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Visual Studio C++ without debugging screen fades.

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Okay I have finally started working on my project again and I am having problems with debugging / not debugging.

 

When I debug and change the resolution of the game I get a proper break at the breakpoint

 

When I open a text box (without breakpoints) to see the interaction in the game window and I am in debug mode the current situation is resolved.

 

 

However, when I am not debugging and just running without debug and I do either of these two actions the screen fades out and displays "is not responding."

 

How do I fix this situation so that the program works like it does in debug mode?

 

 

Thank You,

 

JoshuaE

Edited by Josheir

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Thanks for the help Nypyren.

 

 I guess window acts like window and full screen should act like full screen.  I changed the cooperative level and I am very pleased with the results.   A real good day!

 

This attach process idea works well if in a while loop for example, what are its other uses?  Seeing that on Win10, Visual Studio C++ the 'pause' button becomes useable after attach process->Attach.

 

Thanks for your help,

JoshuaE

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This attach process idea works well if in a while loop for example, what are its other uses?


A few other cases where I've used attach-to-process:

- When my program starts child processes, I attach the debugger to all of the child processes as well. (I wish visual studio could do this automatically.) The only game examples I can think of where you would start a child process would be when a game client launches its own dedicated server instead of hosting it in-process.

- When a program crashes but I forgot to attach the debugger, sometimes the crash dialog will suspend the program and I can attach at that time to see where the crash is. (As far as I know this is something special that Visual Studio installs.)

- Debugging programs I don't have source code for (using the disassembly window).

- Attaching to a process on a different computer (usually for debugging the program on a Windows RT tablet). Edited by Nypyren

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