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the very best resources I found for game programming

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I received an email from the game industry, they sent me a email first asking me to "ask them anything" about the industry...and of course I gave them my question...

 

here is my email:

 

 


Greetings

I am really honored to recieve this email from you!!

I love peogramming, I know the basics now of C++ and Java, and I created a Pong game with C++ from the help of a tutorial video on YouTube.

weeks ago, I read an article about
Gameplay peogrammer and graphics programmer, And I decided to go with gameplay programmer.

But I have a problem, I can't go beyong basics in programming. I do not have ideas of what to code next, I still don't have the ability to create my own code (program) by myself. I have to follow tutorials, when I try to code by myself I dont do that good.

So my question is, what is the programming best practice??

I hope you answer and thank you.

and their reply:

 

 

 

Hi there, I'm glad that you wrote me. Programming can be difficult to learn at first, it takes a lot of practice. So don't get frustrated, keep following tutorials and keep writing small programs, and you will improve over time.

Here are a few articles that you might find helpful:

 

http://www.gameindustrycareerguide.com/how-to-become-a-video-game-programmer/

http://www.gameindustrycareerguide.com/computer-science-degree-for-video-game-career/

http://www.gameindustrycareerguide.com/what-should-i-put-into-my-video-game-programming-portfolio/

http://www.gameindustrycareerguide.com/the-very-best-game-programming-books/

 

I wish you the best of luck with your future career!

Jason

 

 

FINALLY, I got the ultimate resources from the industry itself telling me what to do for the future, so I don't need to ask anyone what to learn...because it always end with the same answer "learn Python"...

 

and these books:

http://www.gameindustrycareerguide.com/the-very-best-game-programming-books/

 

teach you C++ and Game Programming at the same time, even if you have no idea about C++.

plus they have categories (beginner, intermediate and advanced books)

 

So go on there and start learning!

 

 

Extra resource:

http://askagamedev.tumblr.com/

 

this tumbler resource is very helpful for you, you can ask a game developer anything related to game development!

 

His quote: I make games for a living and can answer your questions.

 

 

HAPPY GAME CODING!!

Edited by Sora Keyheart

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Well...If they don't like coding, let them focus on something else, aka animation, design, music, storytelling, etc.

 

And about C++, in the end, the industry's main language is C++, nothing else. (it's already known), yes yes..I know minecraft is made with Java or something, but still the main is C++

 

Me personally, I like to learn the hard way, that's why I right away start with C++ and Java.

 

What I've seen and heard from a lot of Computer Science major in big universities is they start with Java, C++, or any other "hard" modern languages, even if the student has no background in programming. If he/she wants to learn, he/she will learn.

 

So people recommending languages while they are "Still learning" isn't a good way to take advices....right?

 

and no matter what road you take, either start with Python, Swift, Java, Javascript, whatever satisfy you...your final destination is C++ (If you want to be a pro game programmer.)

 

In the end...All modern programming language walk on the same road: Object-Oriented programming, which means (Same logic), the only difference is typing the code.

 

Speaking of "Pro", one can't call himself professional if he only knows one language, try and know at least 3

 

and most programmers recommend C++, Java, and Python. (So I would learn python either way).

Edited by Sora Keyheart

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But I have a problem, I can't go beyong basics in programming. I do not have ideas of what to code next, I still don't have the ability to create my own code (program) by myself. I have to follow tutorials, when I try to code by myself I dont do that good.
So my question is, what is the programming best practice??


Stop focusing on learning. Start focusing on achieving. You need to set yourself a specific goal, then learn just what you need to accomplish that goal.

Don't worry about how much you "know" or have "learned" or if you feel like an "expert". All of that is worth absolutely nothing if you can't produce an end result.

Once you have accomplished your goal or you get bored and want to move on, consider a new goal that stretches what you already know a bit further, but not so far further that it destroys your motivation.

I've been at this lark for over a quarter of a century now and I'm learning every day. Edited by Aardvajk

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But I have a problem, I can't go beyong basics in programming. I do not have ideas of what to code next, I still don't have the ability to create my own code (program) by myself. I have to follow tutorials, when I try to code by myself I dont do that good.
So my question is, what is the programming best practice??


Stop focusing on learning. Start focusing on achieving. You need to set yourself a specific goal, then learn just what you need to accomplish that goal.

Don't worry about how much you "know" or have "learned" or if you feel like an "expert". All of that is worth absolutely nothing if you can't produce an end result.

 

 

This is exactly the advice you need. Pick a simple goal you would like to achieve, probably a simple game - something like Pong is a classic. Start creating it, learning and looking things up as you go to overcome obstacles towards that specific game. Rinse and repeat.

 

Also, don't worry about using tutorials. Even professional programmers tend to build a lot of their work inside the shells of modified tutorials, if that serves the purpose...

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Also keep in mind that we've all been there (I mean at the start where you get a bazilion different opinions). So just pick something a start learning. it seems like a big deal now, but your 1st language isn't that important, when gain a bit of experience you will learn new languages pretty fast, and you will be able to understand different APIs(for the same thing) super fast.

 

Doing something is always better than doing nothing.

Just do not learn in isolation. Ask questions when you need to.

 

if you like python go Python, if you like Swift go with Swift ect..
In my case my 1st language was Javascript, after 3 months I've switched to C++. Now at work 95% of the code I write is in C++, but I also write code in Python, C#, Php, and other small languages. I write both code for D3D, GL and other APIs.

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Well...If they don't like coding, let them focus on something else, aka animation, design, music, storytelling, etc.

If everyone ran from what they didn't like no games will ever get made.

 

Even if you love programming and enjoy puzzle solving, when you do programming for a living there is going to be a point where you will come to hate it; if only briefly.

What will you do at this point, abandon your dreams just because you don't like programming?

 

What about the Indie developers who dream of making there own games, yet they hate programming and can't afford to hire a programmer, should they give up?

 

And about C++, in the end, the industry's main language is C++, nothing else. (it's already known), yes yes..I know minecraft is made with Java or something, but still the main is C++

Yes, it maybe a industry standard however if you believe it's the only language used by the industry you are wrong, it isn't even uncommon for software to use third party plugins made to understand a different language.

 

C++ is the industry standard because of it's flexibility and availability. If C++ was perfect then there would have been no other languages would exist.

 

Me personally, I like to learn the hard way, that's why I right away start with C++ and Java.

Good for you, the more you are willing to suffer the further you will get.

Just don't do those annoying "Learn C++ the hard way." courses, they are difficult not because they do every thing in detail, instead they are difficult because it's a poorly designed course.

 

What I've seen and heard from a lot of Computer Science major in big universities is they start with Java, C++, or any other "hard" modern languages, even if the student has no background in programming. If he/she wants to learn, he/she will learn.

Yes that is because they care about results, they couldn't care less if the students actually learned any thing. A University is happy to cull the weakest students, it has very little to do with the quality of the language used.

 

So people recommending languages while they are "Still learning" isn't a good way to take advices....right?

Same as asking any one. A lot of luck and skill is involved, why a person is successful often happens to be because they knew the right people and had the relevant skills; it doesn't mean their advice is worth more than a students.

 

Don't ask advice and ignore it, good advice can be found anywhere.

 

and no matter what road you take, either start with Python, Swift, Java, Javascript, whatever satisfy you...your final destination is C++ (If you want to be a pro game programmer.)

False, no language leads to a other because there is no language so perfect that it can do any thing quick and easy.

 

Besides if there was one language to rule them all wouldn't it be C, it's the parent language of  C++, Python, D, Go, Rust, Java, JavaScript, Limbo, LPC, C# and many others.

 

 

Speaking of "Pro", one can't call himself professional if he only knows one language, try and know at least 3

I know eight and believe me I am no "Pro". My coding skills is so bad that by the time I hire a programmer to help with my game, they use my code as reference and start from scratch.

 

It isn't how many languages you can use but how well you can use them.

Edited by Scouting Ninja

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