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GeneralJist

portfolio link on Resume?

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1. So, usually I put it on, but I recently talked to an HR professional who's been in HR (not games but general HR) for at least 10 years.

 

He said to take hyperlinks out of my resume, since most links and hyperlinks aren't looked at.

Since resumes are usually printed, copied and copied over and over, after  Applicant tracking system (ATS), it won't be seen, nor do they have the time to look in the 1st place.

 

Wondering how true that is in the industry, and if I'm applying for other industries, would it be good or not to have my games portfolio/ current project link on my resume?

 

my current solution is just to have my public linkedin on the top, so if they want to see it, and other stuff, they can.

 

He basically told me it was overkill and too much information, to have hyperlinks on resumes, want to leave employers hungry for more, and give it if they ask.

 

2. He also said to bring in samples of work, which I do. Printed out and all.

 

But all my stuff is best electronic. (and in some cases too much of a hassle to print hard copies)

 

How appropriate is it to just bring up your portfolio on a phone, or give them the link for  them to view on the computer? or even a USB?

 

I've never heard of anyone doing that.

 

When I review applications for my project, I expect digital links and samples of work, but then again we;re in games, and all work remotely.

(on the other hand, I'm in Houston TX right now, and people are super backword on tech (from what I've seen)

It's weird, they use tech in their churches fine, but other places not so much.)

 

I'm going back to the bay area tho, so maybe I'll just leave it on?

 

Most of the time interviews don't take place in rooms with computers for use, nor do people want to spend precious interview time looking at a digital you, when your meant to be right there selling yourself.

Edited by GeneralJist

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Partly disagree with your person.  It depends on the company. Generally the documents you send in for your resume are kept as documents that are shared, but are printed at the final steps.

 

 

Some people will not look at your links, that is true.  But some people who interview you WILL click on those links if you are a promising candidate.  They will look at your pages and see what you have created.  If it looks amazing they'll make note of it.  If it looks mediocre they'll still make notes that you have passion.  If it looks absolutely terrible they may note that as well.

 

Since sometimes they'll be printed out, make sure you include the actual address if reasonable.

 

Use either a shortened link or your own website if possible.  Generally as a tech field your own domain name is quite common, but if you're using something like a subdomain wordpress site you'll want to shorten it.  Such as:

 

Project Foo  (http://bit.ly/whatever)

 

or:

 

Project Bar (http://GeneralJist.com/ProjectBar/)

 

where the links are clickable hyperlinks on your PDF document that you send.

 

 

These days keeping everything electronic is fine.  If you get to the interview and you ask them to look at your portfolio they'll pull it up on a computer.

Edited by frob
More thoughts.

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I've had candidates bring in working copies of their games on phones/tablets. It's a nice way to demonstrate preparedness and also show off your work, IMO.

As for resume/CV links, I say put 'em on there. A lot of times all I see about an applicant is a resume, so if you can point me at more information about yourself, I'm very likely to take the time to check it out.


Frankly, if your resume leaves me "hungry for more", I don't consider that a great sign. Deliberately omitting valuable information is kinda lame if you ask me. Keep in mind you're likely to be working with people who are short on time, looking at dozens of competing applicants, and oftentimes digging for excuses to say "no thanks." Respect the time of these people. Respect their desire to know as much about your professional work as practical so they can make an informed hiring decision.

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I bought a tablet for this very reason. A laptop might be more useful depending on your situation but there is a clean simplicity to just being able to hand over a tablet. I have no personal experience with hyperlinks on a resume but if you have a basic website show casing your work I would say that's a great thing to put on as long as it is simple to remember and type in. No one is going to type in some crazy youtube url to a video but that's solved with Frob's suggestion.

Edited by Nanoha

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From the interviewer side (non gamedev software currently), the printing is only a last step, so I can write my questions on it. I would prefer to have the links in there because I get input from others by forwarding the resume by email.

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Right,

I'll likely keep them in.

 

Well, the thing is, I was told I gave too much info, that they could just look at my resume and go yes, or no if he's a good fit.

 

Orymus3 told me a similar thing, when he gave me feedback.

 

Information overload.

 

I had links to all the projects I do, the publications I've wrote, the interviews I've been in.

 

Told to dial it down a bit, so they had reasons to ask me to come in and explain what those things were. (instead of just showing them off the bat, before they even meet me.)

 

Maybe I'll just do linkedin, and my current project?

hmm

 

linkedin has everything tho...

Edited by GeneralJist

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It's a balance to be sure.

 

#1) Include all the reasons they should hire you.

 

#2) Omit all the reasons they should exclude you.

 

The same information can fit into either category depending on who is looking at it.  Maybe they're looking for a gameplay programmer, or a tools programmer, or a server engineer, or specialty on VR, or specialty on iPhone, or specialty on Android, or whatever.  They may also have side needs, and you happen to mention something they want to add to their talent pool.  

One company may have no need for that specific thing, another company may be desperate for it.

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