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ArchitectMo

Designing everything then Program it later - is this a good plan?

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Hi im new to game development but not new to 3d graphics,  animating..  Etc

 

Would this plan work? 

 

Basically i want to create kind of 3rd person fighting game. 

 

Would it work if i ignored the programming part at first and created every single 3d model,  texture,  logo etc (every visual thing)  where all i have to do left is like 

 

Ok (making this by programming / unreal engine blue prints)  let this be my main character,  and let those be the ai enemy,  and let this be the weapon i have to pick up

 

Etc. 

Edited by ArchitectMo

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Not really. Design the large-scale things, then start implementing as you go.

 

If you try designing everything to the smallest detail, it's very likely you'll encounter something when you code it up that makes you go "Huh, this didn't really work at all as I had thought. I'll need to change this and everything related to it".

 

Have a plan, then create small tasks (say 1-2 weeks of work), then implement as much as you can. After the task is done, look at where you are and create new tasks. Repeat until done.

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Games are never made that way. It's an iterative process.

How do you even know what final art you want if you haven't tested your core mechanics and verified which actions you find fun? It's literally impossible to make all your assets up front without a finished design, and it's impossible to make a finished design without playtesting, and it's impossible to playtest without working code. And it's impossible to finish code without a finished design, or to determine the limits of the design or code imposed by art, etc.

You have to work in iterations of minimally-viable stages. e.g. you know for phase 1 that you need the core fighting mechanics working in an engine, you need to know what those core mechanics should be, and you need some test art to see what you're doing. Then you can playtest, make sure you like the core loop. Then improve the code with the next phase of features (combos, or whatever), design those features, and implement art to visualize them and UI. etc.

There's a reason why "real" games are made by dozens or hundreds (sometimes over a thousand) people over the course of several years.

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There's a reason why "real" games are made by dozens or hundreds (sometimes over a thousand) people over the course of several years.

And it's the same reason that some games just aren't that good/fun.

 

It's not that the game wasn't meant to be bad, it's just not as easy as writing "and here there's going to be an awesome battle with a dragon capable of destroying villages with its awesome fiery breath".

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Thanks for your explanations

Do you guys have a link with an explanation of the stages i have to go through

Like the correct steps organization so i don't fall into errors or problems?

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