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How long would it take to get good at game art?

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I would assume you must first be skilled at drawing before moving on to modeling and animation. Unfortunately, my art sucks. I attached a file showing how bad it is. I can see the world I have created in my head clear as day but I can't put it on paper. I assume I need technical knowledge on drawing, such as anatomy. I can only imagine how naive I seem in regards to the subject. 

 

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I am not really an artist, but to get good at anything you must practice. I am a professional Software Engineer but when I first started programming (over 16 years ago) I was not very good at it. I have improved considerably in programming from when I started, but I still learn new things about programming on a regular basis!

 

Your current drawing abilities do not seem that bad as a starting point. If you put in the time and practice your drawing you will improve.

 

I really like the site http://cgcookie.com/ for learning about game art. They have courses on Blender, Unity, traditional drawing, etc.

 

Also modeling and animation are really different skills from drawing. Having the ability to draw helps, but there are a wide variety of skills involved with creating 3d graphics. Generally concept arts create artwork that is passed off to the modelers, and then the modelers create models that are passed on to the people doing the rigs/animations. Some people have multiple roles and sometimes they are broken up into specializations.

Edited by shadowisadog

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You got to keep practicing. Keep drawing.
Be curious on your drawing mistakes (read some drawing technique books so you can try out something you haven't tried before).
Take criticism (preferably from people you respect; mentor, friends who draw better or trying to be better like you [make an artist circle!]) so you can tell that there's something wrong with your drawing that you couldn't see.

There really is no other way I think.

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I would assume you must first be skilled at drawing before moving on to modeling and animation.

Any of the visual arts will help improve the others, this is because it improves your artistic eye. However each visual arts skill stands on it's own, so it uses techniques that the otter skills don't. As an example to learn drawing you need to learn how to hold your pencil or pen and for 3D modeling you need to learn your shortcuts.

 

Any one of the visual arts takes years to learn, you are considered a beginner when you finished school on your art or spend 3-4 years learning.

 

3D animation and 3D modeling isn't the same thing.

As a 3D modeler I spend a lot of time with animators and they know only the basics of 3d modeling, they will say the reverse for me.

As a 3D modeler clients expect me to also know animations, I am learning animations and am not even considered to be a beginner after two years of learning.

 

2D animation and 3D animation, isn't the same thing in the way that painting and digital painting isn't the same thing. Basically a person from one can easily learn the other, they only need to learn the technique.

 

All visual arts follow a similar principal of refinement, that is you start with a rough drawing and improve on it until you are happy with it.

The more you work with art the more you will notice what shapes and form objects are made from.

The principals of art apply to 2D and 3D, traditional and digital so any thing you can learn about any art is useful.

 

 

When some one says you need to know how to draw something to model it, they mean you need to know how to model something to draw it.

 

In other words you need to understand all shapes and forms and as much as possible about the object, so that you can remake it in your art form. There is no need to learn to draw if you want to make a 3D model.

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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Actually, you're doing pretty good in your isometric. But I can see that you don't understand the principles of Perspective very well.

I can actually recommend you to a number of items that I am using to teach myself to draw.

"Figure Drawing For All it's Worth" by Andrew Lumis.

This does a good job at teaching you how to draw the human body in oblique, and then in perspective. A VERY good job in fact, even posing and anatomy. The best part that you'll need to understand is that the Human anatomy is very similar to virtually all aniamls. You just need to modify a few structures.

For instance, a cat has all the bones of a human, and these tend to take the same general shape. The difference is that a Cat's shoulder is pointing in the direction of the sternum, and the hip bone is better aligned for it's movement. It's hind legs bones are very similar to a human, it just walks on it's toes. And so are it's fore legs.

A horse is similar to a cat, with the difference that it's fore legs have it's "fore arm bones" fused together, so they don't twist like ours do.

When you are done... start drawing a LOT of shit from life. And I mean a lot. Sketch them in ten second sessions. Sketch them fully to complete detail. Draw everything!

There's a reason why you're told this. Part of it is practice. Part of it developes your eye, and muscle memory. But the biggest part of it is that you start developing a shape library which you can use to draw from memory and imagination.

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There are many tricks and technologies to drawing, modeling and animating, and you need to follow some kind of course structure to learn them.

The art that you admire was made by people that studied their craft full time.

 

I see nothing wrong with your sketches except the lack of the application of those tricks and technologies, like, for example, construction drawing:

- http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com.br/2016/08/three-steps-in-blocking-hand.html

- http://lackadaisy.foxprints.com/exhibit.php?exhibitid=356

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What was it - 10'000 hours of practice to get good at something? Or was it just 1'000 hours?

 

Anyway, practice, practice, and then practice some more. If you practice your drawing 1 hour every day for example, and keep that routine up for some years, you will certainly see a massive improvement year to year.

 

If you cannot put up with such a rigid regime, you might go to some hour per week, but you will of course slow down your progress.

 

 

I would put it like this: the fact you are not already good at art just means you do not have enough of an urge to draw to really get good at it. Which is not such a problem, maybe you only discovered recently how fun drawing is.

But that is front and center to getting good at anything: if you love doing it, you will do it more often. Thus you will gain more expierience, which in turn will make you better at it, which in turn will make you enjoy it even more.

 

 

EDIT: Of course, studying the right techniques and tricks is also important. But ONLY if you are constantly trying to use what you learned in practice. Many try to get better by reading books and theorycrafting. Without the massive amount of practical expierience by just doing things, AND trying out new tricks, this will all be for nought.

 

 

There is no real talent involved with great artists. Some might start at a different level because they have a firmer grasp on some things (maybe because of thing they learned as small kids, IDK)... most of them just started drawing at a young age and never stopped drawing while other kids where busy doing other things. Thus they reach adulthood with some "magical talent" that came from constant practice.

 

My personal regime is: If you suck at something, and want to get better at it, just force yourself to create a quick doodle every day. I suck at drawing faces while I am pretty decent at drawing characters otherwise. So I set myself a goal to paint/draw a face every day for a year, and see if I can get a firmer grasp on how to draw faces in that time.

I'd like to be able to paint a fully shaded, good looking face in about an hour. Lets see if a year of practice is enough to get to that level of skill.

Edited by Gian-Reto

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The big thing you need right now is not technical, but perceptual - you are still drawing primarily at the iconographic level. Which is to say, when you try to draw something, what you're drawing is an iconographic shorthand form based on what you consciously know about the object, and not the object as it exists - the biggest hallmark of this type of drawing is living creatures drawn exclusively in profile or head on.

 

The way to progress is to spend time drawing in ways specifically designed to make you pay attention to the actual forms you are seeing, and not just what they represent, such as blind contour drawing and upside-down drawing. The most-often recommended book for this, as far as I know, is Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain.

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drawing in ways specifically designed to make you pay attention to the actual forms you are seeing, and not just what they represent, such as (...) upside-down drawing.

I wanted to say thanks for this tip.
I'm used to flipping the canvas horizontally as it helps to spot errors -- to some extent. But even using this I was having some trouble sketching foreshortened forms.

Rotating the canvas view to unusual angles (upside-down, as mentioned) makes you stop worrying about what the object is, and worry about the forms of that object. Sketching the foreshortened object with an upside-down canvas helped solve the problem, and I'm going to recommend this to other people as well.

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