The biggest benefit of academic studies is that it forces you to be exposed to ideas you may not normally want to study, yet it only gives the shallowest exposure to the topics. You should do as much learning as you are able on your own. 

 

 

I absolutely agree.  From the experiences I've already had I'm glad I'm learning game dev on my own by utilizing this forum and the resources I've found listed here instead of going through my university.

 

I've everyone here to be very helpful so far and am compiling a list of things to research once I hit the point where I'm ready to tackle them. 

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