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Assembly under Windows XP, 2000, NT?

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Hi peeps, Just bought a book not too long ago entitled Assembly Language Step-by-Step, 2nd Edition by Jeff Duntemann. In it, he states that Assembly is coded under DOS. With OSes like XP, 2000, and NT, is there a way to create an Assembly program under those OSes? "I Vanna Fryyyy Skyyyy Hiiiiiiigh! Vroooll to get Vyyy!" -Sega''''s "Daytona USA"

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Yes, it is possible to program ASM in Win2k, XP, etc. (think about it- all C++ gets turned into machine code before it is able to be run), but you would be pretty crazy to, especially something that uses heaps of windows components.

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So the best answer is just to use DOS?
The reason why I am asking is because I want to get involved into learning how to make Gameboy Advance games. C is used, but Assembly is the industry standard for coding GBA games, which is understandable, since you need fast code to cram into that small package.



"I Vanna Fryyyy Skyyyy Hiiiiiiigh! Vroooll to get Vyyy!" -Sega''''s "Daytona USA"

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Guest Anonymous Poster
ehm, there''s another reason why it could be a good decision to use assembly when programming for GBA.
Every GBA ( nearly every ) has the same hardware.
So they can use every hardware feature directly in assembly
( there you can use every feature cause you''re mainly writing
instructions for the processor, and don''t have to wait for support ) and don''t have to worry that the code wouldn''t run on a particular machine.

You can do every thing in assembly what you could do in a HLL
( actually you can do everything in hardware if you wanted to,
but that wouldn''t be very flexible, but fast if done right ).
Also windows programming could be done in assembly and with the right include files and a few macros it isn''t too painful at all.
But DOS is a good place to start first, ''cause you haven''t to bother with so many things at first time.

But don''t think programs written in assembly would be fast because it they were written in assembly.
Michael Abrash wrote something like assembly has a very big potential for writing slow code ( sorry for the bad english ) in
one of his books and that''s TRUE.

So just think about it.
Hope this helped you a little!

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quote:
Original post by Gamersez
...but Assembly is the industry standard for coding GBA games.

You do realize that assembly language differs per-hardware platform? Even AT&T syntax, used as an abstraction layer in GAS, still has to reflect issues like how many registers the hardware possesses, thier bitsize and so forth. Learning PC assembly - whether Intel or AT&T syntax - doesn''t necessarily give you any significant advantage. I''d advise looking into one of the GBA emulators and trying to write assembly for it. The only link I have off the top of the head is GBADev.

Good luck.

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Oluseyi, thanks for the link!

So Assembly can be slow as well...hmm......interesting. I hate not knowing this! I feel like a tourist rather than a programmer!

Thanks to all for participating! This has to be one of the most active forums I''ve ever bothered being involved with.

"I Vanna Fryyyy Skyyyy Hiiiiiiigh! Vroooll to get Vyyy!" -Sega''''s "Daytona USA"

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